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Friday Feature: @starryEyes

So, we’ve been briefed about it and have read some articles on it and can now say it is Friday. It's not fake news, people. It’s Friday. And we’d be doing Prose a very, very big disservice if we didn’t bring you the very, very good thing that is Friday Feature. People love it. Everybody says so. They like to read about the very, very nice people of Prose...

OK, enough of that crazy talk, let’s dive in to meet the entirely lovely @starryEyes

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

S: My name is Kim, but you can find me as starryEyes on Prose.

P: Where do you live?

S: I live in the northeast United States, out in the country on top of a hill with a fantastic view. My grandfather built the house in the 1970s and I absolutely love living here with my husband. Watching the birds, animals, wild weather, and changing seasons makes me happy.

We get our Internet by antenna from a local provider who beams it over from a tower that’s 4 miles away (no cable service out here). It’s better than satellite, except when wind, rain, and foliage conspire to eat data packets!

P: What is your occupation?

S: Hmmm… I’m probably most occupied with taking care of myself. So maybe my occupation is being alive? Or surviving. But I’d prefer “thriving.” That can be my occupation: thriving.

I went to school for electrical engineering and worked for five years designing and testing radar electronics. I absolutely loved it. But chronic Lyme disease made that impossible. I’m principally afflicted by profound fatigue and brain fog, but generally have a few good hours a day.

Right now I am content. There is so much more I’d like to do in life, but I’m pleased that I’m not getting any worse right now and have a sort of rhythm of productivity, fulfillment, and rest.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

S: Growing up, I wrote for school. I enjoyed all my writing assignments but rarely wrote of my own initiative. Late in high school and college, I kept a “prayer” journal that helped me untangle my thoughts and feelings while writing to God.

As I progressed in my engineering studies and career, I wrote a lot of technical documents. It turns out I really enjoy writing lab reports, test procedures, and documenting my designs. And who doesn’t love a good table or expressive graph? *happy sigh*

The first poem I ever wrote of my own free will flowed from my illness. My choppy, foggy, scattered, and desperate thoughts needed adequate expression. I now write poetry like it’s a puzzle to be solved - conveying meaning and depth by sound & structure & few words – an artistic efficiency. It must be the engineer in me.

I started writing short stories a year ago for fun. I really haven’t written many because I’m a slow writer and I don’t often feel well. But it makes me feel human and “normal” to compose something that I’m proud of. I attend a writing group at the library and find it immensely helpful and encouraging.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

S: I’ve always been a voracious reader of fiction. It makes me happy, stirs my imagination, fills me with stories, and teaches me about life. I love gleaning bits of wisdom from book characters and pondering their thoughts and actions. It’s an easy, gentle way to learn.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

I don’t have specific posting plans, but I often respond to writing challenges. Apparently I like to write from the perspective of non-humans such as an animal, plant, or park bench, so you may see more of that. I might sometimes write about my illness or my faith in Jesus, because both deeply define who I am. My loftiest dream is to write a historical choose-your-own-adventure book for kids.

P: What do you love about Prose?

S: Challenges, challenges, challenges! I’m way more motivated when someone challenges me than when I make up my own goals. That’s probably a character flaw. But I’m getting lots of practice and inspiration from the Prose community challenges and having fun! I also like the opportunity to share what I write and interact with other writers.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

S: There are oodles of good books, so how could I choose? But limited to one, I’d have to say the Bible. I believe that how we respond to Jesus is the single most important decision in this life. To make an informed choice, we have to read his words.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

S: If so, they are extremely unsung because I can’t think of who they might be! My parents and teachers were obvious influences, but no one person or event stands out in my mind.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

S: Contemplative. Sincere. Empathetic.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

S: “In Christ alone my hope is found. He is my light, my strength, my song… And as He stands in victory, sin’s curse has lost its grip on me! For I am His, and He is mine, bought with the precious blood of Christ.”

And the entire rest of the lyrics to “In Christ Alone” written by Stuart Townsend & Keith Getty

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

S: I like pop / rock / metal. My favorite artists are Britt Nicole, Fireflight (similar to Evanescence), and Tourniquet (similar to Metallica). I also really like a cappella and folk music. I can do anything to music except read and write. For those, silence is more conducive to concentration.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

S: “You know, books. B-O-O-K-S. Like writing. On paper. That you read. There must be some. This isn’t possible. Where did you go to school? Where’s the library?” After asking the same questions twenty times but getting the same answer, I think I’d become unresponsive and curl up, rocking back and forth.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

S: Curled up in a recliner with a blanket and a cat. Preferably my own recliner and my own cat. Any blanket will do.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

S: Nothing left to tell!

Thanks so much to Kim, it was marvellous to meet her, I'm sure you'll all agree. You know what to do now. Read her! Interact with her! Follow her! 

And again, we want more Prosers for this feature, so if you like it, then suggest people, even volunteer yourselves. Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. Get busy.

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @starryEyes
So, we’ve been briefed about it and have read some articles on it and can now say it is Friday. It's not fake news, people. It’s Friday. And we’d be doing Prose a very, very big disservice if we didn’t bring you the very, very good thing that is Friday Feature. People love it. Everybody says so. They like to read about the very, very nice people of Prose...

OK, enough of that crazy talk, let’s dive in to meet the entirely lovely @starryEyes

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
S: My name is Kim, but you can find me as starryEyes on Prose.

P: Where do you live?
S: I live in the northeast United States, out in the country on top of a hill with a fantastic view. My grandfather built the house in the 1970s and I absolutely love living here with my husband. Watching the birds, animals, wild weather, and changing seasons makes me happy.

We get our Internet by antenna from a local provider who beams it over from a tower that’s 4 miles away (no cable service out here). It’s better than satellite, except when wind, rain, and foliage conspire to eat data packets!

P: What is your occupation?
S: Hmmm… I’m probably most occupied with taking care of myself. So maybe my occupation is being alive? Or surviving. But I’d prefer “thriving.” That can be my occupation: thriving.

I went to school for electrical engineering and worked for five years designing and testing radar electronics. I absolutely loved it. But chronic Lyme disease made that impossible. I’m principally afflicted by profound fatigue and brain fog, but generally have a few good hours a day.

Right now I am content. There is so much more I’d like to do in life, but I’m pleased that I’m not getting any worse right now and have a sort of rhythm of productivity, fulfillment, and rest.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
S: Growing up, I wrote for school. I enjoyed all my writing assignments but rarely wrote of my own initiative. Late in high school and college, I kept a “prayer” journal that helped me untangle my thoughts and feelings while writing to God.

As I progressed in my engineering studies and career, I wrote a lot of technical documents. It turns out I really enjoy writing lab reports, test procedures, and documenting my designs. And who doesn’t love a good table or expressive graph? *happy sigh*

The first poem I ever wrote of my own free will flowed from my illness. My choppy, foggy, scattered, and desperate thoughts needed adequate expression. I now write poetry like it’s a puzzle to be solved - conveying meaning and depth by sound & structure & few words – an artistic efficiency. It must be the engineer in me.

I started writing short stories a year ago for fun. I really haven’t written many because I’m a slow writer and I don’t often feel well. But it makes me feel human and “normal” to compose something that I’m proud of. I attend a writing group at the library and find it immensely helpful and encouraging.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
S: I’ve always been a voracious reader of fiction. It makes me happy, stirs my imagination, fills me with stories, and teaches me about life. I love gleaning bits of wisdom from book characters and pondering their thoughts and actions. It’s an easy, gentle way to learn.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

I don’t have specific posting plans, but I often respond to writing challenges. Apparently I like to write from the perspective of non-humans such as an animal, plant, or park bench, so you may see more of that. I might sometimes write about my illness or my faith in Jesus, because both deeply define who I am. My loftiest dream is to write a historical choose-your-own-adventure book for kids.

P: What do you love about Prose?
S: Challenges, challenges, challenges! I’m way more motivated when someone challenges me than when I make up my own goals. That’s probably a character flaw. But I’m getting lots of practice and inspiration from the Prose community challenges and having fun! I also like the opportunity to share what I write and interact with other writers.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
S: There are oodles of good books, so how could I choose? But limited to one, I’d have to say the Bible. I believe that how we respond to Jesus is the single most important decision in this life. To make an informed choice, we have to read his words.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
S: If so, they are extremely unsung because I can’t think of who they might be! My parents and teachers were obvious influences, but no one person or event stands out in my mind.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
S: Contemplative. Sincere. Empathetic.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
S: “In Christ alone my hope is found. He is my light, my strength, my song… And as He stands in victory, sin’s curse has lost its grip on me! For I am His, and He is mine, bought with the precious blood of Christ.”

And the entire rest of the lyrics to “In Christ Alone” written by Stuart Townsend & Keith Getty

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
S: I like pop / rock / metal. My favorite artists are Britt Nicole, Fireflight (similar to Evanescence), and Tourniquet (similar to Metallica). I also really like a cappella and folk music. I can do anything to music except read and write. For those, silence is more conducive to concentration.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
S: “You know, books. B-O-O-K-S. Like writing. On paper. That you read. There must be some. This isn’t possible. Where did you go to school? Where’s the library?” After asking the same questions twenty times but getting the same answer, I think I’d become unresponsive and curl up, rocking back and forth.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
S: Curled up in a recliner with a blanket and a cat. Preferably my own recliner and my own cat. Any blanket will do.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
S: Nothing left to tell!

Thanks so much to Kim, it was marvellous to meet her, I'm sure you'll all agree. You know what to do now. Read her! Interact with her! Follow her! 

And again, we want more Prosers for this feature, so if you like it, then suggest people, even volunteer yourselves. Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. Get busy.
#nonfiction  #news  #opinion  #FF  #FridayFeature 
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Prose Challenge of the Week #58

Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-eight of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been rewriting the creation story, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who is the deserving winner and the recipient of $100, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #58: You are a victim of injustice, write a story about it. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $150. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Yes! This one is for a longer duration and for more $, so get yourself writing, now!

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-seven.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “creation story” challenge is @madbeyond with their piece, Out of the Blue

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Prose Challenge of the Week #58
Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-eight of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been rewriting the creation story, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who is the deserving winner and the recipient of $100, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #58: You are a victim of injustice, write a story about it. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $150. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Yes! This one is for a longer duration and for more $, so get yourself writing, now!

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-seven.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “creation story” challenge is @madbeyond with their piece, Out of the Blue

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.
#prosechallenge  #CotW  #Itslit  #getlit 
27
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Friday Feature: @MarkOlmsted

Yes, we blinked and it happened again, dear Prosers. It’s Friday. And what a day it is, as it’s the time of the week that we get another Proser’s information. Confession is not betrayal. What you say or do doesn't matter: only feelings matter. Yep, I quoted 1984. 

Anyway, this week we get to meet one helluva guy that if you don’t know on Prose, then you really should. It’s @MarkOlmsted

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

M: They are one and the same - Mark Olmsted. But I do have a slightly interesting story about my name. I am half-French, and my mother named me after my grandfather, Marcel. But my dad was afraid I would be teased for sounding “foreign” (it was 1958), so he made sure it was spelled “Mark” was on my birth certificate. When I grew older, I started to use “Marc” for all my writing, even using MarcOlmsted.com as a website. 

When Facebook came on the scene, I friended another Marc Olmsted, who turned out to be a fairly prominent San Francisco poet. He eventually told me he was starting to get asked at readings how prison and HIV had affected his work (audience members had googled him and stumbled on my history.) So I offered to switch back to my legal spelling permanently, and even gave him my website. I didn’t really mind – it ends up being easier to use the same spelling as the one on your license anyway.

P: Where do you live?

M: Hollywood, California.

P: What is your occupation?

M: I transcribe movies and TV shows, as well as edit film subtitles. (They come to me in English, but they often are not perfectly translated or have grammatical or spelling errors, so I fix them.)

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

M: I majored in screenwriting at NYU Film School, and that was my focus for 15 years. I came very, very close to getting a movie made, but two directors died on me in a row and I took what turned out to be a very long break. I then switched to magazine writing, and edited a national publication for gay men. Then I stopped working because of HIV, and got into drugs, but did keep writing poetry. In 2004 I spent 9 months in prison, and wrote letters home rather prolifically. They formed the basis of my memoir, Ink from the Pen. After my release, I blogged extensively, both personally and as a journalist. I got a M.A. in Creative Writing in 2013, and my Master’s Thesis was a screenplay, The Exiled Heart. Through it all, I have always written short stories, the best of which are in Lost and Found in the Prose Bookstore.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

M: They say a good writer is a good reader, and I think this is true. But it’s also a challenge for me to read as much as I’d like because I often feel I should use that time to be writing. (I’m 58, and way behind schedule!) That’s why I do most of my non-internet reading on the stationery bike at the gym. It’s amazing how many books you can read in a year just by devoting 90 minutes a week to it.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

M: Completing Ink from the Pen was huge for me, and I’m trying to find a literary agent to shop it to traditional publishers. I will keep adding pieces to my other three books in the Prose bookstore, and will continue work on the prequel to Ink – which documents the long and gradual arc of mendacity and addiction that lead to my incarceration.

P: What do you love about Prose?

M: Well, first the community – it’s amazingly supportive. I have yet to post anything that does not get read and commented on favorably – which I also try to do for others as much as possible, particularly the Poets in Prison.

But it is the bookstore that has put a great anxiety of mine to rest. I have finally found one repository for all of my eclectic work. If I get hit by a bus tomorrow, I know my work will live on forever on one bookshelf on the internet. And if I never write a bestseller in this lifetime, who knows, I may become a sensation in some Star Trekian world of the future, where a vast intergalactic computer scans literature from the previous 3000 years for every reader’s taste.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

M: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. It is a perfect book.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

M: My fourth grade teacher, Miss Mitchell, assigned us to write a short story as our semester assignment. I was pretty sure after finishing mine: The Black-Framed Letter (about the French underground – which amusingly, I thought was actually located underground), I knew I was going to be a writer.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

M: Funny. Clever. Compassionate.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

M: “It wasn't until late in life that I discovered how easy it is to say, 'I don't know.'”

–W. Somerset Maugham

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

M: Movie scores – Alexander Desplat in particular I really love to write to. And of course sometimes you just have to take a break and dance to Marvin Gaye.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

M: I’d ask for a pen and paper and start writing one, of course. (Everybody must say that.) I suspect I’d call it: “The Super Brand-New Testament.”

Of course, I might have to teach them to read and probably re-invent the printing press, so it could take a while.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

M: My computer is in my bedroom office. As a matter of practicality, it’s the only place I write. But I like it fine because I have a horrific case of A.D.D. and need to check Facebook, Prose, and Twitter every 7 minutes.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

M: Read everything I post on Prose and like it. Retweet everything I post on Twitter (@marquismarq). Follow me on Facebook and slavishly comment on every post, only saying worshipful things. And buy my book. Lots and lots of copies.

Well, you heard the man! Follow him! Read him! Adore him! Seriously, go check him out, you won’t be disappointed. Get those eyes opened up to stuff you may not know about.

And again we implore you: we want more Prosers for this feature, so if you like it, then please suggest people, and even volunteer yourselves. Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. So c'mon, get busy and get in touch on paul@theprose.com

30
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12
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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @MarkOlmsted
Yes, we blinked and it happened again, dear Prosers. It’s Friday. And what a day it is, as it’s the time of the week that we get another Proser’s information. Confession is not betrayal. What you say or do doesn't matter: only feelings matter. Yep, I quoted 1984. 

Anyway, this week we get to meet one helluva guy that if you don’t know on Prose, then you really should. It’s @MarkOlmsted

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
M: They are one and the same - Mark Olmsted. But I do have a slightly interesting story about my name. I am half-French, and my mother named me after my grandfather, Marcel. But my dad was afraid I would be teased for sounding “foreign” (it was 1958), so he made sure it was spelled “Mark” was on my birth certificate. When I grew older, I started to use “Marc” for all my writing, even using MarcOlmsted.com as a website. 

When Facebook came on the scene, I friended another Marc Olmsted, who turned out to be a fairly prominent San Francisco poet. He eventually told me he was starting to get asked at readings how prison and HIV had affected his work (audience members had googled him and stumbled on my history.) So I offered to switch back to my legal spelling permanently, and even gave him my website. I didn’t really mind – it ends up being easier to use the same spelling as the one on your license anyway.

P: Where do you live?
M: Hollywood, California.

P: What is your occupation?
M: I transcribe movies and TV shows, as well as edit film subtitles. (They come to me in English, but they often are not perfectly translated or have grammatical or spelling errors, so I fix them.)

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
M: I majored in screenwriting at NYU Film School, and that was my focus for 15 years. I came very, very close to getting a movie made, but two directors died on me in a row and I took what turned out to be a very long break. I then switched to magazine writing, and edited a national publication for gay men. Then I stopped working because of HIV, and got into drugs, but did keep writing poetry. In 2004 I spent 9 months in prison, and wrote letters home rather prolifically. They formed the basis of my memoir, Ink from the Pen. After my release, I blogged extensively, both personally and as a journalist. I got a M.A. in Creative Writing in 2013, and my Master’s Thesis was a screenplay, The Exiled Heart. Through it all, I have always written short stories, the best of which are in Lost and Found in the Prose Bookstore.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
M: They say a good writer is a good reader, and I think this is true. But it’s also a challenge for me to read as much as I’d like because I often feel I should use that time to be writing. (I’m 58, and way behind schedule!) That’s why I do most of my non-internet reading on the stationery bike at the gym. It’s amazing how many books you can read in a year just by devoting 90 minutes a week to it.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
M: Completing Ink from the Pen was huge for me, and I’m trying to find a literary agent to shop it to traditional publishers. I will keep adding pieces to my other three books in the Prose bookstore, and will continue work on the prequel to Ink – which documents the long and gradual arc of mendacity and addiction that lead to my incarceration.

P: What do you love about Prose?
M: Well, first the community – it’s amazingly supportive. I have yet to post anything that does not get read and commented on favorably – which I also try to do for others as much as possible, particularly the Poets in Prison.

But it is the bookstore that has put a great anxiety of mine to rest. I have finally found one repository for all of my eclectic work. If I get hit by a bus tomorrow, I know my work will live on forever on one bookshelf on the internet. And if I never write a bestseller in this lifetime, who knows, I may become a sensation in some Star Trekian world of the future, where a vast intergalactic computer scans literature from the previous 3000 years for every reader’s taste.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
M: The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. It is a perfect book.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
M: My fourth grade teacher, Miss Mitchell, assigned us to write a short story as our semester assignment. I was pretty sure after finishing mine: The Black-Framed Letter (about the French underground – which amusingly, I thought was actually located underground), I knew I was going to be a writer.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
M: Funny. Clever. Compassionate.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
M: “It wasn't until late in life that I discovered how easy it is to say, 'I don't know.'”
–W. Somerset Maugham

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
M: Movie scores – Alexander Desplat in particular I really love to write to. And of course sometimes you just have to take a break and dance to Marvin Gaye.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
M: I’d ask for a pen and paper and start writing one, of course. (Everybody must say that.) I suspect I’d call it: “The Super Brand-New Testament.”

Of course, I might have to teach them to read and probably re-invent the printing press, so it could take a while.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
M: My computer is in my bedroom office. As a matter of practicality, it’s the only place I write. But I like it fine because I have a horrific case of A.D.D. and need to check Facebook, Prose, and Twitter every 7 minutes.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
M: Read everything I post on Prose and like it. Retweet everything I post on Twitter (@marquismarq). Follow me on Facebook and slavishly comment on every post, only saying worshipful things. And buy my book. Lots and lots of copies.

Well, you heard the man! Follow him! Read him! Adore him! Seriously, go check him out, you won’t be disappointed. Get those eyes opened up to stuff you may not know about.

And again we implore you: we want more Prosers for this feature, so if you like it, then please suggest people, and even volunteer yourselves. Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. So c'mon, get busy and get in touch on paul@theprose.com

#nonfiction  #philosophy  #news  #opinion  #FF 
30
7
12
Juice
321 reads
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Written by Prose in portal Prose

Prose Challenge of the Week #57

Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-seven of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been writing about tyranny, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who is the deserving winner and the recipient of $100, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #57: you’re god; rewrite the creation story. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-six.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “tyranny” challenge is @Harlequin with their piece, The Remedy: A Jester’s Tale.

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

18
8
12
Juice
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Donate coins to Prose.
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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Prose Challenge of the Week #57
Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-seven of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been writing about tyranny, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who is the deserving winner and the recipient of $100, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #57: you’re god; rewrite the creation story. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-six.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “tyranny” challenge is @Harlequin with their piece, The Remedy: A Jester’s Tale.

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.
#prosechallenge  #challengeoftheweek  #CotW  #Itslit  #getlit 
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Challenge of the Month #2

Greetings, Prosers,

It’s back. It’s Challenge of the Month.

Each month, we set you all a prompt within a Portal of our choosing. We then give you the entire duration of the challenge to create your literary splendor. After the challenge expires, the team will then take a look at specific data - number of reads, likes, reposts, and comments - along with reading the entries to ensure superior content. From there, we will choose fifteen pieces to be included in our new Prose Original Book. These books will be made up of your content, and will be sold on Prose for 500 coins. To find out whether your entry made it, you will have to grab yourself a copy.

So, what do you get in return?

If you are one of the lucky fifteen, you will receive 5% royalties for the lifetime of the book. This means non-Partners can also earn themselves some Prose coin, as anyone can enter. We think this is a new, quick, easy, and exciting way to become a published, professional author, and what better way to do that than with Prose‽

Let’s take a look at the second Challenge of the Month:

Prose Challenge of the Month #2: Write a story where you wake up as the most intelligent person on Earth. Fifteen entries will be featured in a 500-coin Prose Original Book, whereby each winner will take 5% lifetime royalties. You must purchase the book to discover its authors, who will be determined by objective data (reads, likes, reposts, comments) and by team vote to ensure reader satisfaction. When sharing to social media, please use the hashtags “itslit,” “getlit,” and “ProseChallenge.”

Write smart.

What better motivation than a brand-new challenge and a way to earn money and bragging rights when you become a professional author?

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Challenge of the Month #2
Greetings, Prosers,

It’s back. It’s Challenge of the Month.

Each month, we set you all a prompt within a Portal of our choosing. We then give you the entire duration of the challenge to create your literary splendor. After the challenge expires, the team will then take a look at specific data - number of reads, likes, reposts, and comments - along with reading the entries to ensure superior content. From there, we will choose fifteen pieces to be included in our new Prose Original Book. These books will be made up of your content, and will be sold on Prose for 500 coins. To find out whether your entry made it, you will have to grab yourself a copy.

So, what do you get in return?

If you are one of the lucky fifteen, you will receive 5% royalties for the lifetime of the book. This means non-Partners can also earn themselves some Prose coin, as anyone can enter. We think this is a new, quick, easy, and exciting way to become a published, professional author, and what better way to do that than with Prose‽

Let’s take a look at the second Challenge of the Month:

Prose Challenge of the Month #2: Write a story where you wake up as the most intelligent person on Earth. Fifteen entries will be featured in a 500-coin Prose Original Book, whereby each winner will take 5% lifetime royalties. You must purchase the book to discover its authors, who will be determined by objective data (reads, likes, reposts, comments) and by team vote to ensure reader satisfaction. When sharing to social media, please use the hashtags “itslit,” “getlit,” and “ProseChallenge.”

Write smart.

What better motivation than a brand-new challenge and a way to earn money and bragging rights when you become a professional author?

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.


#prosechallenge  #Announcement  #Itslit  #ChallengeoftheMonth  #CotM 
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Friday Feature: @JessicaJohnson

Well, another entirely uneventful week in the world has flown by and brought us blinking blearily at this fresh Friday. That means just one thing. We focus upon a Proser and find out what we can about them. This week we head to Illinois to meet up and question (without torture) a Proser that goes by the name of @JessicaJohnson

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

JJ: My given name and my Proser username are one and the same: @JessicaJohnson. Rather boring, I suppose.

P: Where do you live?

JJ: I live in rural southern Illinois in a small town surrounded by farming fields, mostly of the corn and bean variety.

P: What is your occupation?

JJ: My occupational title is Medical Laboratory Technician. I work in a hospital lab running various tests on blood and other bodily fluids as ordered by doctors and nurse practitioners.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

JJ: My love for writing arose from my middle school days and an English teacher who introduced me to poetry. One of the first poems she had our class read was The Arrow and the Song by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and I remember wanting to write something as beautiful and flowing as I found that poem. This teacher encouraged me to write and experiment with different forms of poetry, and I have been writing on and off ever since. As I moved on to high school and college, writing became a form of catharsis, and my writing moved to darker subject matter. Writing became a coping mechanism and a release. Today, my writing doesn't stay stagnant in one genre, but rather drifts between the darkness and the light.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

JJ: Oh, how I love books. And reading itself is invaluable. Professionally, reading is essential. The medical laboratory field is a constant flux of change with new diagnostic tests and testing methods to keep up to date on. Personally, I have always loved to read. There is nothing quite like getting lost in an authors words and being transported to their world. To quote George R. R. Martin, "A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies...The man who never reads lives only one."

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what we can look forward to in future posts?

JJ: I have always been a recreational writer, writing about whatever inspires me. Mostly, my writes were for my eyes only until I found Prose. I have, however, been working slowly on a project or two with the idea to publish in the future.

P: What do you love about Prose? Prose is great!

JJ: The community here is exceptional. Everyone is so supportive, offering encouraging words and helpful criticism. I've never stumbled upon a writing community as encouraging and as kind as Prose. I also love the massive amounts of talent here. I believe my writing has improved with my time spent here, largely due to the incredible talent that is so free flowing on these pages.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

JJ: I could never recommend ONLY ONE book. Of the classics, I would recommend Bram Stoker's Dracula, Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. I would also recommend everything I have ever read by Edgar Allen Poe. There are many other classics I have read that I enjoy, but these are my favorites. Of the more modern books, I would highly recommend Easy by Tammara Weber (I have read it multiple times) for the strength and message of the story. I would also highly recommend The Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini, a group of 4 epic fantasy novels that weave a captivating tale of elves, dragons, magic, and all kinds of other awesomeness.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

JJ: My grandma helped instill my love for reading. I remember as a kid sitting on her lap and having her read my favorite stories to me over and over again on a very regular basis. 

Also, the above mentioned middle school English teacher would fit this response for her inspiration and encouragement.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

JJ: Contemplative. Quiet. Curious.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

JJ: I can't think of a quote that sums me up, but this is one of my favorite quotes: "We've all been sorry. We've all been hurt. But how we survive is what makes us who we are." -Rise Against

P: What is your favourite music to listen to, and do you write to it?

JJ: I enjoy just about anything in the rock n' roll genre of music, but I love hard rock, alternative rock, and metal. Recently, I have been listening to a lot of Butcher Babies, Bullet For My Valentine, Halestorm, and In This Moment. But I must also mention my longtime love for these excellent bands: System of a Down, Disturbed, Tool, Breaking Benjamin, Slipknot, Audioslave, Rise Against, Marylin Manson, Chevelle, etc. I do have the occasional softer side that enjoys classical music, or perhaps some Taylor Swift or Katy Perry. But, mostly, in the words of Halestorm, "I like it heavy." As for the second part of this question, I don't generally write to music. However, music has many times inspired me to write.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

JJ: Tell me how this happened! I have a time machine, and we are going to amend this atrocity!

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

JJ: The only other social media account I currently have is a facebook page under my name. I don't promote much of my writing there, but you are welcome to friend me if you can find me.

Thanks SOOO much to Jessica for her time. Follow her, engage with her and read her words.

Meanwhile, c’mon guys. We’re running out of Prosers, so if you like this feature then please suggest people, even volunteer yourselves. Plus, if I (@PaulDChambers) has sent you some questions, then please answer them and send ‘em back! If you have and have yet to see the fruits of your labour, then chase me on paul@theprose.com

Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. Get busy.

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Friday Feature: @JessicaJohnson
Well, another entirely uneventful week in the world has flown by and brought us blinking blearily at this fresh Friday. That means just one thing. We focus upon a Proser and find out what we can about them. This week we head to Illinois to meet up and question (without torture) a Proser that goes by the name of @JessicaJohnson

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
JJ: My given name and my Proser username are one and the same: @JessicaJohnson. Rather boring, I suppose.

P: Where do you live?
JJ: I live in rural southern Illinois in a small town surrounded by farming fields, mostly of the corn and bean variety.

P: What is your occupation?
JJ: My occupational title is Medical Laboratory Technician. I work in a hospital lab running various tests on blood and other bodily fluids as ordered by doctors and nurse practitioners.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
JJ: My love for writing arose from my middle school days and an English teacher who introduced me to poetry. One of the first poems she had our class read was The Arrow and the Song by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and I remember wanting to write something as beautiful and flowing as I found that poem. This teacher encouraged me to write and experiment with different forms of poetry, and I have been writing on and off ever since. As I moved on to high school and college, writing became a form of catharsis, and my writing moved to darker subject matter. Writing became a coping mechanism and a release. Today, my writing doesn't stay stagnant in one genre, but rather drifts between the darkness and the light.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
JJ: Oh, how I love books. And reading itself is invaluable. Professionally, reading is essential. The medical laboratory field is a constant flux of change with new diagnostic tests and testing methods to keep up to date on. Personally, I have always loved to read. There is nothing quite like getting lost in an authors words and being transported to their world. To quote George R. R. Martin, "A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies...The man who never reads lives only one."

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what we can look forward to in future posts?
JJ: I have always been a recreational writer, writing about whatever inspires me. Mostly, my writes were for my eyes only until I found Prose. I have, however, been working slowly on a project or two with the idea to publish in the future.

P: What do you love about Prose? Prose is great!
JJ: The community here is exceptional. Everyone is so supportive, offering encouraging words and helpful criticism. I've never stumbled upon a writing community as encouraging and as kind as Prose. I also love the massive amounts of talent here. I believe my writing has improved with my time spent here, largely due to the incredible talent that is so free flowing on these pages.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
JJ: I could never recommend ONLY ONE book. Of the classics, I would recommend Bram Stoker's Dracula, Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. I would also recommend everything I have ever read by Edgar Allen Poe. There are many other classics I have read that I enjoy, but these are my favorites. Of the more modern books, I would highly recommend Easy by Tammara Weber (I have read it multiple times) for the strength and message of the story. I would also highly recommend The Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini, a group of 4 epic fantasy novels that weave a captivating tale of elves, dragons, magic, and all kinds of other awesomeness.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
JJ: My grandma helped instill my love for reading. I remember as a kid sitting on her lap and having her read my favorite stories to me over and over again on a very regular basis. 

Also, the above mentioned middle school English teacher would fit this response for her inspiration and encouragement.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
JJ: Contemplative. Quiet. Curious.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
JJ: I can't think of a quote that sums me up, but this is one of my favorite quotes: "We've all been sorry. We've all been hurt. But how we survive is what makes us who we are." -Rise Against

P: What is your favourite music to listen to, and do you write to it?
JJ: I enjoy just about anything in the rock n' roll genre of music, but I love hard rock, alternative rock, and metal. Recently, I have been listening to a lot of Butcher Babies, Bullet For My Valentine, Halestorm, and In This Moment. But I must also mention my longtime love for these excellent bands: System of a Down, Disturbed, Tool, Breaking Benjamin, Slipknot, Audioslave, Rise Against, Marylin Manson, Chevelle, etc. I do have the occasional softer side that enjoys classical music, or perhaps some Taylor Swift or Katy Perry. But, mostly, in the words of Halestorm, "I like it heavy." As for the second part of this question, I don't generally write to music. However, music has many times inspired me to write.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
JJ: Tell me how this happened! I have a time machine, and we are going to amend this atrocity!

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
JJ: The only other social media account I currently have is a facebook page under my name. I don't promote much of my writing there, but you are welcome to friend me if you can find me.

Thanks SOOO much to Jessica for her time. Follow her, engage with her and read her words.

Meanwhile, c’mon guys. We’re running out of Prosers, so if you like this feature then please suggest people, even volunteer yourselves. Plus, if I (@PaulDChambers) has sent you some questions, then please answer them and send ‘em back! If you have and have yet to see the fruits of your labour, then chase me on paul@theprose.com

Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. Get busy.
#nonfiction  #philosophy  #news  #opinion  #FF 
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Writer Wednesday

Good morning, Prosers,


This feature focuses on the wonderful words coming from our Poets in Prison contributors. Some of you may not be aware of this initiative yet, but by the end of this post you will be!


Each and every Wednesday, Sammie and Paul visit prison and teach creative writing to the residents there. We then bring their words to Prose and post them in the Letters from Prison Portal where members of the Prose community comment on them, providing much needed support and feedback which we then take back into prison and share with the residents.


This program has provided the inmates with a much-needed release whilst improving their spelling, grammar, self-confidence, and has had a profound effect on their mental health, too.


This new weekly feature is to celebrate some of the cracking words that escape the bars and make their way onto Prose.

Hell have no fury like a man

Clad in his own skin

Stepping closer to

His demon within

~@PrisonAnonymous

From: His Demon Within


You were a harbour of my passion

An armoury held to discipline

Leave me, else I falter in your presence

You fan the flames

Of my obsession

~@fifty

From: Emotion Forsaken


A touch, a kiss

Passion and bliss

Love making so needed

My body’s responses heeded

~@Squeakypeewee01

From: Love



If you like what you read here, we encourage you to check out the Portal, get commenting and supporting this amazing program.


Until next Wednesday, Prosers,


Prose.


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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Writer Wednesday
Good morning, Prosers,

This feature focuses on the wonderful words coming from our Poets in Prison contributors. Some of you may not be aware of this initiative yet, but by the end of this post you will be!

Each and every Wednesday, Sammie and Paul visit prison and teach creative writing to the residents there. We then bring their words to Prose and post them in the Letters from Prison Portal where members of the Prose community comment on them, providing much needed support and feedback which we then take back into prison and share with the residents.

This program has provided the inmates with a much-needed release whilst improving their spelling, grammar, self-confidence, and has had a profound effect on their mental health, too.

This new weekly feature is to celebrate some of the cracking words that escape the bars and make their way onto Prose.

Hell have no fury like a man
Clad in his own skin
Stepping closer to
His demon within
~@PrisonAnonymous
From: His Demon Within


You were a harbour of my passion
An armoury held to discipline
Leave me, else I falter in your presence
You fan the flames
Of my obsession
~@fifty
From: Emotion Forsaken

A touch, a kiss
Passion and bliss
Love making so needed
My body’s responses heeded
~@Squeakypeewee01
From: Love



If you like what you read here, we encourage you to check out the Portal, get commenting and supporting this amazing program.

Until next Wednesday, Prosers,

Prose.

#support  #WriterWednesday  #LettersFromPrison  #Itslit  #getlit  #WW  #feature 
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Prose Challenge of the Week #56

Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-six of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last two weeks, you guys have been writing about a stranger, and boy did you all deliver. Before we check out who is the lucky winner and the recipient of $200, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #56: Write the beginning of a story about a tyrannical king who threatens the entire realm. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-five.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “stranger” challenge is @dobbyness3 with their piece Thanatos.

Congratulations! You have just won $200. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime Prosers, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Prose Challenge of the Week #56
Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-six of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last two weeks, you guys have been writing about a stranger, and boy did you all deliver. Before we check out who is the lucky winner and the recipient of $200, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #56: Write the beginning of a story about a tyrannical king who threatens the entire realm. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-five.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “stranger” challenge is @dobbyness3 with their piece Thanatos.

Congratulations! You have just won $200. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime Prosers, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

#challenge  #prosechallenge  #challengeoftheweek  #CotW  #Itslit 
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Friday Feature: @PhynneBelle

Well, lovely Prosers; it’s that day of the week again. It’s Friday. Huzzah! So that means that we peek behind the doors of a Proser that we may or may not know. This week we head to the awesome city of San Francisco (my favourite American city – PaulDChambers) to find out all about a lady that lies behind the sobriquet of @PhynneBelle

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

PH: Hallo Prosers! Some of you may know you me as Trish, but many of you know me by the moniker PhynneBelle. If you're nice, I'll even respond to Fish or Phone Bell.

P: Where do you live?

PH: I have lived in the San Francisco Bay Area, home of the Six Gallery and the Friday Poet's Salon for the past twenty-sixish years.

P: What is your occupation?

PH: I champion the cause of helpless furballs everywhere! I work in general medicine veterinary practice.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

PH: Writing and I have been tempestuous lovers through many long years. Yes, I think that's a good way to visualize it. Perhaps we started out as very peripheral acquaintances while I had other creative outlets as affairs--intense infatuations with visual art and fashion, passion-filled dalliances with dance--but expressing and making order of my energetic, sometimes frenetic thoughts and ideas in poetic form has always been this constant, this very sane and centered solitude to which I return.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

PH: In reading, even genres and stories to which one would normally not be drawn, especially these initially "undesirable" topics or ideas, one's tastes are imperceptibly shaped. The interest is suddenly expanded or constricted to a very definite preference. For me, this easily parlayed into how I approach my own writing; there is an intuitive purveyor of sorts that shapes voice, story, direction, style.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

PH: Is there every any predictability when comes to my writing? For better or worse, I write what the very moment whispers in my ear. Or what tends to wake me in the middle of the night, insisting on being heard and faithfully recorded. I admit I am being seduced once more into the genius of eloquence within brevity--I'd like to revisit there, see where it will lead. A peculiar notion (peculiar to me at least) popped in a few weeks ago to try out something episodic, something narrative, drawing on non-sequential recollections with a uniting element.

P: What do you love about Prose?

PH: The endless corridors and turns where I happen upon talented new writers. I have yet to discover everyone and that is both maddening and exciting! The like-minded friends I have made; I doubt I will meet a Proser that would be astonished should I ever decide to run away from my daily life, live in a shabby but picturesque cottage in a charming, minuscle village, subsist on toasted dandelions and homemade wine, and write my days away. It would be a plan insane to anyone else but fellow writers.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everyone should read before they die?

PH: Maus by Art Spiegelman and Noli Me Tangere by Dr. Jose Rizal. Without at least a glance backward, we are devastatingly blind. The future is out of the question. We do it no favors by disrespect to what has already transpired. Lest we repeat the same mistakes.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

PH: At this very moment, three ladies popped into my mind:first there was my mama, who I have earliest memories of patiently reading to me from well-worn Golden Books. I also remember my fourth grade teacher Miss Ellis. My god, she scared me with her steel wool hair and her strict ways! But at years end, when my family and I were moving away to the Philippines, Miss Ellis gifted me with Carlo Collidi's "Adventures of Pinocchio." 

That book was my security blanket for my first homesick year. Then there was Bea, my mother-goddess, free-spirit, one-woman-fan club at the advent of my adult writing journey. She would supply exactly what was needed at the perfect moment: no nonsense advice, praise (even for the laziest and smarmiest of my writing endeavors!), and feedback. 

Oh, and Iyanla Vanzant! I mustn't forget. Bea was a big fan of quoting Iyanla Vanzant. I think those wise, wild woman ideas still stubbornly find their selves wedged between my words.

P: Describe yourself in three words.

PH: Incorrigible. Transparent. Real.

P: Is there one quote from a writer or otherwise that sums you up?

PH: "A mind lively and at ease, can do with seeing nothing, and can see nothing that does not answer." Jane Austen

P: Favourite music to write and/or read to?

PH: Almost everything! Disney tunes, showtunes, no kidding. Right now, the Hamilton Mixtapes.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

PH: "Sit down, everyone, and let me tell you a story..."

P: Is there anything else you would like us to know about you/your work/your social media accounts?

PH: I'm trying to share my writing world with the "real" world, a teensy bit at a time. I can be found lurking on Instagram (@phynne_belle), Twitter ( @PhynneBelle) and Facebook (@PhynneBelle and @WeAreWordWeavers). I've got a little bit of a theme going there, eh?

Thanks to PhynneBelle for letting us in. You know what happens now. Follow her, interact, like and all that business. Do YOU want to be featured? We’re running low on victims (I mean participants). Do you want to find out about another Proser and wish to volunteer them up for scrutiny? Then send us a message on info@theprose.com

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Written by Prose
Friday Feature: @PhynneBelle
Well, lovely Prosers; it’s that day of the week again. It’s Friday. Huzzah! So that means that we peek behind the doors of a Proser that we may or may not know. This week we head to the awesome city of San Francisco (my favourite American city – PaulDChambers) to find out all about a lady that lies behind the sobriquet of @PhynneBelle

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
PH: Hallo Prosers! Some of you may know you me as Trish, but many of you know me by the moniker PhynneBelle. If you're nice, I'll even respond to Fish or Phone Bell.

P: Where do you live?
PH: I have lived in the San Francisco Bay Area, home of the Six Gallery and the Friday Poet's Salon for the past twenty-sixish years.

P: What is your occupation?
PH: I champion the cause of helpless furballs everywhere! I work in general medicine veterinary practice.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
PH: Writing and I have been tempestuous lovers through many long years. Yes, I think that's a good way to visualize it. Perhaps we started out as very peripheral acquaintances while I had other creative outlets as affairs--intense infatuations with visual art and fashion, passion-filled dalliances with dance--but expressing and making order of my energetic, sometimes frenetic thoughts and ideas in poetic form has always been this constant, this very sane and centered solitude to which I return.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
PH: In reading, even genres and stories to which one would normally not be drawn, especially these initially "undesirable" topics or ideas, one's tastes are imperceptibly shaped. The interest is suddenly expanded or constricted to a very definite preference. For me, this easily parlayed into how I approach my own writing; there is an intuitive purveyor of sorts that shapes voice, story, direction, style.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
PH: Is there every any predictability when comes to my writing? For better or worse, I write what the very moment whispers in my ear. Or what tends to wake me in the middle of the night, insisting on being heard and faithfully recorded. I admit I am being seduced once more into the genius of eloquence within brevity--I'd like to revisit there, see where it will lead. A peculiar notion (peculiar to me at least) popped in a few weeks ago to try out something episodic, something narrative, drawing on non-sequential recollections with a uniting element.

P: What do you love about Prose?
PH: The endless corridors and turns where I happen upon talented new writers. I have yet to discover everyone and that is both maddening and exciting! The like-minded friends I have made; I doubt I will meet a Proser that would be astonished should I ever decide to run away from my daily life, live in a shabby but picturesque cottage in a charming, minuscle village, subsist on toasted dandelions and homemade wine, and write my days away. It would be a plan insane to anyone else but fellow writers.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everyone should read before they die?
PH: Maus by Art Spiegelman and Noli Me Tangere by Dr. Jose Rizal. Without at least a glance backward, we are devastatingly blind. The future is out of the question. We do it no favors by disrespect to what has already transpired. Lest we repeat the same mistakes.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
PH: At this very moment, three ladies popped into my mind:first there was my mama, who I have earliest memories of patiently reading to me from well-worn Golden Books. I also remember my fourth grade teacher Miss Ellis. My god, she scared me with her steel wool hair and her strict ways! But at years end, when my family and I were moving away to the Philippines, Miss Ellis gifted me with Carlo Collidi's "Adventures of Pinocchio." 

That book was my security blanket for my first homesick year. Then there was Bea, my mother-goddess, free-spirit, one-woman-fan club at the advent of my adult writing journey. She would supply exactly what was needed at the perfect moment: no nonsense advice, praise (even for the laziest and smarmiest of my writing endeavors!), and feedback. 

Oh, and Iyanla Vanzant! I mustn't forget. Bea was a big fan of quoting Iyanla Vanzant. I think those wise, wild woman ideas still stubbornly find their selves wedged between my words.

P: Describe yourself in three words.
PH: Incorrigible. Transparent. Real.

P: Is there one quote from a writer or otherwise that sums you up?
PH: "A mind lively and at ease, can do with seeing nothing, and can see nothing that does not answer." Jane Austen

P: Favourite music to write and/or read to?
PH: Almost everything! Disney tunes, showtunes, no kidding. Right now, the Hamilton Mixtapes.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
PH: "Sit down, everyone, and let me tell you a story..."

P: Is there anything else you would like us to know about you/your work/your social media accounts?
PH: I'm trying to share my writing world with the "real" world, a teensy bit at a time. I can be found lurking on Instagram (@phynne_belle), Twitter ( @PhynneBelle) and Facebook (@PhynneBelle and @WeAreWordWeavers). I've got a little bit of a theme going there, eh?

Thanks to PhynneBelle for letting us in. You know what happens now. Follow her, interact, like and all that business. Do YOU want to be featured? We’re running low on victims (I mean participants). Do you want to find out about another Proser and wish to volunteer them up for scrutiny? Then send us a message on info@theprose.com

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Two Drops of Ink

Two Drops of Ink: The Literary Home for Collaborative Writing

Mission Statement

We are here for the reader and the writer:

Two Drops of Ink staff members work hard every day to provide illuminating, informative, and unique information for aspiring writers and established writers. We also wish to provide our readers interesting posts in all of the major genres. If you have a request, please email us at twodropsofink@gmail.com

About our blog

Two Drops of Ink is a literary blog devoted to literature and writing in a broad sense. For the reader and writer, we publish short stories, poetry, essays, literary criticism, book reviews, and biographical profiles of authors, interviews, letters, and academic essays or treatise.

For the writer, we strive to publish thoughtful and unique conversations about grammar, writing, prose styles, poetry, literary genres, writing advice, and the publication industry; we post current news and information about the publishing industry and literary agents, regularly.We also promote other sites that we feel enhance the education of writers.

We believe in the power of collaboration. We look forward to publishing works from aspiring writers who are looking for exposure, and seasoned writers and authors looking to expand their audience. We know that those writers who submit their works for publication to our site, and make the cut, will enter into a win-win relationship with Two Drops of Ink. Those authors will receive the benefit of great exposure from a credible site, and we will enjoy the benefit of sharing their audience as well (Win-win).

In January of 2016, we were honored to be added to the list of top 100 blogs for writers.

In January of 2017, we were recognized and awarded for being in the top 50 writers blogs of 2017. 

For information about submissions, visit our submissions page and read our requirements. Feel free to ask questions, or to email the editor: twodropsofink@gmail.com  

Come and give our Facebook page a “like.” 

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Juice
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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Two Drops of Ink
Two Drops of Ink: The Literary Home for Collaborative Writing

Mission Statement
We are here for the reader and the writer:
Two Drops of Ink staff members work hard every day to provide illuminating, informative, and unique information for aspiring writers and established writers. We also wish to provide our readers interesting posts in all of the major genres. If you have a request, please email us at twodropsofink@gmail.com

About our blog
Two Drops of Ink is a literary blog devoted to literature and writing in a broad sense. For the reader and writer, we publish short stories, poetry, essays, literary criticism, book reviews, and biographical profiles of authors, interviews, letters, and academic essays or treatise.

For the writer, we strive to publish thoughtful and unique conversations about grammar, writing, prose styles, poetry, literary genres, writing advice, and the publication industry; we post current news and information about the publishing industry and literary agents, regularly.We also promote other sites that we feel enhance the education of writers.
We believe in the power of collaboration. We look forward to publishing works from aspiring writers who are looking for exposure, and seasoned writers and authors looking to expand their audience. We know that those writers who submit their works for publication to our site, and make the cut, will enter into a win-win relationship with Two Drops of Ink. Those authors will receive the benefit of great exposure from a credible site, and we will enjoy the benefit of sharing their audience as well (Win-win).

In January of 2016, we were honored to be added to the list of top 100 blogs for writers.
In January of 2017, we were recognized and awarded for being in the top 50 writers blogs of 2017. 

For information about submissions, visit our submissions page and read our requirements. Feel free to ask questions, or to email the editor: twodropsofink@gmail.com  

Come and give our Facebook page a “like.” 
#blog  #Itslit  #getlit  #Promo  #TwoDrops 
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