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Friday Feature: @JayChimera

It’s Friday, a day when there is definitely nothing else of importance happening in the world. Not today. It’s all about Prose today. So let’s roll out the fabulous Feature Friday thang and get our noses into someone else’s business. We head for beautiful Scotland this week to meet and drink whisky with a bonnie wee lassie (and other lazy stereotypical imagery). Ladies, Gentlemen and those in between, meet @JayChimera

P: What, prey tell, is your name, Proser?

J: My name is Jackie but I do prefer Jay. My real full name has always bothered me. My Proser name is JayChimera. Not like the Greek mythical fire breathing beast. More like an illusion or a fabrication of the mind.

P: Where do you live?

J: I live in the centre of Edinburgh in Scotland in the U.K. (The Athens of the North) It's a very pretty city, there's so much history, a big castle and home to the Fringe festival which is the largest arts festival in the world.

P: What is your occupation?

J: I am an assistant manager/supervisor in a hotel/restaurant in the centre of Edinburgh. I look after guests as they arrive for breakfast and supply them with lots of tea and coffee. I have been in the hospitality industry for the best part of ten years now. I'm a qualified chef too.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

J: Well, the first time I ever put pen to paper was when I was 14 years old. It was a dark time in my life and I spent a lot of it on my own. I had to express myself, to let go of all my anger. So I would write. There's always been a dark emotional element to my writing, really deep and personal. I found that words can be an escape and can be used as a good therapy tool. Growing up, I knew I always wanted to write and to this day I'm still working on the relationship between me and words. I'm still improving myself as a writer.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

J: For me, reading was never really my strong point. But over the past few years I've gained an understanding that reading is essential for a writer. Reading other works by similar authors and especially other Prosers has gave me so much inspiration and also motivation too. As a hobby I read about the Buddhist culture and mindfulness which I have read about for many years now. This helps me gain a healthy perspective on life and think about how writing is my path to a happy and healthy future.

P: Can you describe your current and future literary ventures?

J: So, right now I am trying to write every day. A hectic work schedule can mentally drain me so writing some days can be a struggle. Currently writing some poetry for an open mic competition I could be competing in at the end of the month and starting to get the ball rolling on my homemade project and self-publish my own poetry. An idea for a novel is brewing but idle in my mind and I'm keeping an eye out for those prose challenges.

P: What do you love about Prose?

J: The Prosers are an incredible bunch of people. I've never felt more accepted and honoured to be part of a writing community that doesn't judge or hate. It's a beautiful place to be and for that I am truly grateful for the creators and the work they've put into making this a wonderful place.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

J: This is quite tough. It's either Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig or Love is Not Enough by Tom Weaver. Matt's book is about the struggles with depression and anxiety but it's light-hearted and can help a person understand what it's like for another person to deal with these kind of situations. As dealing with these situations myself it's a very important book in my life. Tom's book is one that isn't sitting on a shelf in Waterstones but rather a small book of song lyrics and spoken word full of heartbreak and anger. He is the lead singer of a band called Casey and has been a big inspiration to me. His first song Hell was astoundingly beautiful. At the time of it's release I found myself heartbroken and stumped for words to express the way I felt. As soon as I heard that song I was floored. The way he writes is emotionally moving and still he continues to impress and inspire me.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

J: Not particularly. I'm the writer of the family and hadn't ever looked up to any type of writer or idol when I was younger. My words were mine and I had always been proud of that. My muses are the people in and out of my life, my heart and my own mind.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

J: Reserved, mindful, lonely.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

J: This doesn't necessarily sum me up but it's my favourite quote by the Buddha himself.

"We are shaped by our thoughts, we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

P: Favourite music to write and/or read to?

J: I have a few artists that are so inspiring.

Ludovico Einaudi - A pianist. A modern twist on classical music.

Slow Meadow - Incredible instrumental music, orchestra, violin, piano. I recommend you just sit back and listen.

I listen to a lot of meditation/ambient/chillout music which can help your mind, body and soul relax which leads to a better outcome when writing.

Music is a massive part of my life. I'm a bit of a hardcore emo kid if you will. Heavy rock and metal is my go to for when I feel the need to let go. Most people don't know it but when those men jump around on a stage and scream into a microphone they are exposing their deepest self. Their souls are laid bare within their words and their minds are just like any other writers. Their art is music and when they write it is as much as a part of the listener as it is them. A lot of my inspiration comes from lyrics and emotional guitars.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

J: Take this pen and this piece of paper.

How do you feel? Write it down. Write from the heart. Write about what's real.

P: Do you have a local Indie Bookstore we could approach for our ongoing feature?

J: I live five minutes from the Scottish Poetry Library in the centre of Edinburgh. It's such a niche little place and is full of wonderful poetry books by old and new authors. They have event nights which can see published writers and non-published writers come together to listen to spoken word or poetry. They hold evenings where you can speak to published authors about their work, classes on writing your own poetry. They sometimes have live music, free wine and local poets mic nights. At the moment they are getting ready to celebrate burns night where writers will come together to celebrate the works of Robert Burns.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

J: I promote my work on twitter. @JayChimeraWrite

Peace and love. X

Awesome stuff, once again. Thanks to JayChimera for her answers. You know what happens now. Follow her, interact, like and all that business. Do YOU want to be featured? Do you want to find out about another Proser and wish to volunteer them? Then send us a message on info@theprose.com

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @JayChimera
It’s Friday, a day when there is definitely nothing else of importance happening in the world. Not today. It’s all about Prose today. So let’s roll out the fabulous Feature Friday thang and get our noses into someone else’s business. We head for beautiful Scotland this week to meet and drink whisky with a bonnie wee lassie (and other lazy stereotypical imagery). Ladies, Gentlemen and those in between, meet @JayChimera

P: What, prey tell, is your name, Proser?
J: My name is Jackie but I do prefer Jay. My real full name has always bothered me. My Proser name is JayChimera. Not like the Greek mythical fire breathing beast. More like an illusion or a fabrication of the mind.

P: Where do you live?
J: I live in the centre of Edinburgh in Scotland in the U.K. (The Athens of the North) It's a very pretty city, there's so much history, a big castle and home to the Fringe festival which is the largest arts festival in the world.

P: What is your occupation?
J: I am an assistant manager/supervisor in a hotel/restaurant in the centre of Edinburgh. I look after guests as they arrive for breakfast and supply them with lots of tea and coffee. I have been in the hospitality industry for the best part of ten years now. I'm a qualified chef too.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
J: Well, the first time I ever put pen to paper was when I was 14 years old. It was a dark time in my life and I spent a lot of it on my own. I had to express myself, to let go of all my anger. So I would write. There's always been a dark emotional element to my writing, really deep and personal. I found that words can be an escape and can be used as a good therapy tool. Growing up, I knew I always wanted to write and to this day I'm still working on the relationship between me and words. I'm still improving myself as a writer.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
J: For me, reading was never really my strong point. But over the past few years I've gained an understanding that reading is essential for a writer. Reading other works by similar authors and especially other Prosers has gave me so much inspiration and also motivation too. As a hobby I read about the Buddhist culture and mindfulness which I have read about for many years now. This helps me gain a healthy perspective on life and think about how writing is my path to a happy and healthy future.

P: Can you describe your current and future literary ventures?
J: So, right now I am trying to write every day. A hectic work schedule can mentally drain me so writing some days can be a struggle. Currently writing some poetry for an open mic competition I could be competing in at the end of the month and starting to get the ball rolling on my homemade project and self-publish my own poetry. An idea for a novel is brewing but idle in my mind and I'm keeping an eye out for those prose challenges.

P: What do you love about Prose?
J: The Prosers are an incredible bunch of people. I've never felt more accepted and honoured to be part of a writing community that doesn't judge or hate. It's a beautiful place to be and for that I am truly grateful for the creators and the work they've put into making this a wonderful place.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
J: This is quite tough. It's either Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig or Love is Not Enough by Tom Weaver. Matt's book is about the struggles with depression and anxiety but it's light-hearted and can help a person understand what it's like for another person to deal with these kind of situations. As dealing with these situations myself it's a very important book in my life. Tom's book is one that isn't sitting on a shelf in Waterstones but rather a small book of song lyrics and spoken word full of heartbreak and anger. He is the lead singer of a band called Casey and has been a big inspiration to me. His first song Hell was astoundingly beautiful. At the time of it's release I found myself heartbroken and stumped for words to express the way I felt. As soon as I heard that song I was floored. The way he writes is emotionally moving and still he continues to impress and inspire me.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
J: Not particularly. I'm the writer of the family and hadn't ever looked up to any type of writer or idol when I was younger. My words were mine and I had always been proud of that. My muses are the people in and out of my life, my heart and my own mind.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
J: Reserved, mindful, lonely.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
J: This doesn't necessarily sum me up but it's my favourite quote by the Buddha himself.
"We are shaped by our thoughts, we become what we think. When the mind is pure, joy follows like a shadow that never leaves."

P: Favourite music to write and/or read to?
J: I have a few artists that are so inspiring.

Ludovico Einaudi - A pianist. A modern twist on classical music.

Slow Meadow - Incredible instrumental music, orchestra, violin, piano. I recommend you just sit back and listen.

I listen to a lot of meditation/ambient/chillout music which can help your mind, body and soul relax which leads to a better outcome when writing.

Music is a massive part of my life. I'm a bit of a hardcore emo kid if you will. Heavy rock and metal is my go to for when I feel the need to let go. Most people don't know it but when those men jump around on a stage and scream into a microphone they are exposing their deepest self. Their souls are laid bare within their words and their minds are just like any other writers. Their art is music and when they write it is as much as a part of the listener as it is them. A lot of my inspiration comes from lyrics and emotional guitars.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
J: Take this pen and this piece of paper.

How do you feel? Write it down. Write from the heart. Write about what's real.

P: Do you have a local Indie Bookstore we could approach for our ongoing feature?
J: I live five minutes from the Scottish Poetry Library in the centre of Edinburgh. It's such a niche little place and is full of wonderful poetry books by old and new authors. They have event nights which can see published writers and non-published writers come together to listen to spoken word or poetry. They hold evenings where you can speak to published authors about their work, classes on writing your own poetry. They sometimes have live music, free wine and local poets mic nights. At the moment they are getting ready to celebrate burns night where writers will come together to celebrate the works of Robert Burns.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
J: I promote my work on twitter. @JayChimeraWrite
Peace and love. X

Awesome stuff, once again. Thanks to JayChimera for her answers. You know what happens now. Follow her, interact, like and all that business. Do YOU want to be featured? Do you want to find out about another Proser and wish to volunteer them? Then send us a message on info@theprose.com

#nonfiction  #news  #culture  #FF  #FridayFeature 
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Juice Me Up.

Morning, Prosers,

We interrupt your usual Prosing schedule to bring you news of our latest feature update.

As of right now, we have implemented a feature in which ALL Prosers can earn coins.

All posts now have a new button. Juice. This Juice button allows fellow Prosers to tip your words. Have you ever read a piece and thought, “Damn, that’s good?” Well now, when you do, you can show your appreciation above and beyond a like or a comment, and send them some Juice.

Prosers can donate between 10 and 10,000 coins per post to the author. Authors receive 80% royalties which will be deposited straight into the wallet of said author.

Received donations can be viewed in the “Sales History” tab on the website.

This feature is currently only available on the website. However, we are working on bringing this to iOS as we speak. Remember, you can spend your coins on both platforms, but you can only buy coins on the web. 

Once we have updated the iOS version to reflect the Juice button, push notifications to alert you of kind donations will be active.

We will also be adding a Juice button to profiles in the not-so-distant future.

Not only this, but we have also banished a number of pesky bugs too. Be gone, and good riddance!

We are working on a number of new things to keep us busy, but as always, if something isn’t working how it should be or if you have any questions, get in touch with us. We are always happy to help!

Until next time, Prosers,

Get Juicing.

Prose. 

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Juice Me Up.
Morning, Prosers,

We interrupt your usual Prosing schedule to bring you news of our latest feature update.

As of right now, we have implemented a feature in which ALL Prosers can earn coins.

All posts now have a new button. Juice. This Juice button allows fellow Prosers to tip your words. Have you ever read a piece and thought, “Damn, that’s good?” Well now, when you do, you can show your appreciation above and beyond a like or a comment, and send them some Juice.

Prosers can donate between 10 and 10,000 coins per post to the author. Authors receive 80% royalties which will be deposited straight into the wallet of said author.

Received donations can be viewed in the “Sales History” tab on the website.

This feature is currently only available on the website. However, we are working on bringing this to iOS as we speak. Remember, you can spend your coins on both platforms, but you can only buy coins on the web. 

Once we have updated the iOS version to reflect the Juice button, push notifications to alert you of kind donations will be active.

We will also be adding a Juice button to profiles in the not-so-distant future.

Not only this, but we have also banished a number of pesky bugs too. Be gone, and good riddance!

We are working on a number of new things to keep us busy, but as always, if something isn’t working how it should be or if you have any questions, get in touch with us. We are always happy to help!

Until next time, Prosers,

Get Juicing.

Prose. 
#Announcement  #introducing  #getlit  #Juiced  #Juice 
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Prose Challenge of the Week #55

Pssstttt...

Prosers. It's back!!!

It went on hiatus and now it's back and better than ever. It's only Prose Challenge of the Week #55.

This week we will be doubling the prize fund and the length of time you have to win it. Yes, that's right, the Challenge of the Week is going to be worth $200 and will run for two weeks.

After these two weeks, we will return with a weekly prompt and a prize fund of $100.

So, let's take a look at how you can get your hands on the prize...

Challenge of the Week #55: Write a story of 200 words or more about a stranger. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $200. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

200 words (or more) for 200 big ones. That's $1 per word. Easy right?

Put your pens to digital paper and get entering the first Prose Challenge of the Week 2017.

Here's to big and bold things.

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Prose Challenge of the Week #55
Pssstttt...

Prosers. It's back!!!

It went on hiatus and now it's back and better than ever. It's only Prose Challenge of the Week #55.

This week we will be doubling the prize fund and the length of time you have to win it. Yes, that's right, the Challenge of the Week is going to be worth $200 and will run for two weeks.

After these two weeks, we will return with a weekly prompt and a prize fund of $100.

So, let's take a look at how you can get your hands on the prize...

Challenge of the Week #55: Write a story of 200 words or more about a stranger. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $200. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

200 words (or more) for 200 big ones. That's $1 per word. Easy right?

Put your pens to digital paper and get entering the first Prose Challenge of the Week 2017.

Here's to big and bold things.

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.
#prosechallenge  #challengeoftheweek  #CotW  #Itslit  #getlit 
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Friday Feature: @Dark

It’s that magical day once again. It’s bloody Friday. Which means we bash down doors with our Friday Feature battering ram once again and root through the memories and thoughts of another Proser. This week we are lucky enough to have the bright ray of sunshine that is the one and only @Dark

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

D: Mark is the name my parents assigned, the sound a hairlip dog makes. I go by Dark on Prose, mainly due to my perspective on life and the human conditions I experience and observe.

I have been called a pessimist, but I argue a realist. It is not an overt intention to be maudlin, melancholy, and Dark, but simply how I am. I do find beauty in much of life, although I am more in tune with the shadows walking hand in hand.

P: Where do you live?

D: I am a third generation Colorado native. Most of life saw me haunting the suburbs of Denver, but I now reside high up in the Rockies in a small town just outside Glenwood Springs, home of the world's largest natural hot springs pool. Open year round alongside the banks of the Colorado River, the pool harnesses 3.5 million gallons of mineral rich waters bubbling up from the earth's core EVERY DAY.

P: What is your occupation?

D: Currently I am the In-school Suspension Supervisor at a local middle school, which means I spend my days monitoring the behavior and productivity of the somewhat less than cream of the crop students. Before this, though, I taught high school English for many years. During that tenure, I coached, directed the school plays, and drove the bus to activities and events. I have also worked in business management, traveled as a consultant, landscaped, and even given drum lessons.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

D: Like all relationships, mine with writing is a messy and complicated one. I have always written with relative ease (not to be mistaken for having written well), but not to the liking of some. A college professor crucified everything I ever put to paper, and to this day I find myself fearful of what Charlie Meyer would say. A wife once berated my efforts so vehemently that I quit writing altogether for several years.

In pushing myself to improve, my OCD will kick down the door and I will agonize over and scrutinize every word or construction searching for the Holy Grail of composition. When having not written for some time, the congealed clog of ideas and thoughts become so impacted that an authorial enema ensues. Most of it gets flushed, but a few choice nuggets might cling.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

D: As a kid, reading allowed me that escape that everyone speaks of. I wish I had held onto it so much tighter through the years as less innocent avenues of escape were travelled. Now in the "winter of my discontent," it is once again a warm and safe place in which to retreat.

Professionally, my writing has provided prominence in every venture, especially education. Being able to "do" as well as "teach" was critical to my success. I wrote and delivered speeches for countless occasions from Veteran's Day ceremonies to National Honor Society Inductions to Commencement. My students were perennially ranked in the top of annual state assessments because they felt confident that I knew what I was doing and had their back.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

D: Not being a literary luminary like so many here, my current ventures are reserved exclusively for Prosers. Future posts probably wont vary greatly from previous ones - sorry. Actually, new posts may be a bit lighter as I am on new meds.

P: What do you love about Prose? Practically everything; Diverse formats and genres, creative challenges and nonjudgmental support. The pride and quality that went into the inception of Prose is evident at every turn, and invites pride and quality from our community, free from censorship.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

D: Nope. They have to read at least four. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe and Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton for their humanity and its destruction. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein for its all-consuming desperation - on many levels, and Fahrenheit 451 for Bradbury's almost psychic look into a future without books.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

D: Not really - they have just always been part of me.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

D: "Life is Suffering." This is the First Noble Truth of Buddhism. All aspects of life - birth, aging, illness, union with what is displeasing, separation from what is pleasing, not getting what we want, death - is suffering, either for us or for those in our circle of influence.

The good news is that the Second Noble Truth allows us to identify the origin of our suffering and take steps to mediate it. So when taken at face value, those three words are quite bleak, they sum up my perspective of being realistic and aware of the now.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

D: "Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." - William Shakespeare, Macbeth

P: What is your favourite music to listen to, and do you write to it?

D: I have never been able to listen to music while either reading or writing. Too much is already going on in me little ol' brainses. I do love me some Pearl Jam and Blue October, though. Fun fact: KISS was my first concert when I was around 14 and saw them again on a cruise for my 50th.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

D: "You stupid little fucks! We knew you'd let this happen! Give me a pen - "

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

D: What kind of writer wouldn't want to flood the webiverse with his musings and rantings? Me. My only internet presence is right here. Not too bright, I know, but I guess I never felt worthy of taking the next steps, whatever they may be.

Thanks muchly to Dark for answering our questions. Do we need to tell you to follow if you don’t already do so, interact and like what he does? No, of course we don’t. We’re also running low on victims to feature in future Friday Features, so stop being shy and get in touch on info@theprose.com as we want to know aaaaall about you, even if that is delivered from behind a veil of anonymity (which is just fine).

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @Dark
It’s that magical day once again. It’s bloody Friday. Which means we bash down doors with our Friday Feature battering ram once again and root through the memories and thoughts of another Proser. This week we are lucky enough to have the bright ray of sunshine that is the one and only @Dark

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
D: Mark is the name my parents assigned, the sound a hairlip dog makes. I go by Dark on Prose, mainly due to my perspective on life and the human conditions I experience and observe.

I have been called a pessimist, but I argue a realist. It is not an overt intention to be maudlin, melancholy, and Dark, but simply how I am. I do find beauty in much of life, although I am more in tune with the shadows walking hand in hand.

P: Where do you live?
D: I am a third generation Colorado native. Most of life saw me haunting the suburbs of Denver, but I now reside high up in the Rockies in a small town just outside Glenwood Springs, home of the world's largest natural hot springs pool. Open year round alongside the banks of the Colorado River, the pool harnesses 3.5 million gallons of mineral rich waters bubbling up from the earth's core EVERY DAY.

P: What is your occupation?
D: Currently I am the In-school Suspension Supervisor at a local middle school, which means I spend my days monitoring the behavior and productivity of the somewhat less than cream of the crop students. Before this, though, I taught high school English for many years. During that tenure, I coached, directed the school plays, and drove the bus to activities and events. I have also worked in business management, traveled as a consultant, landscaped, and even given drum lessons.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
D: Like all relationships, mine with writing is a messy and complicated one. I have always written with relative ease (not to be mistaken for having written well), but not to the liking of some. A college professor crucified everything I ever put to paper, and to this day I find myself fearful of what Charlie Meyer would say. A wife once berated my efforts so vehemently that I quit writing altogether for several years.

In pushing myself to improve, my OCD will kick down the door and I will agonize over and scrutinize every word or construction searching for the Holy Grail of composition. When having not written for some time, the congealed clog of ideas and thoughts become so impacted that an authorial enema ensues. Most of it gets flushed, but a few choice nuggets might cling.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
D: As a kid, reading allowed me that escape that everyone speaks of. I wish I had held onto it so much tighter through the years as less innocent avenues of escape were travelled. Now in the "winter of my discontent," it is once again a warm and safe place in which to retreat.

Professionally, my writing has provided prominence in every venture, especially education. Being able to "do" as well as "teach" was critical to my success. I wrote and delivered speeches for countless occasions from Veteran's Day ceremonies to National Honor Society Inductions to Commencement. My students were perennially ranked in the top of annual state assessments because they felt confident that I knew what I was doing and had their back.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
D: Not being a literary luminary like so many here, my current ventures are reserved exclusively for Prosers. Future posts probably wont vary greatly from previous ones - sorry. Actually, new posts may be a bit lighter as I am on new meds.

P: What do you love about Prose? Practically everything; Diverse formats and genres, creative challenges and nonjudgmental support. The pride and quality that went into the inception of Prose is evident at every turn, and invites pride and quality from our community, free from censorship.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
D: Nope. They have to read at least four. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe and Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton for their humanity and its destruction. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein for its all-consuming desperation - on many levels, and Fahrenheit 451 for Bradbury's almost psychic look into a future without books.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
D: Not really - they have just always been part of me.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
D: "Life is Suffering." This is the First Noble Truth of Buddhism. All aspects of life - birth, aging, illness, union with what is displeasing, separation from what is pleasing, not getting what we want, death - is suffering, either for us or for those in our circle of influence.

The good news is that the Second Noble Truth allows us to identify the origin of our suffering and take steps to mediate it. So when taken at face value, those three words are quite bleak, they sum up my perspective of being realistic and aware of the now.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
D: "Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." - William Shakespeare, Macbeth

P: What is your favourite music to listen to, and do you write to it?
D: I have never been able to listen to music while either reading or writing. Too much is already going on in me little ol' brainses. I do love me some Pearl Jam and Blue October, though. Fun fact: KISS was my first concert when I was around 14 and saw them again on a cruise for my 50th.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
D: "You stupid little fucks! We knew you'd let this happen! Give me a pen - "

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
D: What kind of writer wouldn't want to flood the webiverse with his musings and rantings? Me. My only internet presence is right here. Not too bright, I know, but I guess I never felt worthy of taking the next steps, whatever they may be.

Thanks muchly to Dark for answering our questions. Do we need to tell you to follow if you don’t already do so, interact and like what he does? No, of course we don’t. We’re also running low on victims to feature in future Friday Features, so stop being shy and get in touch on info@theprose.com as we want to know aaaaall about you, even if that is delivered from behind a veil of anonymity (which is just fine).

#nonfiction  #news  #opinion  #FF  #FridayFeature 
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How Prison Mums Read Stories to their kids and The Short Sentence Paradigm

Today we hear from Carrie, who has grown so much as a result of our weekly Prison Creative Workshop. She looks at how prison effects Mothers, and how they have implemented a scheme to stop families suffering; and explains why there is a revolving door on the front of the prison.

Visits in prison are very important. We are lucky to be here because the prison is very family orientated. We are encouraged to keep in contact with our family.

Where I work, (the library), we offer a free service called Storybook Mums.

The ladies read a story into a recorder, which then gets put onto a computer. It then gets cleaned by yours truly. I take out all the background noise, remove any mistakes by the reader, and remove my hints etc… Once that is done I add music and sound effects to the clean version, mix it up some and then burn it to a CD and pass it off to the relevant kids.

It is a wonderful experience for the women when they want to hear the finished version, and often tears flow.

It’s such a privilege to do this job as I’m helping to keep mums and dads stay in touch with their children.

Prison doesn’t just affect those of us inside. There is a huge ripple effect and it’s the children who suffer the most.

So big up Storybook mums and dads. Big up the two of us who create the magic for families who live apart.

Some people wonder why girls are in and out of prison like a yo-yo.

There is a very simple answer. Too many silly sentences, like 2-4 weeks long and no time to be rehabilitated. I suddenly find myself in a situation where my rehabilitation back into society has been taken away from me.

In 2014, the government passed a law stating that any prisoner who poses a flight risk or is on the escapee list, may no longer be considered for open conditions. This includes me due to an attempt to escape, but who wouldn’t try after getting 99 years? When it comes to release, prisoners like myself will be kicked out the front gates and sent on their way.

I will have served 10 plus years before I get the chance to get out. Already the world has changed whilst I’ve been stuck in this micro community! I have no idea where to start. How will I cope on public transport? Where do I go to claim my benefits? Upon release we are given a travel warrant and £47. Not much to start a whole new life with.

In some way though, I’m luckier than others because I have to stay in a hostel for ex-cons. I’ll have support to a certain degree, but I fear that one wrong move and I’ll be right back inside. Rehabilitation my arse. Where is the justice in putting us through this confinement, only to be terrified to the point where we actually want to come back to prison? It costs so much money putting and keeping us locked up, so why not use some of that money to help us!

I’d love the Secretary of State to read this blog. Some of us have changed. Some of us want to have a life outside of these walls. I have a family and a partner waiting for me. Some of my family won’t see me released. I won’t get the chance to say my final farewells. Yes, it’s a punishment I’m in here, but should I be continually punished for the rest of my life? Always looking over my shoulder? Miss Secretary of State, for the love of God, give me a bloody chance! Let me show you what rehabilitation can do for people like me. Before my life ends and I’m buried in an unmarked grave!

If you would like to read more from our Creative Writing Workshop then please join Prose for free and subscribe to the Letters From Prison Portal. We are also on Twitter as @PoetsInPrison, have a Facebook page "Letters from Prison" and we’re on Instagram also as @PoetsInPrison.

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
How Prison Mums Read Stories to their kids and The Short Sentence Paradigm
Today we hear from Carrie, who has grown so much as a result of our weekly Prison Creative Workshop. She looks at how prison effects Mothers, and how they have implemented a scheme to stop families suffering; and explains why there is a revolving door on the front of the prison.

Visits in prison are very important. We are lucky to be here because the prison is very family orientated. We are encouraged to keep in contact with our family.

Where I work, (the library), we offer a free service called Storybook Mums.

The ladies read a story into a recorder, which then gets put onto a computer. It then gets cleaned by yours truly. I take out all the background noise, remove any mistakes by the reader, and remove my hints etc… Once that is done I add music and sound effects to the clean version, mix it up some and then burn it to a CD and pass it off to the relevant kids.

It is a wonderful experience for the women when they want to hear the finished version, and often tears flow.

It’s such a privilege to do this job as I’m helping to keep mums and dads stay in touch with their children.

Prison doesn’t just affect those of us inside. There is a huge ripple effect and it’s the children who suffer the most.

So big up Storybook mums and dads. Big up the two of us who create the magic for families who live apart.

Some people wonder why girls are in and out of prison like a yo-yo.

There is a very simple answer. Too many silly sentences, like 2-4 weeks long and no time to be rehabilitated. I suddenly find myself in a situation where my rehabilitation back into society has been taken away from me.

In 2014, the government passed a law stating that any prisoner who poses a flight risk or is on the escapee list, may no longer be considered for open conditions. This includes me due to an attempt to escape, but who wouldn’t try after getting 99 years? When it comes to release, prisoners like myself will be kicked out the front gates and sent on their way.

I will have served 10 plus years before I get the chance to get out. Already the world has changed whilst I’ve been stuck in this micro community! I have no idea where to start. How will I cope on public transport? Where do I go to claim my benefits? Upon release we are given a travel warrant and £47. Not much to start a whole new life with.

In some way though, I’m luckier than others because I have to stay in a hostel for ex-cons. I’ll have support to a certain degree, but I fear that one wrong move and I’ll be right back inside. Rehabilitation my arse. Where is the justice in putting us through this confinement, only to be terrified to the point where we actually want to come back to prison? It costs so much money putting and keeping us locked up, so why not use some of that money to help us!

I’d love the Secretary of State to read this blog. Some of us have changed. Some of us want to have a life outside of these walls. I have a family and a partner waiting for me. Some of my family won’t see me released. I won’t get the chance to say my final farewells. Yes, it’s a punishment I’m in here, but should I be continually punished for the rest of my life? Always looking over my shoulder? Miss Secretary of State, for the love of God, give me a bloody chance! Let me show you what rehabilitation can do for people like me. Before my life ends and I’m buried in an unmarked grave!

If you would like to read more from our Creative Writing Workshop then please join Prose for free and subscribe to the Letters From Prison Portal. We are also on Twitter as @PoetsInPrison, have a Facebook page "Letters from Prison" and we’re on Instagram also as @PoetsInPrison.
#blog  #mondayblog  #guestblog  #LettersFromPrison  #poetsinprison 
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Innocence Lost: A Prose Original

Greetings Prosers, 

It's here! It's live! And it's time for you to find out if your entry was included in the very first Prose Original series. 

Around a month ago, we set a new Prose Challenge of the Month, whereby fifteen of you would be chosen to have your entries placed in our Prose Original book. We also announced that each winning Proser will receive 5% of all book royalties for life! 

We will be launching another Challenge of the Month if this book proves to be popular, so share the book with your family and friends and get them reading this incredible anthology. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Happy New Year to each and every one of you, let's kick 2017's ass. 

Until next time, Prosers, 

Prose. 

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Innocence Lost: A Prose Original
Greetings Prosers, 

It's here! It's live! And it's time for you to find out if your entry was included in the very first Prose Original series. 

Around a month ago, we set a new Prose Challenge of the Month, whereby fifteen of you would be chosen to have your entries placed in our Prose Original book. We also announced that each winning Proser will receive 5% of all book royalties for life! 

We will be launching another Challenge of the Month if this book proves to be popular, so share the book with your family and friends and get them reading this incredible anthology. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Happy New Year to each and every one of you, let's kick 2017's ass. 

Until next time, Prosers, 

Prose. 
#book  #books  #winners  #getlit  #CotM 
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