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Challenge of the Week #61

Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week sixty-one of the Prose Challenge of the Week, but before we unveil the winner of last week’s challenge and this week’s newest prompt, we’d like to set you all another challenge. As most of you are aware, each month we set a Challenge of the Month prompt where the winning entries get put in a Prose Original Book with each entrant getting a set share of the lifetime royalties. Last month the prompt was to write about being the most intelligent human being on earth. We have picked the winners, and are almost ready to publish the book. However, we have decided to task you creative bunch with creating the cover. If you think your creative expertise can create a Prose Original Book cover, here’s what you need to do.

1) Create a book cover with copyright-free images, with the following copy on, in this order:

Intelligence.

A Prose Original Book

Designed by @YOURUSERNAME

2) Send it along with your username to info@theprose.com

3) We will look over the entries and the top-10 designs will be featured on our blog, with the top entry being our book cover.

You have one week. Entries close 26th March 12am PST. If you snooze, you lose, but next month's challenge will give you a fresh chance to make a gorgeous cover.

We can’t wait to see the design-candy.

Right, back to the Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been writing about a new life form, and man, did you deliver. Before we check out who the deserving winner and recipient of $100 is, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #61: Write a piece of flash fiction about rejection. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week sixty.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the lifeform challenge is @DrSemicolon with their piece, Native Martian Anatomy and Physiology.

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Challenge of the Week #61
Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week sixty-one of the Prose Challenge of the Week, but before we unveil the winner of last week’s challenge and this week’s newest prompt, we’d like to set you all another challenge. As most of you are aware, each month we set a Challenge of the Month prompt where the winning entries get put in a Prose Original Book with each entrant getting a set share of the lifetime royalties. Last month the prompt was to write about being the most intelligent human being on earth. We have picked the winners, and are almost ready to publish the book. However, we have decided to task you creative bunch with creating the cover. If you think your creative expertise can create a Prose Original Book cover, here’s what you need to do.

1) Create a book cover with copyright-free images, with the following copy on, in this order:
Intelligence.
A Prose Original Book
Designed by @YOURUSERNAME
2) Send it along with your username to info@theprose.com
3) We will look over the entries and the top-10 designs will be featured on our blog, with the top entry being our book cover.

You have one week. Entries close 26th March 12am PST. If you snooze, you lose, but next month's challenge will give you a fresh chance to make a gorgeous cover.

We can’t wait to see the design-candy.

Right, back to the Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been writing about a new life form, and man, did you deliver. Before we check out who the deserving winner and recipient of $100 is, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:


Challenge of the Week #61: Write a piece of flash fiction about rejection. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week sixty.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the lifeform challenge is @DrSemicolon with their piece, Native Martian Anatomy and Physiology.

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.


#prosechallenge  #CotW  #Itslit  #getlit 
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Friday Feature: @anjaliparikh1

Friday. What a day. Full of excitement. Full of hope. Full of Friday Feature! Yezzur, it’s that time again, when we get to peek behind the scenes at another Proser’s life. This week we head to Noo Yoik and meet the lovely young woman that is Anjali. Let's do it!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

A: @anjaliparikh1

P: Where do you live?

A: New York

P: What is your occupation?

A: I am a junior in high school

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

A: I used to hate writing. I dreaded it actually, but last year i started reading a book a day because i no longer had my phone. I fell in love with different types of writing and started writing my own novel. It is 70 pages currently. I have become a better writer through reading and writing so much.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

A: I have become a better writer in English class and my vocabulary has expanded. I make a good first impression and find it easier to talk to people.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

A: A lot of my pieces are about my depression and PTSD. It shows how i have been struggling with it and how i am getting over it. You can look forward to recovery posts because I'm on my way there. It gets better.

P: What do you love about Prose?

A: Honestly... this may seem a little vain, but I like that people like my writing and tell me if it's good. I like to read other people's writing and see what's past the surface.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

A: Forgive me Leonard Peacock. It's about suicide, but it is life changing.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

A: I don't, I just went to the library one day and got out a book and I was so engaged I couldn't stop with the next book and the next.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

A: Funny, caring, and random.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

A: "I saw that you were perfect and I loved you. Then I saw you were imperfect and I loved you more."

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

A: My favorite song(s) is any musical composition by Hans Zimmer. I often write to it for inspiration, motivation, and emotion. I highly recommend any writers to listen to him when trying to convey thoughts while writing.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

A: Nothing. I would stay with them. Fight the magical creatures and die heroically. I hope everyone's answer is the same as mine!

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

A: My purple bean bag!

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

A: I guess I would like everyone to know that recovery with depression is slow but it happens. I love everyone and whoever you are out there feel free to contact me, I always want to talk.

Big thanks to Anjali for opening up to us. You all know what happens now. Follow, chat, like and love. It’s the Prose way and that's why we love you all.

Now, why are you all so shy? We need more Friday Feature victims! We’re all for parity here, so where are the lovely mixed bag of people that make up our writing community? 

Women, men, trans, gay, straight, bi, young, old, black, white, yellow, brown and all combinations of all of those and anything else, WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

Get in touch with us, please, at info@theprose.com

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Friday Feature: @anjaliparikh1
Friday. What a day. Full of excitement. Full of hope. Full of Friday Feature! Yezzur, it’s that time again, when we get to peek behind the scenes at another Proser’s life. This week we head to Noo Yoik and meet the lovely young woman that is Anjali. Let's do it!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
A: @anjaliparikh1

P: Where do you live?
A: New York

P: What is your occupation?
A: I am a junior in high school

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
A: I used to hate writing. I dreaded it actually, but last year i started reading a book a day because i no longer had my phone. I fell in love with different types of writing and started writing my own novel. It is 70 pages currently. I have become a better writer through reading and writing so much.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
A: I have become a better writer in English class and my vocabulary has expanded. I make a good first impression and find it easier to talk to people.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
A: A lot of my pieces are about my depression and PTSD. It shows how i have been struggling with it and how i am getting over it. You can look forward to recovery posts because I'm on my way there. It gets better.

P: What do you love about Prose?
A: Honestly... this may seem a little vain, but I like that people like my writing and tell me if it's good. I like to read other people's writing and see what's past the surface.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
A: Forgive me Leonard Peacock. It's about suicide, but it is life changing.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
A: I don't, I just went to the library one day and got out a book and I was so engaged I couldn't stop with the next book and the next.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
A: Funny, caring, and random.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
A: "I saw that you were perfect and I loved you. Then I saw you were imperfect and I loved you more."

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
A: My favorite song(s) is any musical composition by Hans Zimmer. I often write to it for inspiration, motivation, and emotion. I highly recommend any writers to listen to him when trying to convey thoughts while writing.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
A: Nothing. I would stay with them. Fight the magical creatures and die heroically. I hope everyone's answer is the same as mine!

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
A: My purple bean bag!

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
A: I guess I would like everyone to know that recovery with depression is slow but it happens. I love everyone and whoever you are out there feel free to contact me, I always want to talk.

Big thanks to Anjali for opening up to us. You all know what happens now. Follow, chat, like and love. It’s the Prose way and that's why we love you all.

Now, why are you all so shy? We need more Friday Feature victims! We’re all for parity here, so where are the lovely mixed bag of people that make up our writing community? 

Women, men, trans, gay, straight, bi, young, old, black, white, yellow, brown and all combinations of all of those and anything else, WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

Get in touch with us, please, at info@theprose.com

#nonfiction  #news  #culture  #FF  #FridayFeature 
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Prose Challenge of the Week #60

Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week sixty of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been rewriting one of the classic Shakespearean Sonnets, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who the deserving winner and recipient of $100 is, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #60: You have just discovered a new lifeform. Write a story of 200 words or more. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-nine.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the Shakespearean challenge is @gingkoleaf with their piece, Shall I compare you to a winter's night?

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Prose Challenge of the Week #60
Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week sixty of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been rewriting one of the classic Shakespearean Sonnets, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who the deserving winner and recipient of $100 is, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:


Challenge of the Week #60: You have just discovered a new lifeform. Write a story of 200 words or more. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit


Now, back to the winner of week fifty-nine.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the Shakespearean challenge is @gingkoleaf with their piece, Shall I compare you to a winter's night?

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!


Until next time, Prosers,


Prose.

#prosechallenge  #CotW  #Itslit  #getlit 
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Friday Feature: @EriduSerpent

Greetings Prosers. It’s that sunshine and hope filled day that is Friday. The weekend stretches out ahead of us and the possibilities are endless. But for now, that day means one thing – it’s Friday Feature time! Today we head to Europe and meet the smashing character that is @EriduSerpent

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

E: My name is Melloney, my Proser name is EriduSerpent

P: Where do you live?

E: I live in Southern Spain, in Granada, Andalucia

P: What is your occupation?

E: I was trained in the print industry, paste-up, lead type etc Then graphic art. But due to my health I am now just the villages odd English animal person/witch. I have online diplomas in general counselling, interior design and hypnotism, but I learn things then tire of them. I´m also trained in Tibetan massage and herbal medicine. I used to work around the village for donations, but got fed up of people giving me eggs as payment and telling people I was a lesbian witch. I heal with my hands and so they think I am a witch and I am single and cannot be bothered to get a boyfriend, so they assume I am gay. Which I am not, it is just Johnny Lee Miller is already happily married and Marilyn Manson is too freaky and kinky in bed, I am a lay back and let them get on with it type (while I watch tv) so he would not be interested in me. I also hate ironing and if you have a relationship it seems to entail that!

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

E: First of all I am not big on relationships so the fact that I have a very serious one with writing means I respect and love it and would not mind if I had to cook or iron for it, if need be.

It has evolved over the years from being fun to therapy, then back to fun.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

E: I barely read now, I used to a lot, mainly non-fiction, my brain craved knowledge and facts.

It was a way of dealing with stress and PTSD etc I am a greedy selfish writer, so my own work interests me more.

Now unless it is something I want to know about, most books mean nothing to me. I am lazy I watch tv instead of opening a book.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

E: I have none, I wrote a novel, two poetry books, posted them online and then felt betrayed. When they were listed as free hundreds of people downloaded them and sent me emails and reviewed them etc. I was told my novel was funny, quirky, sad and so good people did not put it down etc. But when I tried to sell it even for a pittance no one paid for it. It made me feel like people take writers for granted, they have no idea how long it can take to write a book. They do not understand the emotional process which goes to writing a book of poems, you share your inner most thoughts and feelings with the world. Agents told me my book was good but just not on a fashionable subject, they suggested I write a vampire romance or something along the lines of 50 shades (of complete cack). 

That is what sells! I did begin a vampire novel but found that I was hindered somewhat by the fact that I wanted to vomit. My daughter Fawn keeps asking me to finish it because she lurves one of the male characters named Alexander. I did have a full novel written, it was titled Black Out and about a biological weapon used in New York. I backed it up on a thumb drive, was tweaking it etc and my grandson Jesus bounced on my bed and knocked the thumb drive from my laptop…it formatted itself and never functioned again. I was pretty pissed off as when I went to try to write it again the words just would not come, the characters were flat, the scenes were bland, so I stopped trying. I have considered writing it as a screenplay for a movie but damn I am so lazy! So now I just write poems and prose, and create/post memes etc

P: What do you love about Prose?

E: I love that it is a community which does not judge, it is full of all types of writers, all colours, religions, crap writers, just meh! writers, good writers and wonderful writers.

It´s a friendly place, if you like, one could say it is a utopia for writers. I have a theory that if the world just contained poets and vegans it would be a peaceful, blissful heavenly place. Poets are calm, friendly and almost too polite for their own good…same as vegans.

I enjoy the challenges, writers can get in a rut at times, as one tends to write per how they feel mentally. If you are loved up, you write mush, if you are sad you write morbidly, etc etc.

So challenges give you an opportunity to create a new mind set. It gives you new subject matter.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

E: Anything by Dalai Lama XIV…he is a very wise man.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

E: Mr Abbot and Mr Granger in my junior school. Mr Abbot would set really cool/hard subjects to write about and Mr Granger read us Roald Dahl if we did our work quickly to round off the school day.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

E: OOOOhhhhwwwwwwwwwwwwww ummmmm…

I would like to say I am HONEST, which is true as I do not lie but I put a fake face on for people so am I really honest? I pretend to like people when really, I just do not need them, I am in fact indifferent, I do it to be polite. Also being honest causes me problems as I will say what I think if I deem it the only logical answer or reply.

Hmmmm I am PROTECTIVE for sure, if any one does me or my loved ones wrong, they will pay dearly.

SELFLESS…I am not a greedy person, I prefer to share and help others, especially animals. I am fairly low income but most of my money goes on donations to animal sanctuaries and causes. I pay to feed strays/get vet care for the animals in the village that I live in. I learnt many years ago at a time when I had a lot of money that it did not make me happy, being poorer has been more for-filling to me.

BUT others say I am: Autistic, eccentric and odd.

Others: Extremely intelligent, unsociable, and a brilliant cook...some just say "Damned scary" or call me Sheldon.

P: Is there´s one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

E: I have two on my Facebook account:

“If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.” ― Dalai Lama XIV.

I like it because it sums me up, I am just a small chubby woman but I can move mountains with my strength, my words or my voice, my knowledge, if need be. Not enough people stand up for what is right and many have excepted their role as mere sheep. I can be one mean nasty mosquito when I believe an injustice or crime has been committed.

AND

" And I'm a country you don't ever, ever, ever, ever, ever wanna visit again" ― Marilyn Manson

This because I have a dark side which I keep in check (mostly)

Take what you want from those hahaha!

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

E: I LOVE Marilyn Manson, he is very intelligent, love his voice, it makes me wobbly at the knees. I also adore Sia and Banks, I like a good strong song to sing too. I like violin and cello music, Bach for instance. I listen to Tibetan Buddhist chants and Japanese music, not the new stuff the old Edo material. But I write to none of it, as it is too much interference for my brain.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

E: I tell them nothing and ask how they store their written word and how far back does their storage go…Words do not need to be in pages of a book. Some of the best stories are told by word of mouth only. As long as one has a way to read or write, I do not really care.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

E: My huge comfy bed!

I suffer from chronic insomnia and get ill a lot so I spend a lot of time awake in bed.

My mind is most active and functional between 2 & 4am…so I tend to write a lot then, I also kick at Scrabble, Monopoly, Sudoku, Trivia quizzes etc in those hours! hahaha

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

E: I love the work of Brian Patten and Lord Byron.

I enjoy reading religious texts, such as The dead sea scrolls, bibles, The book of Enoch, Black magic books, mythological tales, conspiracy stuff, alien and weird things. I like watching scifi shows (Long live the Brown Coats) and detective shows (but I piss people off by telling them the plot before it is shown) and deep down I would have liked to have been a paid assassin preferably one using a sniper rife :o) (I love humans really) or someone like the Sherlock Holmes character.

Ummmm and after answering these questions I think I am definitely mentally unstable but just a tad!

For the record I own no guns and they do not allow them here in Spain.

We love it when a Proser really GIVES in one of these Friday Features, and she did give. You know what happens now. Be nice, follow, comment, like and be Prose-y as per usual. 

Thanks to @EriduSerpent for her time and her honesty all the way from sunny Spain!

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Friday Feature: @EriduSerpent
Greetings Prosers. It’s that sunshine and hope filled day that is Friday. The weekend stretches out ahead of us and the possibilities are endless. But for now, that day means one thing – it’s Friday Feature time! Today we head to Europe and meet the smashing character that is @EriduSerpent

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
E: My name is Melloney, my Proser name is EriduSerpent

P: Where do you live?
E: I live in Southern Spain, in Granada, Andalucia

P: What is your occupation?
E: I was trained in the print industry, paste-up, lead type etc Then graphic art. But due to my health I am now just the villages odd English animal person/witch. I have online diplomas in general counselling, interior design and hypnotism, but I learn things then tire of them. I´m also trained in Tibetan massage and herbal medicine. I used to work around the village for donations, but got fed up of people giving me eggs as payment and telling people I was a lesbian witch. I heal with my hands and so they think I am a witch and I am single and cannot be bothered to get a boyfriend, so they assume I am gay. Which I am not, it is just Johnny Lee Miller is already happily married and Marilyn Manson is too freaky and kinky in bed, I am a lay back and let them get on with it type (while I watch tv) so he would not be interested in me. I also hate ironing and if you have a relationship it seems to entail that!

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
E: First of all I am not big on relationships so the fact that I have a very serious one with writing means I respect and love it and would not mind if I had to cook or iron for it, if need be.

It has evolved over the years from being fun to therapy, then back to fun.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
E: I barely read now, I used to a lot, mainly non-fiction, my brain craved knowledge and facts.

It was a way of dealing with stress and PTSD etc I am a greedy selfish writer, so my own work interests me more.

Now unless it is something I want to know about, most books mean nothing to me. I am lazy I watch tv instead of opening a book.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
E: I have none, I wrote a novel, two poetry books, posted them online and then felt betrayed. When they were listed as free hundreds of people downloaded them and sent me emails and reviewed them etc. I was told my novel was funny, quirky, sad and so good people did not put it down etc. But when I tried to sell it even for a pittance no one paid for it. It made me feel like people take writers for granted, they have no idea how long it can take to write a book. They do not understand the emotional process which goes to writing a book of poems, you share your inner most thoughts and feelings with the world. Agents told me my book was good but just not on a fashionable subject, they suggested I write a vampire romance or something along the lines of 50 shades (of complete cack). 

That is what sells! I did begin a vampire novel but found that I was hindered somewhat by the fact that I wanted to vomit. My daughter Fawn keeps asking me to finish it because she lurves one of the male characters named Alexander. I did have a full novel written, it was titled Black Out and about a biological weapon used in New York. I backed it up on a thumb drive, was tweaking it etc and my grandson Jesus bounced on my bed and knocked the thumb drive from my laptop…it formatted itself and never functioned again. I was pretty pissed off as when I went to try to write it again the words just would not come, the characters were flat, the scenes were bland, so I stopped trying. I have considered writing it as a screenplay for a movie but damn I am so lazy! So now I just write poems and prose, and create/post memes etc

P: What do you love about Prose?
E: I love that it is a community which does not judge, it is full of all types of writers, all colours, religions, crap writers, just meh! writers, good writers and wonderful writers.
It´s a friendly place, if you like, one could say it is a utopia for writers. I have a theory that if the world just contained poets and vegans it would be a peaceful, blissful heavenly place. Poets are calm, friendly and almost too polite for their own good…same as vegans.
I enjoy the challenges, writers can get in a rut at times, as one tends to write per how they feel mentally. If you are loved up, you write mush, if you are sad you write morbidly, etc etc.

So challenges give you an opportunity to create a new mind set. It gives you new subject matter.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
E: Anything by Dalai Lama XIV…he is a very wise man.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
E: Mr Abbot and Mr Granger in my junior school. Mr Abbot would set really cool/hard subjects to write about and Mr Granger read us Roald Dahl if we did our work quickly to round off the school day.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
E: OOOOhhhhwwwwwwwwwwwwww ummmmm…

I would like to say I am HONEST, which is true as I do not lie but I put a fake face on for people so am I really honest? I pretend to like people when really, I just do not need them, I am in fact indifferent, I do it to be polite. Also being honest causes me problems as I will say what I think if I deem it the only logical answer or reply.

Hmmmm I am PROTECTIVE for sure, if any one does me or my loved ones wrong, they will pay dearly.

SELFLESS…I am not a greedy person, I prefer to share and help others, especially animals. I am fairly low income but most of my money goes on donations to animal sanctuaries and causes. I pay to feed strays/get vet care for the animals in the village that I live in. I learnt many years ago at a time when I had a lot of money that it did not make me happy, being poorer has been more for-filling to me.

BUT others say I am: Autistic, eccentric and odd.

Others: Extremely intelligent, unsociable, and a brilliant cook...some just say "Damned scary" or call me Sheldon.

P: Is there´s one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
E: I have two on my Facebook account:
“If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.” ― Dalai Lama XIV.

I like it because it sums me up, I am just a small chubby woman but I can move mountains with my strength, my words or my voice, my knowledge, if need be. Not enough people stand up for what is right and many have excepted their role as mere sheep. I can be one mean nasty mosquito when I believe an injustice or crime has been committed.

AND

" And I'm a country you don't ever, ever, ever, ever, ever wanna visit again" ― Marilyn Manson

This because I have a dark side which I keep in check (mostly)

Take what you want from those hahaha!

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
E: I LOVE Marilyn Manson, he is very intelligent, love his voice, it makes me wobbly at the knees. I also adore Sia and Banks, I like a good strong song to sing too. I like violin and cello music, Bach for instance. I listen to Tibetan Buddhist chants and Japanese music, not the new stuff the old Edo material. But I write to none of it, as it is too much interference for my brain.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
E: I tell them nothing and ask how they store their written word and how far back does their storage go…Words do not need to be in pages of a book. Some of the best stories are told by word of mouth only. As long as one has a way to read or write, I do not really care.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
E: My huge comfy bed!

I suffer from chronic insomnia and get ill a lot so I spend a lot of time awake in bed.
My mind is most active and functional between 2 & 4am…so I tend to write a lot then, I also kick at Scrabble, Monopoly, Sudoku, Trivia quizzes etc in those hours! hahaha

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
E: I love the work of Brian Patten and Lord Byron.

I enjoy reading religious texts, such as The dead sea scrolls, bibles, The book of Enoch, Black magic books, mythological tales, conspiracy stuff, alien and weird things. I like watching scifi shows (Long live the Brown Coats) and detective shows (but I piss people off by telling them the plot before it is shown) and deep down I would have liked to have been a paid assassin preferably one using a sniper rife :o) (I love humans really) or someone like the Sherlock Holmes character.

Ummmm and after answering these questions I think I am definitely mentally unstable but just a tad!

For the record I own no guns and they do not allow them here in Spain.

We love it when a Proser really GIVES in one of these Friday Features, and she did give. You know what happens now. Be nice, follow, comment, like and be Prose-y as per usual. 

Thanks to @EriduSerpent for her time and her honesty all the way from sunny Spain!

#nonfiction  #philosophy  #news  #FF  #FridayFeature 
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Prose Challenge of the Week #59

Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-nine of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week or so, you guys have been writing about injustice, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who the deserving winner, and the recipient of $150 is, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #59: Modernise Shakespeare’s ‘Shall I Compare Thee’ sonnet. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-eight.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “injustice” challenge is @MikeRich15 with their piece, Olive them, olive me.

Congratulations! You have just won $150. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Written by Prose
Prose Challenge of the Week #59
Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-nine of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week or so, you guys have been writing about injustice, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who the deserving winner, and the recipient of $150 is, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #59: Modernise Shakespeare’s ‘Shall I Compare Thee’ sonnet. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $100. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-eight.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “injustice” challenge is @MikeRich15 with their piece, Olive them, olive me.

Congratulations! You have just won $150. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.
#challenge  #prosechallenge  #Announcing  #CotW 
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Friday Feature: @Kimba

Woooohoooo! Friday is a smashing day, for it is Friday Feature day! And that, of course, means that we get up in the grill of another lovely Proser and find out all about them. This week it’s someone who you’ve probably come across and if you haven’t, you should have. It’s Proser @Kimba

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

K: My given name is Kimberley. My Proser name is Kimba.

My mom was single when she was pregnant with me. She lived with her sister, brother in-law, and 3 nephews. Every morning before school, her nephews watched an anime cartoon called "Kimba the White Lion". They begged her to name me Kimba. She ended up naming me Kimberley, but my family still calls me Kimba.

P: Where do you live?

K: I'm a Jersey Girl, through and through. New Jersey often gets a bad rap. Many liken it NY or that damned Jersey Shore show. (FYI: most of us from Jersey hate that show or watch it to laugh) I mostly grew up in Asbury Park. I lived 2 blocks from the famous Stone Pony where Bruce Springsteen got his start. Even as a child, I knew who he was before most of the world did.

P: What is your occupation?

K: I was a teacher in the medical field, until my school recently closed. It was devastating. I loved being in the classroom and helping students. I wanted to put more caring, compassionate, loving people out into the medical community.

Now, I'm currently in the process of entering school, again. I am pursuing a career as a Respiratory Therapist. I love being in the medical field. I love helping patients and their families. It keeps me humble and grounded.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

K: When I was a child, I had a very raspy voice. I used to get teased about it, quite a bit. Ink became my voice, and page allowed me to sound however I chose. I've been in love with words since discovering that magic.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

K: Well, as a teacher, reading was extremely important. It is important, from an educational standpoint. It's the foundation of all other learning.

On a personal level, it's a wonderful world full of possibilities. It can be enlightening, frightening, funny, sad, informative, adventurous....the possibilities are endless.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

K: Current literary ventures? As of late, they've consisted of text books haha. Prior to that, I often indulged in classics. Shakespeare and Jane Austen are literary gods, in my opinion. They're writing is almost lyrical, if you listen closely. Shakespeare is wrought with tragedy, but there is a beauty that only sadness holds. Austen always has a deliriously happy ending. The most profound and beautiful writes are often born from excruciating pain or an abundance of happiness. Perhaps, that's why they are my two favorites. Yin and yang, if you will.

P: What do you love about Prose?

K: My initial attraction was the reunion of friends from a previous app that is now defunct. (Hi, Kumilia! You all know who you are ❤️) But I very quickly came to meet a whole new group of brilliant writers who amaze me every day. I am constantly awed and inspired by the talent on here. It's quite humbling. I often feel like graffiti in an art gallery. But, all the Prosers have been so supportive and generous with their praise. I'm so happy to be a part of the app and I'm completely honored to have been asked to participate in Friday Feature! Me? Seriously? You wanted me? Go figure!

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

K: Memoirs of a Geisha. I know! It's not Shakespeare or Austen, but it's a fabulous book. It's so picturesque and the storyline just pulls you in. I've read it multiple times, and it gets more beautiful with each read. It's tragic and lovely and.....well, I don't want to be a spoiler.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

K: Yes! Miss Hulsart. She was my 5th and 6th grade teacher. She knew I got teased for my voice. She encouraged me to put my voice on paper. She's also one of the reasons I wanted to teach. I'm fortunate that she and I are now friends on social media.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

K: I AM FIERCE

(my Kumilia was probably expecting that haha)

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

K: There are two I hold dear to my heart. The ironic thing is, they were both originally intended as insults.

One is tattooed on my body, just under my clavicle. "Do you suppose she's a wildflower" it's from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Wildflowers can grow places other flowers can't. They overcome their surroundings to not only bloom, but to flourish.

The other is Shakespeare "and though she be but little, she is fierce" (I'm the little one in my family, but the feistiest)

I have both quotes on walls in my chick cave.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

K: I love every genre. Truly, I do. But....well.....I have 3 tattoos that are Beatles references and one that is John Lennon. I have "We all shine on" in Lennon's handwriting with is self portrait, just below the quote. I have a blackbird with a broken wing on my inside wrist. I have "Jai guru deva om" from Across the Universe. And I have "Let it Be" on a cross.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

K: I suppose I would start with "Once upon a time," as many good stories do haha. Then, I would go on to describe to them how people once created entire universes on a single piece of paper, and called it "poetry".

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

K: Yes. I have my own little "chick cave". It's very girly and pretty. It's filled with items that are uniquely me. Many of the items it housed have a story behind them. Very little about me is arbitrary, whether it's my personality or items I surround myself with.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

K: There are some on here who have me on their Facebook and/or Instagram. As much as I "put myself out there" quite a bit in Prose, I'm actually a very private person. My writes aren't for everyone, so I don't expose them to all. And my family.....well, I'm even more protective of them than I am my writes. But, if they can find me, they can add me. (How enigmatic I sound haha).

Come on, now. You know what happens now. Get on it, get following Kimba - love, share, comment and do all that stuff that makes this place the awesome place it is!

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Friday Feature: @Kimba
Woooohoooo! Friday is a smashing day, for it is Friday Feature day! And that, of course, means that we get up in the grill of another lovely Proser and find out all about them. This week it’s someone who you’ve probably come across and if you haven’t, you should have. It’s Proser @Kimba

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
K: My given name is Kimberley. My Proser name is Kimba.

My mom was single when she was pregnant with me. She lived with her sister, brother in-law, and 3 nephews. Every morning before school, her nephews watched an anime cartoon called "Kimba the White Lion". They begged her to name me Kimba. She ended up naming me Kimberley, but my family still calls me Kimba.

P: Where do you live?
K: I'm a Jersey Girl, through and through. New Jersey often gets a bad rap. Many liken it NY or that damned Jersey Shore show. (FYI: most of us from Jersey hate that show or watch it to laugh) I mostly grew up in Asbury Park. I lived 2 blocks from the famous Stone Pony where Bruce Springsteen got his start. Even as a child, I knew who he was before most of the world did.

P: What is your occupation?
K: I was a teacher in the medical field, until my school recently closed. It was devastating. I loved being in the classroom and helping students. I wanted to put more caring, compassionate, loving people out into the medical community.

Now, I'm currently in the process of entering school, again. I am pursuing a career as a Respiratory Therapist. I love being in the medical field. I love helping patients and their families. It keeps me humble and grounded.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
K: When I was a child, I had a very raspy voice. I used to get teased about it, quite a bit. Ink became my voice, and page allowed me to sound however I chose. I've been in love with words since discovering that magic.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
K: Well, as a teacher, reading was extremely important. It is important, from an educational standpoint. It's the foundation of all other learning.

On a personal level, it's a wonderful world full of possibilities. It can be enlightening, frightening, funny, sad, informative, adventurous....the possibilities are endless.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
K: Current literary ventures? As of late, they've consisted of text books haha. Prior to that, I often indulged in classics. Shakespeare and Jane Austen are literary gods, in my opinion. They're writing is almost lyrical, if you listen closely. Shakespeare is wrought with tragedy, but there is a beauty that only sadness holds. Austen always has a deliriously happy ending. The most profound and beautiful writes are often born from excruciating pain or an abundance of happiness. Perhaps, that's why they are my two favorites. Yin and yang, if you will.

P: What do you love about Prose?
K: My initial attraction was the reunion of friends from a previous app that is now defunct. (Hi, Kumilia! You all know who you are ❤️) But I very quickly came to meet a whole new group of brilliant writers who amaze me every day. I am constantly awed and inspired by the talent on here. It's quite humbling. I often feel like graffiti in an art gallery. But, all the Prosers have been so supportive and generous with their praise. I'm so happy to be a part of the app and I'm completely honored to have been asked to participate in Friday Feature! Me? Seriously? You wanted me? Go figure!

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
K: Memoirs of a Geisha. I know! It's not Shakespeare or Austen, but it's a fabulous book. It's so picturesque and the storyline just pulls you in. I've read it multiple times, and it gets more beautiful with each read. It's tragic and lovely and.....well, I don't want to be a spoiler.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
K: Yes! Miss Hulsart. She was my 5th and 6th grade teacher. She knew I got teased for my voice. She encouraged me to put my voice on paper. She's also one of the reasons I wanted to teach. I'm fortunate that she and I are now friends on social media.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
K: I AM FIERCE
(my Kumilia was probably expecting that haha)

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
K: There are two I hold dear to my heart. The ironic thing is, they were both originally intended as insults.

One is tattooed on my body, just under my clavicle. "Do you suppose she's a wildflower" it's from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Wildflowers can grow places other flowers can't. They overcome their surroundings to not only bloom, but to flourish.

The other is Shakespeare "and though she be but little, she is fierce" (I'm the little one in my family, but the feistiest)

I have both quotes on walls in my chick cave.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
K: I love every genre. Truly, I do. But....well.....I have 3 tattoos that are Beatles references and one that is John Lennon. I have "We all shine on" in Lennon's handwriting with is self portrait, just below the quote. I have a blackbird with a broken wing on my inside wrist. I have "Jai guru deva om" from Across the Universe. And I have "Let it Be" on a cross.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
K: I suppose I would start with "Once upon a time," as many good stories do haha. Then, I would go on to describe to them how people once created entire universes on a single piece of paper, and called it "poetry".

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
K: Yes. I have my own little "chick cave". It's very girly and pretty. It's filled with items that are uniquely me. Many of the items it housed have a story behind them. Very little about me is arbitrary, whether it's my personality or items I surround myself with.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
K: There are some on here who have me on their Facebook and/or Instagram. As much as I "put myself out there" quite a bit in Prose, I'm actually a very private person. My writes aren't for everyone, so I don't expose them to all. And my family.....well, I'm even more protective of them than I am my writes. But, if they can find me, they can add me. (How enigmatic I sound haha).

Come on, now. You know what happens now. Get on it, get following Kimba - love, share, comment and do all that stuff that makes this place the awesome place it is!
#FF  #prosers  #FridayFeature  #Proser  #Itslit 
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Your Words, More Powerful Than You Know

Morning, Prosers, 

Every now and then, we like to highlight the other companies from the literary sphere who share our passion for words. Today, we'd like to promote One Stop for Writers. 

Enjoy this blog and be sure to show them some literary love... 

Prose. 

Words are amazing, aren’t they? Just today I was reflecting on this and a video popped up in my Facebook feed where Off The Record TV host Michael Landsberg was opening up about an interview he did with Stéphane Richer, a retired NHL hockey player. In the interview, they’d had a short discussion on a shared struggle: depression. And while the two speaking candidly about their battle resonated deeply with viewers, it was what happened afterwards that is of note: a flood of emails thanking Michael for showing men that mental illness is okay to talk about.

One of these messages came from a viewer who was, in fact, about to commit suicide. Like others, he’d seen the segment and written to thank Michael for giving depression a voice. As he resumed his preparations, Michael responded to that email (not knowing at all what was about to transpire). It caused the man to stop long enough to read it, and then he replied.

They exchanged several emails. The man began to feel understood. He realized he had options, and chose not to go through with ending his life. He sought help, and years later, got in touch with Michael to tell him the impact of his words, and that he was here today because of them.

Powerful stuff, right? And this is why giving voice to our thoughts and ideas in writing is so important, and spending time to learn good craft, read, study, and practice is such a worthwhile pursuit.

Fiction: So Much More Than Entertainment

Some see fiction as a vehicle for pure enjoyment, but people usually read for a deeper reason: because life doesn’t come with a how-to manual.

After all, the real world can feel a bit isolating. There’s so much we don’t talk about openly. We don’t want others to think we’re clueless, lost, or maybe even a hot mess—it makes us feel vulnerable. But we also don’t always know how to navigate life’s ups and downs. Fiction gives us a safe way to experiment, and to experience hardship and struggles through another’s journey from brokenness to wholeness. And that’s important. Because really, aren’t we all a bit broken? Isn’t wholeness what we seek? I think so.

Reaching people, connecting with them though our feelings and beliefs…this is why we write. It is our passion. And learning to craft strong prose is critical as it helps us draw readers in so they share the character’s experiences as they unfold.

This is largely why Becca Puglisi (my co-author for The Emotion Thesaurus), and Lee Powell (the creator of Scrivener for Windows and Linux) created our site, One Stop For Writers. We want to support writers as they create, and help them bring their stories to life.

The three of us share a love of learning and we’re always seeking to improve our writing. But we find it a bit overwhelming because there is just so much craft advice, methods, and resources to use and only so much time to assess what we really need for our writing toolkits. So, we decided to pool our talents and create a library filled with all the things a writer really needs to write more efficiently, and craft deeper, more meaningful stories.

One Stop is unlike other sites, and we love that. It’s a bit like Prose in that regard—your creators saw a need (a way for writers to connect with readers) and set out to make it (by creating a community for sharing work using a social media-like format). One Stop is sort of the writer’s resource equivalent in that we supply tutorials, lessons, and step-by-step instructions to navigate certain difficult areas like story structure and character arc, and we pair it with powerful tools and description databases. It’s a great match, because instead of writers wasting time and effort searching the internet for help, it’s all in one place. Writers spend more time actually writing their stories.

Our site helps writers brainstorm, draft, and revise. We focus on encouraging writers to “show” the details that matter most, and so offer in-depth description thesauruses for emotion, sensory settings, weather, symbolism, character traits, talents and skills, emotional wounds, physiological features and many more. Our story boarding and structure tools include a Story Map, Scene Map, and Timeline tool—suitable for planners and pantsers because we recognize not everyone works the same. And in addition to some very unique writing worksheets & templates, our Idea Generator allows you to brainstorm useful elements like a character’s fears, secrets, emotional wounds, and even that important (yet hard to define) area of character arc: inner growth.

Our goal? Help all writers reach their potential by giving them the help and support they need to craft meaningful fiction. We want their readers to crack the page of a book and find characters so well drawn they feel like real people. (If you think this is something you might like to check out, feel free to stop by sometime. Registration is always free.)

When we write fiction, yes, we’re entertaining readers…but we’re also doing so much more. Imperfect characters who struggle make readers feel less alone. So keep, striving, Prosers! The hard work is so worth it. Fill your creative well, keep writing, and continue to fascinate readers by offering them an experience that will not be soon forgotten.

Angela Ackerman is a writing coach, international speaker, and co-author of many bestselling books, including The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression. Passionate about helping and supporting writers, Angela runs the successful blog, Writers Helping Writers, and is the co-founder of One Stop For Writers, an innovative online library built to help writers elevate their storytelling. Registration is always free, so stop by sometime if you like! 

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Your Words, More Powerful Than You Know
Morning, Prosers, 

Every now and then, we like to highlight the other companies from the literary sphere who share our passion for words. Today, we'd like to promote One Stop for Writers. 

Enjoy this blog and be sure to show them some literary love... 

Prose. 

Words are amazing, aren’t they? Just today I was reflecting on this and a video popped up in my Facebook feed where Off The Record TV host Michael Landsberg was opening up about an interview he did with Stéphane Richer, a retired NHL hockey player. In the interview, they’d had a short discussion on a shared struggle: depression. And while the two speaking candidly about their battle resonated deeply with viewers, it was what happened afterwards that is of note: a flood of emails thanking Michael for showing men that mental illness is okay to talk about.

One of these messages came from a viewer who was, in fact, about to commit suicide. Like others, he’d seen the segment and written to thank Michael for giving depression a voice. As he resumed his preparations, Michael responded to that email (not knowing at all what was about to transpire). It caused the man to stop long enough to read it, and then he replied.

They exchanged several emails. The man began to feel understood. He realized he had options, and chose not to go through with ending his life. He sought help, and years later, got in touch with Michael to tell him the impact of his words, and that he was here today because of them.

Powerful stuff, right? And this is why giving voice to our thoughts and ideas in writing is so important, and spending time to learn good craft, read, study, and practice is such a worthwhile pursuit.

Fiction: So Much More Than Entertainment

Some see fiction as a vehicle for pure enjoyment, but people usually read for a deeper reason: because life doesn’t come with a how-to manual.

After all, the real world can feel a bit isolating. There’s so much we don’t talk about openly. We don’t want others to think we’re clueless, lost, or maybe even a hot mess—it makes us feel vulnerable. But we also don’t always know how to navigate life’s ups and downs. Fiction gives us a safe way to experiment, and to experience hardship and struggles through another’s journey from brokenness to wholeness. And that’s important. Because really, aren’t we all a bit broken? Isn’t wholeness what we seek? I think so.

Reaching people, connecting with them though our feelings and beliefs…this is why we write. It is our passion. And learning to craft strong prose is critical as it helps us draw readers in so they share the character’s experiences as they unfold.

This is largely why Becca Puglisi (my co-author for The Emotion Thesaurus), and Lee Powell (the creator of Scrivener for Windows and Linux) created our site, One Stop For Writers. We want to support writers as they create, and help them bring their stories to life.

The three of us share a love of learning and we’re always seeking to improve our writing. But we find it a bit overwhelming because there is just so much craft advice, methods, and resources to use and only so much time to assess what we really need for our writing toolkits. So, we decided to pool our talents and create a library filled with all the things a writer really needs to write more efficiently, and craft deeper, more meaningful stories.
One Stop is unlike other sites, and we love that. It’s a bit like Prose in that regard—your creators saw a need (a way for writers to connect with readers) and set out to make it (by creating a community for sharing work using a social media-like format). One Stop is sort of the writer’s resource equivalent in that we supply tutorials, lessons, and step-by-step instructions to navigate certain difficult areas like story structure and character arc, and we pair it with powerful tools and description databases. It’s a great match, because instead of writers wasting time and effort searching the internet for help, it’s all in one place. Writers spend more time actually writing their stories.

Our site helps writers brainstorm, draft, and revise. We focus on encouraging writers to “show” the details that matter most, and so offer in-depth description thesauruses for emotion, sensory settings, weather, symbolism, character traits, talents and skills, emotional wounds, physiological features and many more. Our story boarding and structure tools include a Story Map, Scene Map, and Timeline tool—suitable for planners and pantsers because we recognize not everyone works the same. And in addition to some very unique writing worksheets & templates, our Idea Generator allows you to brainstorm useful elements like a character’s fears, secrets, emotional wounds, and even that important (yet hard to define) area of character arc: inner growth.

Our goal? Help all writers reach their potential by giving them the help and support they need to craft meaningful fiction. We want their readers to crack the page of a book and find characters so well drawn they feel like real people. (If you think this is something you might like to check out, feel free to stop by sometime. Registration is always free.)
When we write fiction, yes, we’re entertaining readers…but we’re also doing so much more. Imperfect characters who struggle make readers feel less alone. So keep, striving, Prosers! The hard work is so worth it. Fill your creative well, keep writing, and continue to fascinate readers by offering them an experience that will not be soon forgotten.

Angela Ackerman is a writing coach, international speaker, and co-author of many bestselling books, including The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression. Passionate about helping and supporting writers, Angela runs the successful blog, Writers Helping Writers, and is the co-founder of One Stop For Writers, an innovative online library built to help writers elevate their storytelling. Registration is always free, so stop by sometime if you like! 
#words  #blog  #OneStop  #ProsePromo 
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Friday Feature: @Harlequin

A week has shot by once again - awesome! It’s Friday, and that means it’s time for many people’s favourite thing: Friday Feature. This week is a doozy! We meet and find out about a Proser that many are intrigued by. Ladies and Gentlemen, we give you @Harlequin

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

H: It is difficult to imagine anybody seriously naming their child “Harlequin” without laughing. However I must admit, if I ever were to have a child, it’s likely they would be cursed with something just as strange if not worse, probably to their immense embarrassment growing up. But at least I’m consistent.

Endeavoring to bring more color into the literary world, as well as illuminate some philosophies that intertwine artist and creation, I renamed myself Harlequin Grim, and I prefer to keep that the mask behind my writing. The name illustrates a recurring motif in my life that intrigues me endlessly: the tricky dance of persisting within dualistic natures constantly affecting our lives. Inspired, empty, living, dying, etc.

On Prose, it is simply Harlequin.

P: Where do you live?

H: I reside in Portland, Oregon, where it doesn’t ever seem to stop raining, and the trees, consequently, are ever sprouting. Moving here was a hasty retreat from its antithesis: Southern California, where I grew up.

P: What is your occupation?

H: I wish I could say what pays for my expenses is a job related to literature, or at least a professional gig as a court jester, but the former is in development while the latter is outdated by a handful of centuries (I really missed the boat). Although I write as much as I attend my day job, currently I work at a quaint neighborhood café, pulling shots from an espresso machine that is nearly triple my age. At home, I push my sleep schedule to its edges, pursuing my writing after the daily rush.

Oh gods … I’m a cliché, aren’t I?

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

H: Devout. Multiple times since I started, I have attempted to distance myself from writing, only to be stunned by how it seemed integral to me living happily. It became a blessing as well as a curse, something positively affixed to me. Overtime, it has become more and more difficult to imagine a life without stories constantly evolving in the back of my head. Not giving them the time to express themselves feels torturous. This isn’t all that glamorous, but if I am being entirely honest, I am more temperamental when I haven’t written in a few days.

When I was first introduced to creative writing, it was purely for the sake of escapism. As years wore on and I grew into thicker skins, my stories became less about ‘venting’ and more about expressing, reflecting, and articulating my philosophies through the actions of my characters.

Somewhere in the middle of high school, I felt an incredible desire not only to connect but to inspire, and similarly, to illustrate characters growing beyond weaknesses so as to embrace deeper strengths, more enriching perspectives. Although I cannot foretell what writing will be to me in the future, currently, my aim is to depict as many intricacies of the human condition as possible, whether they be pleasant to look at or horrifying. I attempt to illustrate what it means to struggle, to grow, to love, live and die, searching for all those cascading layers of meaning bursting between beginning and end.

Ultimately, it is an attempt to show what opportunity dwells beneath the surface of suffering, that happiness is not only within joy, nor sadness in sorrow, and art not only in deliberate acts of creation, rather that all these things interweave in patterns of perception. I choose to perceive living as an art, an opportunity not to be squandered, and writing, my preferred medium for expressing as much.

I wish to tell tales which invigorate us to live as we would craft our characters, in a journey of actualization through conscious living.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

H: Since I see living as a kind of seamless art, it is all quite personal, and since I aim to make it my profession—quite professional. So, any answer will be one and the same.

More superficially, I find I am more articulate during sprees of reading. Typically, after I close a book, I feel more cognizant of subtle details around me. As a result, I challenge myself to be more meticulous with how I speak and act. It helps me envision myself as a protagonist instead of a lost soul.

Beyond that, I do not entertain any delusions of being particularly brilliant or innovative, so whenever I pick up a book, I am hoping to have my expectations pushed, my truths questioned. Simply, to learn. It would be something of a pity to pick up a book for the sake of reinforcing old patterns of thinking.

Perhaps most importantly, it helps me observe through another pair of eyes. It coaxes me from the dusty corners of my own head to instead indulge in another author’s interpretations of reality, making the world that much more dynamic. I suffer greatly from a lack of originality; the works of other artists are crucial to feeding imagination.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

H: Last Halloween I published a fantasy novel, The Lupine Curse, through Amazon. Although I was incredibly excited to have a fully developed work prancing about on the internet for the first time, even before I was finished editing that piece, I was already working on another.

Recently, one of my short stories won a weekly contest through Prose about tyranny. The story was entitled The Remedy. Little did everyone know, it was not a short story at all, but the first chapter of my next novel: The Culling of Casimir! If you will be so polite, kindly imagine maniacal laughter behind that sentence, but ignore the ensuing, embarrassing fit of coughing. Consider yourself playfully deceived, and hopefully excited, since I will be posting the novel by chapters, every Saturday via Prose, starting February 25th. If you read The Remedy, you can imagine how the story has little room for slow expeditions. I must warn you: I am fully determined to shackle you to the pages if you give me the slightest chance.

Aside from The Culling of Casimir, I will be compiling recent works of poetry and short fiction into books that will also become available, not only electronically, but hopefully through prints. The more support I receive, the more I can do to get physical objects of whimsy into the hands of anybody avid enough to receive them.

As always, I will be posting frequently to Prose as well as my website, unless, of course, I am hit by a bus or dragged off into the skies by a gargoyle. You’ll know I’m dead when my words stop sprouting up.

P: What do you love about Prose?

H: There is an undeniable sense of enthusiasm that the creators have for it that has ignited the community to respond in a cyclical relationship of encouraging free expression. I also enjoy the more personal interactions between writer and reader, or rather writer to writer.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

H: The Art of Possibility by Rosamund Stone and Benjamin Zander, applicable not only to writers but anyone who wants to harvest as much as they can from living. For anyone going through a period of darkness or simply looking to add more edge to their vitality, this book is indispensable, something I will read multiple times before I die

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

H: My oldest brother always had a way of coaxing out my most ridiculous fantasies, encouraging me to consider philosophies and lifestyles that were either challenging or seemingly impractical. Above all else, he encouraged me to flesh out my individuality, sacrificing conformity for personal expression.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

H: Foolish, ardent, introspective.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

H: “Life is too short not to create something with every breath we draw.” - Maynard James Keenan

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

H: My crux is seeking specific tracks to suit my mood when I am writing, which can sometimes impede the process. Since different scenes desire different songs and genres to guide the mood, my tastes are incredibly broad, but when it comes to deciding my favorite music, it would have to be the bands Puscifer, Tool, and A Perfect Circle in that order. I’d rather not reveal how many t-shirts, posters, and concert tickets I’ve collected for these groups over the years.

Also, yes! The album ‘Lateralus’ by Tool inspired me to create Fenris, the protagonist of The Lupine Curse, so I had it playing in the background for much of the writing process.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

H: “You really don’t have any books?”

“What is a book?”

“All right, everybody gather around the fire. This is going to take a while to explain. You see, it all began with …”

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

H: That place where intuition, diction, imagination and reflection merge, to create a timeless location in which it feels as if there is no writer, only characters expressing themselves with zeal, and hands to record their actions. If there was a specific location that triggered that blissful state, I would seek it out daily. But I can’t honestly say I have a favorite place, in fact, I was a little sad to find my mind blank when thinking about the question. I had to settle for some wishy washy artsy answer, instead. See?

For reading, however, I do, in fact, have a specific place. I had one arm wrapped around someone who enjoys fantasy as much as I do, the other supporting the book. After she fell asleep, I continued reading to the sound of soft snores. I haven’t stumbled across a more perfect place to read since then.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

H: Ah, it is always so heart wrenching to say farewell! No, no. There are no need for tears. This is not the end.

One of the best ways for Prosers to keep track of my recent work is through my Murder of Crows, a newsletter feature on my website. It contains short stories, articles, and other outlandish artifacts. There, you can get more involved with me … I’ll tell you secrets and such. And for more frivolous following, I have a Twitter as well.

With that, there is little else to speak of besides the tremendous, heaping mountains of golden gratitude I have for Prose. Any dragon would be envious of them. Seeing more support than I ever have before is simply enchanting. Every day, I look forward to seeing what is stirring in the vivid minds of the community. And every day, I look forward to finding more ways to feed inspiration back into it. Thank you for listening, and thank you for your curiosity.

The coming months will be another chapter in a tale, another stride in a journey, and I do sincerely hope you join me.

Fantastic stuff from Harlequin, there; thank you sir, for your candour. Time to step up and like, follow and interact, you lovely Prosers – that is if you don’t already! We’ll be back next week with another delve into the world of someone else. In the meantime – happy reading and writing!

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Friday Feature: @Harlequin
A week has shot by once again - awesome! It’s Friday, and that means it’s time for many people’s favourite thing: Friday Feature. This week is a doozy! We meet and find out about a Proser that many are intrigued by. Ladies and Gentlemen, we give you @Harlequin

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
H: It is difficult to imagine anybody seriously naming their child “Harlequin” without laughing. However I must admit, if I ever were to have a child, it’s likely they would be cursed with something just as strange if not worse, probably to their immense embarrassment growing up. But at least I’m consistent.

Endeavoring to bring more color into the literary world, as well as illuminate some philosophies that intertwine artist and creation, I renamed myself Harlequin Grim, and I prefer to keep that the mask behind my writing. The name illustrates a recurring motif in my life that intrigues me endlessly: the tricky dance of persisting within dualistic natures constantly affecting our lives. Inspired, empty, living, dying, etc.
On Prose, it is simply Harlequin.

P: Where do you live?
H: I reside in Portland, Oregon, where it doesn’t ever seem to stop raining, and the trees, consequently, are ever sprouting. Moving here was a hasty retreat from its antithesis: Southern California, where I grew up.

P: What is your occupation?
H: I wish I could say what pays for my expenses is a job related to literature, or at least a professional gig as a court jester, but the former is in development while the latter is outdated by a handful of centuries (I really missed the boat). Although I write as much as I attend my day job, currently I work at a quaint neighborhood café, pulling shots from an espresso machine that is nearly triple my age. At home, I push my sleep schedule to its edges, pursuing my writing after the daily rush.

Oh gods … I’m a cliché, aren’t I?

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
H: Devout. Multiple times since I started, I have attempted to distance myself from writing, only to be stunned by how it seemed integral to me living happily. It became a blessing as well as a curse, something positively affixed to me. Overtime, it has become more and more difficult to imagine a life without stories constantly evolving in the back of my head. Not giving them the time to express themselves feels torturous. This isn’t all that glamorous, but if I am being entirely honest, I am more temperamental when I haven’t written in a few days.

When I was first introduced to creative writing, it was purely for the sake of escapism. As years wore on and I grew into thicker skins, my stories became less about ‘venting’ and more about expressing, reflecting, and articulating my philosophies through the actions of my characters.

Somewhere in the middle of high school, I felt an incredible desire not only to connect but to inspire, and similarly, to illustrate characters growing beyond weaknesses so as to embrace deeper strengths, more enriching perspectives. Although I cannot foretell what writing will be to me in the future, currently, my aim is to depict as many intricacies of the human condition as possible, whether they be pleasant to look at or horrifying. I attempt to illustrate what it means to struggle, to grow, to love, live and die, searching for all those cascading layers of meaning bursting between beginning and end.

Ultimately, it is an attempt to show what opportunity dwells beneath the surface of suffering, that happiness is not only within joy, nor sadness in sorrow, and art not only in deliberate acts of creation, rather that all these things interweave in patterns of perception. I choose to perceive living as an art, an opportunity not to be squandered, and writing, my preferred medium for expressing as much.

I wish to tell tales which invigorate us to live as we would craft our characters, in a journey of actualization through conscious living.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
H: Since I see living as a kind of seamless art, it is all quite personal, and since I aim to make it my profession—quite professional. So, any answer will be one and the same.

More superficially, I find I am more articulate during sprees of reading. Typically, after I close a book, I feel more cognizant of subtle details around me. As a result, I challenge myself to be more meticulous with how I speak and act. It helps me envision myself as a protagonist instead of a lost soul.

Beyond that, I do not entertain any delusions of being particularly brilliant or innovative, so whenever I pick up a book, I am hoping to have my expectations pushed, my truths questioned. Simply, to learn. It would be something of a pity to pick up a book for the sake of reinforcing old patterns of thinking.

Perhaps most importantly, it helps me observe through another pair of eyes. It coaxes me from the dusty corners of my own head to instead indulge in another author’s interpretations of reality, making the world that much more dynamic. I suffer greatly from a lack of originality; the works of other artists are crucial to feeding imagination.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
H: Last Halloween I published a fantasy novel, The Lupine Curse, through Amazon. Although I was incredibly excited to have a fully developed work prancing about on the internet for the first time, even before I was finished editing that piece, I was already working on another.

Recently, one of my short stories won a weekly contest through Prose about tyranny. The story was entitled The Remedy. Little did everyone know, it was not a short story at all, but the first chapter of my next novel: The Culling of Casimir! If you will be so polite, kindly imagine maniacal laughter behind that sentence, but ignore the ensuing, embarrassing fit of coughing. Consider yourself playfully deceived, and hopefully excited, since I will be posting the novel by chapters, every Saturday via Prose, starting February 25th. If you read The Remedy, you can imagine how the story has little room for slow expeditions. I must warn you: I am fully determined to shackle you to the pages if you give me the slightest chance.

Aside from The Culling of Casimir, I will be compiling recent works of poetry and short fiction into books that will also become available, not only electronically, but hopefully through prints. The more support I receive, the more I can do to get physical objects of whimsy into the hands of anybody avid enough to receive them.

As always, I will be posting frequently to Prose as well as my website, unless, of course, I am hit by a bus or dragged off into the skies by a gargoyle. You’ll know I’m dead when my words stop sprouting up.

P: What do you love about Prose?
H: There is an undeniable sense of enthusiasm that the creators have for it that has ignited the community to respond in a cyclical relationship of encouraging free expression. I also enjoy the more personal interactions between writer and reader, or rather writer to writer.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
H: The Art of Possibility by Rosamund Stone and Benjamin Zander, applicable not only to writers but anyone who wants to harvest as much as they can from living. For anyone going through a period of darkness or simply looking to add more edge to their vitality, this book is indispensable, something I will read multiple times before I die

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
H: My oldest brother always had a way of coaxing out my most ridiculous fantasies, encouraging me to consider philosophies and lifestyles that were either challenging or seemingly impractical. Above all else, he encouraged me to flesh out my individuality, sacrificing conformity for personal expression.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
H: Foolish, ardent, introspective.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
H: “Life is too short not to create something with every breath we draw.” - Maynard James Keenan

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
H: My crux is seeking specific tracks to suit my mood when I am writing, which can sometimes impede the process. Since different scenes desire different songs and genres to guide the mood, my tastes are incredibly broad, but when it comes to deciding my favorite music, it would have to be the bands Puscifer, Tool, and A Perfect Circle in that order. I’d rather not reveal how many t-shirts, posters, and concert tickets I’ve collected for these groups over the years.

Also, yes! The album ‘Lateralus’ by Tool inspired me to create Fenris, the protagonist of The Lupine Curse, so I had it playing in the background for much of the writing process.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
H: “You really don’t have any books?”
“What is a book?”
“All right, everybody gather around the fire. This is going to take a while to explain. You see, it all began with …”

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
H: That place where intuition, diction, imagination and reflection merge, to create a timeless location in which it feels as if there is no writer, only characters expressing themselves with zeal, and hands to record their actions. If there was a specific location that triggered that blissful state, I would seek it out daily. But I can’t honestly say I have a favorite place, in fact, I was a little sad to find my mind blank when thinking about the question. I had to settle for some wishy washy artsy answer, instead. See?

For reading, however, I do, in fact, have a specific place. I had one arm wrapped around someone who enjoys fantasy as much as I do, the other supporting the book. After she fell asleep, I continued reading to the sound of soft snores. I haven’t stumbled across a more perfect place to read since then.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
H: Ah, it is always so heart wrenching to say farewell! No, no. There are no need for tears. This is not the end.

One of the best ways for Prosers to keep track of my recent work is through my Murder of Crows, a newsletter feature on my website. It contains short stories, articles, and other outlandish artifacts. There, you can get more involved with me … I’ll tell you secrets and such. And for more frivolous following, I have a Twitter as well.

With that, there is little else to speak of besides the tremendous, heaping mountains of golden gratitude I have for Prose. Any dragon would be envious of them. Seeing more support than I ever have before is simply enchanting. Every day, I look forward to seeing what is stirring in the vivid minds of the community. And every day, I look forward to finding more ways to feed inspiration back into it. Thank you for listening, and thank you for your curiosity.

The coming months will be another chapter in a tale, another stride in a journey, and I do sincerely hope you join me.

Fantastic stuff from Harlequin, there; thank you sir, for your candour. Time to step up and like, follow and interact, you lovely Prosers – that is if you don’t already! We’ll be back next week with another delve into the world of someone else. In the meantime – happy reading and writing!
#nonfiction  #adventure  #news  #opinion  #FF 
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Friday Feature: @starryEyes

So, we’ve been briefed about it and have read some articles on it and can now say it is Friday. It's not fake news, people. It’s Friday. And we’d be doing Prose a very, very big disservice if we didn’t bring you the very, very good thing that is Friday Feature. People love it. Everybody says so. They like to read about the very, very nice people of Prose...

OK, enough of that crazy talk, let’s dive in to meet the entirely lovely @starryEyes

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

S: My name is Kim, but you can find me as starryEyes on Prose.

P: Where do you live?

S: I live in the northeast United States, out in the country on top of a hill with a fantastic view. My grandfather built the house in the 1970s and I absolutely love living here with my husband. Watching the birds, animals, wild weather, and changing seasons makes me happy.

We get our Internet by antenna from a local provider who beams it over from a tower that’s 4 miles away (no cable service out here). It’s better than satellite, except when wind, rain, and foliage conspire to eat data packets!

P: What is your occupation?

S: Hmmm… I’m probably most occupied with taking care of myself. So maybe my occupation is being alive? Or surviving. But I’d prefer “thriving.” That can be my occupation: thriving.

I went to school for electrical engineering and worked for five years designing and testing radar electronics. I absolutely loved it. But chronic Lyme disease made that impossible. I’m principally afflicted by profound fatigue and brain fog, but generally have a few good hours a day.

Right now I am content. There is so much more I’d like to do in life, but I’m pleased that I’m not getting any worse right now and have a sort of rhythm of productivity, fulfillment, and rest.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

S: Growing up, I wrote for school. I enjoyed all my writing assignments but rarely wrote of my own initiative. Late in high school and college, I kept a “prayer” journal that helped me untangle my thoughts and feelings while writing to God.

As I progressed in my engineering studies and career, I wrote a lot of technical documents. It turns out I really enjoy writing lab reports, test procedures, and documenting my designs. And who doesn’t love a good table or expressive graph? *happy sigh*

The first poem I ever wrote of my own free will flowed from my illness. My choppy, foggy, scattered, and desperate thoughts needed adequate expression. I now write poetry like it’s a puzzle to be solved - conveying meaning and depth by sound & structure & few words – an artistic efficiency. It must be the engineer in me.

I started writing short stories a year ago for fun. I really haven’t written many because I’m a slow writer and I don’t often feel well. But it makes me feel human and “normal” to compose something that I’m proud of. I attend a writing group at the library and find it immensely helpful and encouraging.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

S: I’ve always been a voracious reader of fiction. It makes me happy, stirs my imagination, fills me with stories, and teaches me about life. I love gleaning bits of wisdom from book characters and pondering their thoughts and actions. It’s an easy, gentle way to learn.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

I don’t have specific posting plans, but I often respond to writing challenges. Apparently I like to write from the perspective of non-humans such as an animal, plant, or park bench, so you may see more of that. I might sometimes write about my illness or my faith in Jesus, because both deeply define who I am. My loftiest dream is to write a historical choose-your-own-adventure book for kids.

P: What do you love about Prose?

S: Challenges, challenges, challenges! I’m way more motivated when someone challenges me than when I make up my own goals. That’s probably a character flaw. But I’m getting lots of practice and inspiration from the Prose community challenges and having fun! I also like the opportunity to share what I write and interact with other writers.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

S: There are oodles of good books, so how could I choose? But limited to one, I’d have to say the Bible. I believe that how we respond to Jesus is the single most important decision in this life. To make an informed choice, we have to read his words.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

S: If so, they are extremely unsung because I can’t think of who they might be! My parents and teachers were obvious influences, but no one person or event stands out in my mind.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

S: Contemplative. Sincere. Empathetic.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

S: “In Christ alone my hope is found. He is my light, my strength, my song… And as He stands in victory, sin’s curse has lost its grip on me! For I am His, and He is mine, bought with the precious blood of Christ.”

And the entire rest of the lyrics to “In Christ Alone” written by Stuart Townsend & Keith Getty

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

S: I like pop / rock / metal. My favorite artists are Britt Nicole, Fireflight (similar to Evanescence), and Tourniquet (similar to Metallica). I also really like a cappella and folk music. I can do anything to music except read and write. For those, silence is more conducive to concentration.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

S: “You know, books. B-O-O-K-S. Like writing. On paper. That you read. There must be some. This isn’t possible. Where did you go to school? Where’s the library?” After asking the same questions twenty times but getting the same answer, I think I’d become unresponsive and curl up, rocking back and forth.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

S: Curled up in a recliner with a blanket and a cat. Preferably my own recliner and my own cat. Any blanket will do.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

S: Nothing left to tell!

Thanks so much to Kim, it was marvellous to meet her, I'm sure you'll all agree. You know what to do now. Read her! Interact with her! Follow her! 

And again, we want more Prosers for this feature, so if you like it, then suggest people, even volunteer yourselves. Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. Get busy.

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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @starryEyes
So, we’ve been briefed about it and have read some articles on it and can now say it is Friday. It's not fake news, people. It’s Friday. And we’d be doing Prose a very, very big disservice if we didn’t bring you the very, very good thing that is Friday Feature. People love it. Everybody says so. They like to read about the very, very nice people of Prose...

OK, enough of that crazy talk, let’s dive in to meet the entirely lovely @starryEyes

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
S: My name is Kim, but you can find me as starryEyes on Prose.

P: Where do you live?
S: I live in the northeast United States, out in the country on top of a hill with a fantastic view. My grandfather built the house in the 1970s and I absolutely love living here with my husband. Watching the birds, animals, wild weather, and changing seasons makes me happy.

We get our Internet by antenna from a local provider who beams it over from a tower that’s 4 miles away (no cable service out here). It’s better than satellite, except when wind, rain, and foliage conspire to eat data packets!

P: What is your occupation?
S: Hmmm… I’m probably most occupied with taking care of myself. So maybe my occupation is being alive? Or surviving. But I’d prefer “thriving.” That can be my occupation: thriving.

I went to school for electrical engineering and worked for five years designing and testing radar electronics. I absolutely loved it. But chronic Lyme disease made that impossible. I’m principally afflicted by profound fatigue and brain fog, but generally have a few good hours a day.

Right now I am content. There is so much more I’d like to do in life, but I’m pleased that I’m not getting any worse right now and have a sort of rhythm of productivity, fulfillment, and rest.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
S: Growing up, I wrote for school. I enjoyed all my writing assignments but rarely wrote of my own initiative. Late in high school and college, I kept a “prayer” journal that helped me untangle my thoughts and feelings while writing to God.

As I progressed in my engineering studies and career, I wrote a lot of technical documents. It turns out I really enjoy writing lab reports, test procedures, and documenting my designs. And who doesn’t love a good table or expressive graph? *happy sigh*

The first poem I ever wrote of my own free will flowed from my illness. My choppy, foggy, scattered, and desperate thoughts needed adequate expression. I now write poetry like it’s a puzzle to be solved - conveying meaning and depth by sound & structure & few words – an artistic efficiency. It must be the engineer in me.

I started writing short stories a year ago for fun. I really haven’t written many because I’m a slow writer and I don’t often feel well. But it makes me feel human and “normal” to compose something that I’m proud of. I attend a writing group at the library and find it immensely helpful and encouraging.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
S: I’ve always been a voracious reader of fiction. It makes me happy, stirs my imagination, fills me with stories, and teaches me about life. I love gleaning bits of wisdom from book characters and pondering their thoughts and actions. It’s an easy, gentle way to learn.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

I don’t have specific posting plans, but I often respond to writing challenges. Apparently I like to write from the perspective of non-humans such as an animal, plant, or park bench, so you may see more of that. I might sometimes write about my illness or my faith in Jesus, because both deeply define who I am. My loftiest dream is to write a historical choose-your-own-adventure book for kids.

P: What do you love about Prose?
S: Challenges, challenges, challenges! I’m way more motivated when someone challenges me than when I make up my own goals. That’s probably a character flaw. But I’m getting lots of practice and inspiration from the Prose community challenges and having fun! I also like the opportunity to share what I write and interact with other writers.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
S: There are oodles of good books, so how could I choose? But limited to one, I’d have to say the Bible. I believe that how we respond to Jesus is the single most important decision in this life. To make an informed choice, we have to read his words.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
S: If so, they are extremely unsung because I can’t think of who they might be! My parents and teachers were obvious influences, but no one person or event stands out in my mind.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
S: Contemplative. Sincere. Empathetic.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
S: “In Christ alone my hope is found. He is my light, my strength, my song… And as He stands in victory, sin’s curse has lost its grip on me! For I am His, and He is mine, bought with the precious blood of Christ.”

And the entire rest of the lyrics to “In Christ Alone” written by Stuart Townsend & Keith Getty

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
S: I like pop / rock / metal. My favorite artists are Britt Nicole, Fireflight (similar to Evanescence), and Tourniquet (similar to Metallica). I also really like a cappella and folk music. I can do anything to music except read and write. For those, silence is more conducive to concentration.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
S: “You know, books. B-O-O-K-S. Like writing. On paper. That you read. There must be some. This isn’t possible. Where did you go to school? Where’s the library?” After asking the same questions twenty times but getting the same answer, I think I’d become unresponsive and curl up, rocking back and forth.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
S: Curled up in a recliner with a blanket and a cat. Preferably my own recliner and my own cat. Any blanket will do.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
S: Nothing left to tell!

Thanks so much to Kim, it was marvellous to meet her, I'm sure you'll all agree. You know what to do now. Read her! Interact with her! Follow her! 

And again, we want more Prosers for this feature, so if you like it, then suggest people, even volunteer yourselves. Prose wants you to feature in future Friday Features. Get busy.
#nonfiction  #news  #opinion  #FF  #FridayFeature 
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Prose Challenge of the Week #58

Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-eight of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been rewriting the creation story, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who is the deserving winner and the recipient of $100, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #58: You are a victim of injustice, write a story about it. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $150. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Yes! This one is for a longer duration and for more $, so get yourself writing, now!

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-seven.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “creation story” challenge is @madbeyond with their piece, Out of the Blue

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.

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Juice
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Written by Prose in portal Prose
Prose Challenge of the Week #58
Good Afternoon, Prosers,

We hope this challenge announcement finds you well and writing!

It’s week fifty-eight of the Prose Challenge of the Week.

For the last week, you guys have been rewriting the creation story, and you all gave exactly what we wanted. Before we check out who is the deserving winner and the recipient of $100, let’s take a look at this week’s prompt:

Challenge of the Week #58: You are a victim of injustice, write a story about it. The most masterfully written piece, as voted and determined by the Prose team, will be crowned winner and receive $150. Quality beats quantity, always, but numbers make things easier for our judges, so share, share, share with friends, family, and connections. #ProseChallenge #getlit #itslit

Yes! This one is for a longer duration and for more $, so get yourself writing, now!

Now, back to the winner of week fifty-seven.

We have read all of your entries, and have come to a decision. The winner of the “creation story” challenge is @madbeyond with their piece, Out of the Blue

Congratulations! You have just won $100. We’ll be in touch with you shortly.

In the meantime, you have one week to get your write on!

Until next time, Prosers,

Prose.
#prosechallenge  #CotW  #Itslit  #getlit 
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