Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @AlexWestmore

It’s Friday, ergo, it’s Friday Feature time. This week we get to meet a lovely lady in beautiful Palm Springs who is going to rock your world. Be upstanding for @AlexWestmore

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

A: Linda Kay Silva is my real name. My pen name is Alex Westmore

P: Where do you live?

A: I live in sunny and often hot Palm Springs, but I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.

P: What is your occupation?

A: I am a Professor of Literature and history. I teach American, World, and British Lit. Sci-fi Fantasy, Women's Lit, and Creative Writing. I also teach American and World History

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

A: I have always written. Then a friend said, "Submit something." I did and was rejected multiple times before finally getting my first book published. It has evolved in so many ways. I am a much better writer now. I writer tighter prose and with 6 series, I have learned how to plant seeds and tie off loose ends.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

A: Reading is such a great thing. Reading keeps me sharper.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

A: I just published my first romance. In future posts, I'll be adding snippets from my other series...I'll be adding challenges...I think this is a great place for writers and readers to come together.

P: What do you love about Prose?

A: I love that it's about writing...not selling. Not a constant me me me or I I I. I have read some really well written pieces, and that's been fun. I believe we are all looking for community or a place to belong in these trying times.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

A: Mine. No lol. Just kidding. I think everyone should read To Kill a Mockingbird.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

A: Rita Mae Brown. I read everything she wrote...then decided I should try. Funny story. A few years ago, we met at a conference, and now we are good friends. That's one of the highlights of my life. She is brilliant, and the best storyteller I have ever listened to.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

A: Fearless, Funny, Fighter

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

A: The question isn't who's going to let me, it's who's going to stop me? Ayn Rand.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

A: I'm a classic writer, baby! And no, I do not listen to music when writing. I find it alters my mood which may or may not be appropriate to the scene I am writing.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

A: Books were WONDERFUL. They were like hot chocolate in your hands as you look out over the snow. They were like the fur of a rabbit or the sound of a waterfall. Books were diamonds; some shone, others had inclusions, but all added to our lives. Books had a distinctive odor, a familiar feel. They were, like each being on earth, special in their own right.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

A: I have written a number of novels poolside on a cruise ship. Yeah, I have a rough life, but someone has to do it, so I pick me. To be writing as you cruise trough the Panama Canal? Sublime. To be writing a book set in Egypt when you pull into the port in Alexandria? Yeah. Pretty fucking awesome.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

A: I write long hand with a fountain pen because I can write anywhere. There is also evidence that the kinesthetic act of writing does something different to our brains. 

Keyboarding is a very sterile activity, but the fluidity of writing opens many other pathways. I love it, and I have some awesome pens!

Thanks so much to Alex. Make sure you follow, like, love, and do the Prose thang! If you have sent your answers back and have yet to feature, fear not. There are a number lined up for future delectation. If you want to be involved, get in touch with an email and we’ll get the questions off to you.

28
16
10
Juice
380 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @AlexWestmore
It’s Friday, ergo, it’s Friday Feature time. This week we get to meet a lovely lady in beautiful Palm Springs who is going to rock your world. Be upstanding for @AlexWestmore

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
A: Linda Kay Silva is my real name. My pen name is Alex Westmore

P: Where do you live?
A: I live in sunny and often hot Palm Springs, but I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.

P: What is your occupation?
A: I am a Professor of Literature and history. I teach American, World, and British Lit. Sci-fi Fantasy, Women's Lit, and Creative Writing. I also teach American and World History

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
A: I have always written. Then a friend said, "Submit something." I did and was rejected multiple times before finally getting my first book published. It has evolved in so many ways. I am a much better writer now. I writer tighter prose and with 6 series, I have learned how to plant seeds and tie off loose ends.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
A: Reading is such a great thing. Reading keeps me sharper.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
A: I just published my first romance. In future posts, I'll be adding snippets from my other series...I'll be adding challenges...I think this is a great place for writers and readers to come together.

P: What do you love about Prose?
A: I love that it's about writing...not selling. Not a constant me me me or I I I. I have read some really well written pieces, and that's been fun. I believe we are all looking for community or a place to belong in these trying times.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
A: Mine. No lol. Just kidding. I think everyone should read To Kill a Mockingbird.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
A: Rita Mae Brown. I read everything she wrote...then decided I should try. Funny story. A few years ago, we met at a conference, and now we are good friends. That's one of the highlights of my life. She is brilliant, and the best storyteller I have ever listened to.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
A: Fearless, Funny, Fighter

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
A: The question isn't who's going to let me, it's who's going to stop me? Ayn Rand.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
A: I'm a classic writer, baby! And no, I do not listen to music when writing. I find it alters my mood which may or may not be appropriate to the scene I am writing.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
A: Books were WONDERFUL. They were like hot chocolate in your hands as you look out over the snow. They were like the fur of a rabbit or the sound of a waterfall. Books were diamonds; some shone, others had inclusions, but all added to our lives. Books had a distinctive odor, a familiar feel. They were, like each being on earth, special in their own right.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
A: I have written a number of novels poolside on a cruise ship. Yeah, I have a rough life, but someone has to do it, so I pick me. To be writing as you cruise trough the Panama Canal? Sublime. To be writing a book set in Egypt when you pull into the port in Alexandria? Yeah. Pretty fucking awesome.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
A: I write long hand with a fountain pen because I can write anywhere. There is also evidence that the kinesthetic act of writing does something different to our brains. 

Keyboarding is a very sterile activity, but the fluidity of writing opens many other pathways. I love it, and I have some awesome pens!

Thanks so much to Alex. Make sure you follow, like, love, and do the Prose thang! If you have sent your answers back and have yet to feature, fear not. There are a number lined up for future delectation. If you want to be involved, get in touch with an email and we’ll get the questions off to you.
#prose  #FF  #prosers  #FridayFeature 
28
16
10
Juice
380 reads
Load 10 Comments
Login to post comments.
Advertisement  (turn off)
Donate coins to TheTallOne.
Juice
Cancel
Written by TheTallOne in portal Feedback

Just some thoughts for Prose and Prosers.

So, I apologize in advance to what may be a long winded and needless run of reasoning that could easily be said in a few words. This is me, it is how I get my thoughts out, I feel I need to have a stout and sturdy foundation in order to build my opinion up and properly explain myself (I blame my dad).

 Keep in mind what follows is just my opinion. 

Apparently I missed a fairly interesting post by one of the Posers who also helps run the site. It appears to have been removed. I found out about it from Broken_Toe and he and I discussed it at length. Here are some things to think on.

You, my fellow Proser, have written something, be it for just your wall, mayhap a portal, or even a contest. You have spent time, poured your heart into, reread and edited, trim some fat or added meat. Then you may have had another read it for editing and suggestions. A deadline looms for the contest and yet you persevere and so, after hours or maybe even days you post your work and present your best—you get readers, but only 1% of those readers like it. You factor in taste and the genre bridge, but you still feel you should be seeing more likes or reposts. Is it ego? Are your fellow Prosers seeing that little heart and think it means love, and they say, “Well I like it, but I don’t love it.” Even though we all know it means “like” despite the heart symbol universally represents love. That could be why Facebook uses thumbs up… So, maybe they still think love deep down and hesitate. Now, imagine this has happen ten times or more. What do you feel? Rejection? Frustration? Do your posts taper off?

We could consider our “wages” for the works we have wrought the likes, reposts, comments, and followers. If we don’t received wages we may consider our works worthless.

If there seems to be no return for your effort, you think about giving up.

Granted, we should be investing our “wages” back into Prose with likes, reposts, comments, and following of other Prosers. Side note, I will be the first to admit I am not the best at this. I try, I will try harder. I need too anyway, my goal is to be a Partner.

So, some truths.

Writing is hard. It is work. We may write because we love to, but this DOES NOT negate the fact that it is still work. We seek validation, we want our fellow writers to enjoy it and tell us we have done well. If you spend a lot of time writing, then it is a job. Jobs require compensation. I love my job. But some days I don’t want to go to work. Some days I even hate my job. Some days I feel I am not paid enough to deal with all the shit.

But I get paid, actual money.

The people running this site should be paid. Currently they are not. They started like most of us. Eager even, while trying build up the site, thus making it a haven for fellow writers. We had many posts from them not too long ago, Motivation Mondays, Two for Tuesdays, Throwback Thursdays, Five for Fridays. There were the occasional interviews with authors or actors on top of Friday Feature, all to help, encourage, and build us up, the Prosers. I don’t remember if there was anything on Wednesday, but screw Wednesday.

Where are those now?

Money no doubt is running out. They are not being paid for their hard work and so they are not putting in the extra effort beyond keeping Prose up and running, along with coming up with fun and interesting sponsored challenges. I don’t blame them, I understand, I accept this. I would do the same.

For all I know they are paying the $100 winnings out of their pocket.

Running The Prose website is like an iceberg. Most of us only see the tip, not realizing over ¾ of the size is unseen below the water. Website and app bugs, contests, emails and instant messages to respond to, and even, I am sadly sure, trolls and out right needless bitching about other Prosers.

Do you like Facebook? Like those ads? Like how after shopping on Amazon you see ads for the stuff you looked at popping up on the Book of Faces?

I don’t.

Do you know how much Facebook makes off your information? They make about $6 per person per month to sell your information to AD companies. That is it. They are only making about $60 a year off of you. Is it worth the invasion into your privacy?

Think about this. $100 weekly challenge, 52 weeks, $5200 paid out a year.

We now have to pay 50 cents to enter said $100 contest, meaning Prose needs 200 entries per contest just to break even on each challenge. The last two paid challenges had only about 50-60 entries. They are still losing money.

What can be done? The short and easiest answer is-- ADS.

BOOO!

That will suck, so how can we fix this without wallowing in that quagmire?

Humble suggestion-- paid memberships. Everyone, whether paid member or not will still get access to all Prose has to offer.

But with membership comes perks.

50 cents per sponsored challenge equals $2 a month at $24 a year. So let’s start there. A $24 paid membership allows free entry into paid to enter weekly challenges. That could be the only perk or there could be more. But if that was it, Prose would only need 240 paid memberships to cover the cost of a year’s weekly challenges.

More than 240 paid memberships, that extra money is cheddar. It could pay the actual Prosers who run the site. Maybe get extra challenges with bigger purses.

It would work like a gym membership; they make money knowing not everyone is going to use the membership to the fullest. So not every paid member will use their credit to enter every Prose sponsored contest and they would still draw money from non-paid members entering weekly contest at 50 cents.

I say again, the paid membership would be an option, NOT a requirement.

But imagine, $24 paid membership-- 1000 paid Members means $24,000 to run the website and improve the overall Prose experience. What about 2000 paid members? What could be done with that to help us all?

Perks?

I said already, allowed to enter Prose sponsored challenges for free. What should the other perks be? Well besides supporting a site we all love, it could help it stay ad free, and pay for the running of the site. I don’t know if there should be other perks; as they may be considered an advantage non-paid membership Prosers don’t have access too.

What do you all think? Should there be other perks?

I also think there should be more time for deciding the winner of the $100 contests. You would still have a week to enter, but why couldn’t it be announced the following week, or even two weeks later? This gives more time to vet each entry and judge its merit. I am not saying this is not done now, but I am certain there is a bit of haste to it. A bigger span of time would ease the pressure.

And the judging can’t be easy. I will admit I am not completely sure as to how this goes down currently.

But, what if a paid Member, who also is a Partner, is thrown into the judging pool? Judges could num up to a dozen, and rotate out, like Jury duty. Again, just to ease the pressure.

These are just ideas and my opinion. They mean nothing really to anyone but me.

I will also admit, I will be cringing when I hit the post button. Fearing to see what you all think and how you will react.

30
16
23
Juice
197 reads
Donate coins to TheTallOne.
Juice
Cancel
Written by TheTallOne in portal Feedback
Just some thoughts for Prose and Prosers.
So, I apologize in advance to what may be a long winded and needless run of reasoning that could easily be said in a few words. This is me, it is how I get my thoughts out, I feel I need to have a stout and sturdy foundation in order to build my opinion up and properly explain myself (I blame my dad).

 Keep in mind what follows is just my opinion. 

Apparently I missed a fairly interesting post by one of the Posers who also helps run the site. It appears to have been removed. I found out about it from Broken_Toe and he and I discussed it at length. Here are some things to think on.

You, my fellow Proser, have written something, be it for just your wall, mayhap a portal, or even a contest. You have spent time, poured your heart into, reread and edited, trim some fat or added meat. Then you may have had another read it for editing and suggestions. A deadline looms for the contest and yet you persevere and so, after hours or maybe even days you post your work and present your best—you get readers, but only 1% of those readers like it. You factor in taste and the genre bridge, but you still feel you should be seeing more likes or reposts. Is it ego? Are your fellow Prosers seeing that little heart and think it means love, and they say, “Well I like it, but I don’t love it.” Even though we all know it means “like” despite the heart symbol universally represents love. That could be why Facebook uses thumbs up… So, maybe they still think love deep down and hesitate. Now, imagine this has happen ten times or more. What do you feel? Rejection? Frustration? Do your posts taper off?

We could consider our “wages” for the works we have wrought the likes, reposts, comments, and followers. If we don’t received wages we may consider our works worthless.

If there seems to be no return for your effort, you think about giving up.

Granted, we should be investing our “wages” back into Prose with likes, reposts, comments, and following of other Prosers. Side note, I will be the first to admit I am not the best at this. I try, I will try harder. I need too anyway, my goal is to be a Partner.

So, some truths.

Writing is hard. It is work. We may write because we love to, but this DOES NOT negate the fact that it is still work. We seek validation, we want our fellow writers to enjoy it and tell us we have done well. If you spend a lot of time writing, then it is a job. Jobs require compensation. I love my job. But some days I don’t want to go to work. Some days I even hate my job. Some days I feel I am not paid enough to deal with all the shit.

But I get paid, actual money.

The people running this site should be paid. Currently they are not. They started like most of us. Eager even, while trying build up the site, thus making it a haven for fellow writers. We had many posts from them not too long ago, Motivation Mondays, Two for Tuesdays, Throwback Thursdays, Five for Fridays. There were the occasional interviews with authors or actors on top of Friday Feature, all to help, encourage, and build us up, the Prosers. I don’t remember if there was anything on Wednesday, but screw Wednesday.

Where are those now?

Money no doubt is running out. They are not being paid for their hard work and so they are not putting in the extra effort beyond keeping Prose up and running, along with coming up with fun and interesting sponsored challenges. I don’t blame them, I understand, I accept this. I would do the same.

For all I know they are paying the $100 winnings out of their pocket.

Running The Prose website is like an iceberg. Most of us only see the tip, not realizing over ¾ of the size is unseen below the water. Website and app bugs, contests, emails and instant messages to respond to, and even, I am sadly sure, trolls and out right needless bitching about other Prosers.

Do you like Facebook? Like those ads? Like how after shopping on Amazon you see ads for the stuff you looked at popping up on the Book of Faces?

I don’t.

Do you know how much Facebook makes off your information? They make about $6 per person per month to sell your information to AD companies. That is it. They are only making about $60 a year off of you. Is it worth the invasion into your privacy?

Think about this. $100 weekly challenge, 52 weeks, $5200 paid out a year.

We now have to pay 50 cents to enter said $100 contest, meaning Prose needs 200 entries per contest just to break even on each challenge. The last two paid challenges had only about 50-60 entries. They are still losing money.

What can be done? The short and easiest answer is-- ADS.

BOOO!

That will suck, so how can we fix this without wallowing in that quagmire?

Humble suggestion-- paid memberships. Everyone, whether paid member or not will still get access to all Prose has to offer.

But with membership comes perks.

50 cents per sponsored challenge equals $2 a month at $24 a year. So let’s start there. A $24 paid membership allows free entry into paid to enter weekly challenges. That could be the only perk or there could be more. But if that was it, Prose would only need 240 paid memberships to cover the cost of a year’s weekly challenges.

More than 240 paid memberships, that extra money is cheddar. It could pay the actual Prosers who run the site. Maybe get extra challenges with bigger purses.

It would work like a gym membership; they make money knowing not everyone is going to use the membership to the fullest. So not every paid member will use their credit to enter every Prose sponsored contest and they would still draw money from non-paid members entering weekly contest at 50 cents.

I say again, the paid membership would be an option, NOT a requirement.

But imagine, $24 paid membership-- 1000 paid Members means $24,000 to run the website and improve the overall Prose experience. What about 2000 paid members? What could be done with that to help us all?

Perks?

I said already, allowed to enter Prose sponsored challenges for free. What should the other perks be? Well besides supporting a site we all love, it could help it stay ad free, and pay for the running of the site. I don’t know if there should be other perks; as they may be considered an advantage non-paid membership Prosers don’t have access too.

What do you all think? Should there be other perks?

I also think there should be more time for deciding the winner of the $100 contests. You would still have a week to enter, but why couldn’t it be announced the following week, or even two weeks later? This gives more time to vet each entry and judge its merit. I am not saying this is not done now, but I am certain there is a bit of haste to it. A bigger span of time would ease the pressure.

And the judging can’t be easy. I will admit I am not completely sure as to how this goes down currently.

But, what if a paid Member, who also is a Partner, is thrown into the judging pool? Judges could num up to a dozen, and rotate out, like Jury duty. Again, just to ease the pressure.

These are just ideas and my opinion. They mean nothing really to anyone but me.

I will also admit, I will be cringing when I hit the post button. Fearing to see what you all think and how you will react.
30
16
23
Juice
197 reads
Load 23 Comments
Login to post comments.
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @mrjdhyde

It’s only bloody Friday again. Naturally, as we all know, Fridays we get to greedily consume the tidbits and morsels of a Proser’s life. This week is another splendid one, as we find out about a Proser that many of us know and love, but want to know what lurks behind the mask. We’re heading to Montana; as we prepare to meet with @mrjhyde

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

J: My name is James, I go by mrjdhyde online.

P: Where do you live?

J: Helena Montana. Which as most people don’t know is where you go if you NEVER want to be discovered as a writer. Apparently there’s a literary black hole in the middle of town. I once saw it eat three poets, and a novelist. Sad really, but on the plus side, I consoled their widows.

P: What is your occupation?

J: I’m a writer. I make no money at it yet, and I support my writing with working at a grocery store and doing odd jobs. But I think that how we define ourselves if very important. So, I am a writer.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

J: I always wanted to be a writer, but never had the sack enough to take pen to paper. I would just make up stories in my head. Then I started sexting, full stories. I joined a fetish site that let you post stories, and that gave me enough confidence to branch out into other genres. Soon, that site wasn’t what I wanted anymore. I wanted to be a real thing writer. Not a popular one, but a good one.

For me, good trumps popular every time. So I study writing and how I can become better with each story, and poem. I’m still the guy who uses the word “grammarize” but at least now I know that I shouldn’t use it.

For me the written word is the ultimate art form, because it is carried in the head after use. Some one can still tell a story even if the book was burned, that story will live on. And stories can change the world, bring down kingdoms.

I often tell people that a king fears the song, not the sword. Only one man can wield a sword, but a song can sweep through the country like a fire. Thousands singing.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

J: It makes me a better person, as a child i didn’t have good strong role models so I found them in books. They helped me decide what kind of man that I would be. Whenever I read a book I put myself in the place of the characters and ask myself what I would do in their situations.

In my professional life there’s three books that have guided me. The Art of War, The Book of Five rings, and The Hagakure. In order these books teach how to be a General, a soldier, and samurai.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to?

J: Dear lord, I’m writing six books right now I think? And short stories galore. Future posts? probably some angry rambling, some ranting, frothing, a few poems, a short story or thirty. And then the day after tomorrow...

P: What do you love about Prose?

J: Brooding poetry chicks… What???

I mean, uh… The stories. And the challenges. Because there are so many great writers on site, I have to work harder trying to be a better writer to compete in the challenges.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

J: Anything with my name on the cover.

Barring that… Christopher Moore. Anything by him will make you laugh, which will make your day better. Which makes the world better, so read him. You want to make the world a better place don’t you?

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

J: S.E. Hinton, I read ‘The Outsiders’ in school and it changed my life. Suddenly I found out that there were people like me out there. That began my reading.

As for writing? Brooding poetry chicks… Blame them.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

J: I’m nobody special.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

J: No, but if you think of one please send it to me. I would like to know.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

J: I play a few instruments, so genre of music isn’t as important to me as how well that it’s done. And no, I need quiet to write because Squirrel.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

J: “Hi, God sent me. Bring me to the women.”

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

J: My big over stuffed leather chair. I love my chair, and it loves me.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media?

J: Mark Zuckerberg is the reason for Justin Bieber. Really, Mark created him to try to control the Girl Scout mafia. Unfortunately, Mark lost control of the poor, mad thing. And it ended up eating the real Zuckerberg. Now Facebook is controlled by the CIA, in hopes of getting the secret Keebler recipes.

Well thank you very much, James. How cool was that, and was he? You know what to do now – follow, like, comment, love; do all those things that make us what we are.

41
16
27
Juice
555 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @mrjdhyde
It’s only bloody Friday again. Naturally, as we all know, Fridays we get to greedily consume the tidbits and morsels of a Proser’s life. This week is another splendid one, as we find out about a Proser that many of us know and love, but want to know what lurks behind the mask. We’re heading to Montana; as we prepare to meet with @mrjhyde

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
J: My name is James, I go by mrjdhyde online.

P: Where do you live?
J: Helena Montana. Which as most people don’t know is where you go if you NEVER want to be discovered as a writer. Apparently there’s a literary black hole in the middle of town. I once saw it eat three poets, and a novelist. Sad really, but on the plus side, I consoled their widows.

P: What is your occupation?
J: I’m a writer. I make no money at it yet, and I support my writing with working at a grocery store and doing odd jobs. But I think that how we define ourselves if very important. So, I am a writer.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
J: I always wanted to be a writer, but never had the sack enough to take pen to paper. I would just make up stories in my head. Then I started sexting, full stories. I joined a fetish site that let you post stories, and that gave me enough confidence to branch out into other genres. Soon, that site wasn’t what I wanted anymore. I wanted to be a real thing writer. Not a popular one, but a good one.

For me, good trumps popular every time. So I study writing and how I can become better with each story, and poem. I’m still the guy who uses the word “grammarize” but at least now I know that I shouldn’t use it.

For me the written word is the ultimate art form, because it is carried in the head after use. Some one can still tell a story even if the book was burned, that story will live on. And stories can change the world, bring down kingdoms.

I often tell people that a king fears the song, not the sword. Only one man can wield a sword, but a song can sweep through the country like a fire. Thousands singing.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
J: It makes me a better person, as a child i didn’t have good strong role models so I found them in books. They helped me decide what kind of man that I would be. Whenever I read a book I put myself in the place of the characters and ask myself what I would do in their situations.

In my professional life there’s three books that have guided me. The Art of War, The Book of Five rings, and The Hagakure. In order these books teach how to be a General, a soldier, and samurai.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to?
J: Dear lord, I’m writing six books right now I think? And short stories galore. Future posts? probably some angry rambling, some ranting, frothing, a few poems, a short story or thirty. And then the day after tomorrow...

P: What do you love about Prose?
J: Brooding poetry chicks… What???

I mean, uh… The stories. And the challenges. Because there are so many great writers on site, I have to work harder trying to be a better writer to compete in the challenges.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
J: Anything with my name on the cover.

Barring that… Christopher Moore. Anything by him will make you laugh, which will make your day better. Which makes the world better, so read him. You want to make the world a better place don’t you?

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
J: S.E. Hinton, I read ‘The Outsiders’ in school and it changed my life. Suddenly I found out that there were people like me out there. That began my reading.

As for writing? Brooding poetry chicks… Blame them.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
J: I’m nobody special.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
J: No, but if you think of one please send it to me. I would like to know.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
J: I play a few instruments, so genre of music isn’t as important to me as how well that it’s done. And no, I need quiet to write because Squirrel.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
J: “Hi, God sent me. Bring me to the women.”

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
J: My big over stuffed leather chair. I love my chair, and it loves me.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media?
J: Mark Zuckerberg is the reason for Justin Bieber. Really, Mark created him to try to control the Girl Scout mafia. Unfortunately, Mark lost control of the poor, mad thing. And it ended up eating the real Zuckerberg. Now Facebook is controlled by the CIA, in hopes of getting the secret Keebler recipes.

Well thank you very much, James. How cool was that, and was he? You know what to do now – follow, like, comment, love; do all those things that make us what we are.

#nonfiction  #news  #opinion  #FF 
41
16
27
Juice
555 reads
Load 27 Comments
Login to post comments.
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @Bunny

Well blow me down, it’s already Friday - again! And that means the regular piece that you all enjoy, which is, of course, our Friday Feature. Each week we get to root through a Proser’s life, loves and linguistic leanings; and this week we have a smasher for you. Prosers, please be upstanding for @Bunny

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

B: My ‘given name’, bestowed upon me by one of my best friends Stacia, and the family Tattoo Artist, my aunt Isabelle, is 'Bunny' Villaire. For Prose I go as Bunny.

Legally my name is Josh Villaire, but that name don't mean squat to me anymore.

Bunny is my spirit name, and I can see myself going by it until I'm a funny old man.

I imagine myself living by the lake, and someone yells out "Hey, Bunny!", and my funny old ears perk up.

I'm in the process of legally changing it, but what's in a name?

P: Where do you live?

B: I live in Grand Rapids, Michigan, but I’m really into moving around (upward and outward!), and my bands gearing up for a nationwide tour, (if not international) coming up real soon(at the latest, next Christmas). My band Tail From the Crypt is an underground Darkwave English and French bilingual band. We have electronic elements, and I have had to learn many new instruments for our band lately, so we can be as minimal as possible. The musical learning has consumed a great amount of my free time, much to my pleasure. We just recently had a release party for both our first full length Cd and our vinyl Ep, and now have a most righteous obligation to get our wild brand of sound out to anyone in earshot. Please give us a listen at: 

https://tailfromthecrypt.bandcamp.com/album/tail-from-the-crypt

P: What is your occupation?

B: I’m a starving artist. I live to write poetry, and maka the music. When I was homeless years ago, all I had was poetry and my band, and the Muse never dared leave my side. It’s always been my go to.

Rock’n’roll has teased my soul, and I like it. I’m also a Yoga instructor, and I do a little of that on the side. Got my start in that by teaching women at a Recovery Center.

Yoga is so very important in helping me calm my soul in times of psychic assault. Psychic assault comes from everywhere with our modern ongoing encroachment of technology.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

B: I would say my writing really took off with my intial obsession with William S. Burroughs, and the beats in highschool.

Even before that I had a poem published in a compilation book at 13.

But then there was a magical copy of Leonard Cohen’s Best Of from the 60s to the 70s on Cd that mysteriously just appeared on my kitchen table for no other reason but to get my wheels spinning.

Beyond that, probably the most inspiring music that got my mind soaring, and my gums flapping was the all instrumental band Future Sound of London that I began singing to in my teens before I started any band. The lack of vocals was truly inspiring because I could insert myself between the lines.

I’ve sang and wrote for many various bands since 2001 to now, pretty much nonstop.

I’ve also attended poetry readings and performed performance art(shudder!) or what I like to call it ‘self sacrifice’.

"For similar reasons, Grand Rapids native Josh Villaire began incorporating elements of performance art into concerts with his now-defunct music ensemble, Coin. Today, Villaire is involved in Butoh and other projects he describes as “experimental theater,” but he shuns the label “performance artist.”

“I prefer ‘self-sacrifice.’” Villaire said. “That’s what it is.”

He continued: “You’re up there ripping your heart out in front of people. And if they don’t like it, maybe it’s because they’re looking into a dark side of their soul that they don’t like. That’s what I like about it.”

At first glance, Villaire’s take might seem a little self-indulgent (yet another reason some members of the general population might employ the word “crap” rather than working out an understanding of a performance art piece). But Villaire doesn’t see it that way. Posing a challenge to audience members, as he explained, is a way of gifting them with something to think about.

“It’s kind of like the stuff Andy Kauffman used to do,” Villaire said. “You never know if people are going to like it, and that’s so much better than people just clapping without even thinking about it.

“Maybe they’re angry when they go home, but at least they’re thinking about why they’re angry.”

---From Grand Rapids Magazine, 2004

Well for the past couple of years now I’ve been forcing myself to write at least one poem a day. I believe that this strictness to my routine has helped my writing grow immensely.

I have written a large body of songs for my various bands, always in the role of singer song-writer in all my projects. It’s only recently that I have just started to become a musician as well learning drum machine and keys, although one could say that the voice in itself is one of the most magnificent instruments. I’ve always been drawn to the rawer, content heavy writers like Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith, and Marianne Faithful.

At the same time, I cherish the ambiguous writers like William S. Burroughs, and Captain Beefheart. Rules are made to be broken when it comes to writing, and attempting various ways of producing literature.

I have self-published a zine of writing with a co-editor friend named Kevin Hovey. 

Together we focused on writing inspired by the nostalgic aura of trains, and train tracks. This venture, which landed us both in jail for breaking and entering on a train yard, was entitled ‘Track Marks’, and I’m still quite fond of it and the idea. It was a collection of short stories, and poems, and art. The newest zine that I’m now obsessed with completing is called ‘The Hairy Exchange’, and this newest project will be writing mostly focused on hard to find records(vinyl) and different avenues of acquiring vinyl, as well as incredibly strange music, and the history of the people behind it. There will also be stories of the cheapest record various collectors have ever bought, mainly the ones that are personal favorites in their collection.

The zine will also be rife with conspiracy stories, and perhaps some underground culture news.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

B: I remember a teacher once telling me that you should read more then you write, which I would agree with. Every time I read something I immediately find myself more inspired to write, and more inspired to speak my mind. Writing isn’t like most television. It doesn’t intimidate, it inspires, as long as you give it a chance. Although television nowadays has taken the form of Art House movies in the 90s. Reading literature, especially in physical book form, is a very engaging activity, because it allows you to form your own images.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

B: I’m currently writing a short story about a desert grifter right now who has a scam going with some prostitutes somewhere in California, and I feel my writing pushing towards a kind of Kafkaesque dark comedy region. Perhaps it’s in my blood, but I love the dark, and I’m feeling progressively driven towards that kind of formula of revelling in the unexpected, and championing the humor of the mundane and how it erupts into beautiful chaos. There's nothing more interesting to me than investigating the nuances of chaos.

P: What do you love about Prose?

B: I love the opportunity to meet so many of my ilk and breed. The writer in general is quite an interesting animal, and any chance I can get to break bread, and share thoughts with kindred souls is my cup of Whiskey.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

B: Amerika by Franz Kafka.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

B: My uncle Lou Villaire had a compilation book of poetry published when I was a preteen. I always looked to him as a great influence with his book ‘Worldings’, and many of his friends and connections from when he was in the poetry group the Twilight Tribe.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

B: Challenging, cryptic, and opaque.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

B: “Don't bend; don't water it down; don't try to make it logical; don't edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly”

--Franz Kafka

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

B: I favor many musical genres. I’m an avid record junkie, addicted to many various styles of music, but the one style of music I’ve perhaps been most obsessed with lately is Italian Disco. Italian Disco is similar to Space Disco, but worlds away from American Disco. Lately I’ve been really in Funk also, and been trying hungrily to track down all the best Chaka Khan records.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

B: I think that the best thing to do in that situation would be to write a book. Maybe one with dirty pictures in it so's you can get their attention if their all deteriorated in the mental department. Whatever can get them reading again, and realizing it's vital importance in the scheme of things.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

B: I love to write under bridges, and underpasses. I love finding magical environments that resonant with the rebel, and the loner. The process of finding a secret place where you can feel comfortable writing can be quite rewarding as well. From experience, I've found that the best way to generate new writing material is by taking a long walk. This is where a tape recorder to record your thoughts comes in handy.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

B: I'd like to reiterate that my vinyl record, and my full length CD I just released with my band Tail From the Crypt is some of the best stuff (writing and otherwise) I've ever been a part of.

Both are available for listening and purchase at: 

https://tailfromthecrypt.bandcamp.com/album/tail-from-the-crypt

And that’s how you do a Friday Feature. Do your Prose thang and like, follow, love and interact with Bunny – and buy his record (do you ship to the UK? – PaulDChambers). Thanks for your answers, Bunny! You really gave in that.

If you are a regular user of Prose and want to feature, or you know someone that does (or should), then do please get in touch with us at info@theprose.com

22
12
27
Juice
469 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @Bunny
Well blow me down, it’s already Friday - again! And that means the regular piece that you all enjoy, which is, of course, our Friday Feature. Each week we get to root through a Proser’s life, loves and linguistic leanings; and this week we have a smasher for you. Prosers, please be upstanding for @Bunny

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
B: My ‘given name’, bestowed upon me by one of my best friends Stacia, and the family Tattoo Artist, my aunt Isabelle, is 'Bunny' Villaire. For Prose I go as Bunny.

Legally my name is Josh Villaire, but that name don't mean squat to me anymore.

Bunny is my spirit name, and I can see myself going by it until I'm a funny old man.

I imagine myself living by the lake, and someone yells out "Hey, Bunny!", and my funny old ears perk up.

I'm in the process of legally changing it, but what's in a name?

P: Where do you live?
B: I live in Grand Rapids, Michigan, but I’m really into moving around (upward and outward!), and my bands gearing up for a nationwide tour, (if not international) coming up real soon(at the latest, next Christmas). My band Tail From the Crypt is an underground Darkwave English and French bilingual band. We have electronic elements, and I have had to learn many new instruments for our band lately, so we can be as minimal as possible. The musical learning has consumed a great amount of my free time, much to my pleasure. We just recently had a release party for both our first full length Cd and our vinyl Ep, and now have a most righteous obligation to get our wild brand of sound out to anyone in earshot. Please give us a listen at: 

https://tailfromthecrypt.bandcamp.com/album/tail-from-the-crypt

P: What is your occupation?
B: I’m a starving artist. I live to write poetry, and maka the music. When I was homeless years ago, all I had was poetry and my band, and the Muse never dared leave my side. It’s always been my go to.

Rock’n’roll has teased my soul, and I like it. I’m also a Yoga instructor, and I do a little of that on the side. Got my start in that by teaching women at a Recovery Center.

Yoga is so very important in helping me calm my soul in times of psychic assault. Psychic assault comes from everywhere with our modern ongoing encroachment of technology.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
B: I would say my writing really took off with my intial obsession with William S. Burroughs, and the beats in highschool.

Even before that I had a poem published in a compilation book at 13.

But then there was a magical copy of Leonard Cohen’s Best Of from the 60s to the 70s on Cd that mysteriously just appeared on my kitchen table for no other reason but to get my wheels spinning.

Beyond that, probably the most inspiring music that got my mind soaring, and my gums flapping was the all instrumental band Future Sound of London that I began singing to in my teens before I started any band. The lack of vocals was truly inspiring because I could insert myself between the lines.

I’ve sang and wrote for many various bands since 2001 to now, pretty much nonstop.
I’ve also attended poetry readings and performed performance art(shudder!) or what I like to call it ‘self sacrifice’.

"For similar reasons, Grand Rapids native Josh Villaire began incorporating elements of performance art into concerts with his now-defunct music ensemble, Coin. Today, Villaire is involved in Butoh and other projects he describes as “experimental theater,” but he shuns the label “performance artist.”

“I prefer ‘self-sacrifice.’” Villaire said. “That’s what it is.”

He continued: “You’re up there ripping your heart out in front of people. And if they don’t like it, maybe it’s because they’re looking into a dark side of their soul that they don’t like. That’s what I like about it.”

At first glance, Villaire’s take might seem a little self-indulgent (yet another reason some members of the general population might employ the word “crap” rather than working out an understanding of a performance art piece). But Villaire doesn’t see it that way. Posing a challenge to audience members, as he explained, is a way of gifting them with something to think about.

“It’s kind of like the stuff Andy Kauffman used to do,” Villaire said. “You never know if people are going to like it, and that’s so much better than people just clapping without even thinking about it.

“Maybe they’re angry when they go home, but at least they’re thinking about why they’re angry.”
---From Grand Rapids Magazine, 2004

Well for the past couple of years now I’ve been forcing myself to write at least one poem a day. I believe that this strictness to my routine has helped my writing grow immensely.
I have written a large body of songs for my various bands, always in the role of singer song-writer in all my projects. It’s only recently that I have just started to become a musician as well learning drum machine and keys, although one could say that the voice in itself is one of the most magnificent instruments. I’ve always been drawn to the rawer, content heavy writers like Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith, and Marianne Faithful.

At the same time, I cherish the ambiguous writers like William S. Burroughs, and Captain Beefheart. Rules are made to be broken when it comes to writing, and attempting various ways of producing literature.

I have self-published a zine of writing with a co-editor friend named Kevin Hovey. 

Together we focused on writing inspired by the nostalgic aura of trains, and train tracks. This venture, which landed us both in jail for breaking and entering on a train yard, was entitled ‘Track Marks’, and I’m still quite fond of it and the idea. It was a collection of short stories, and poems, and art. The newest zine that I’m now obsessed with completing is called ‘The Hairy Exchange’, and this newest project will be writing mostly focused on hard to find records(vinyl) and different avenues of acquiring vinyl, as well as incredibly strange music, and the history of the people behind it. There will also be stories of the cheapest record various collectors have ever bought, mainly the ones that are personal favorites in their collection.

The zine will also be rife with conspiracy stories, and perhaps some underground culture news.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
B: I remember a teacher once telling me that you should read more then you write, which I would agree with. Every time I read something I immediately find myself more inspired to write, and more inspired to speak my mind. Writing isn’t like most television. It doesn’t intimidate, it inspires, as long as you give it a chance. Although television nowadays has taken the form of Art House movies in the 90s. Reading literature, especially in physical book form, is a very engaging activity, because it allows you to form your own images.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
B: I’m currently writing a short story about a desert grifter right now who has a scam going with some prostitutes somewhere in California, and I feel my writing pushing towards a kind of Kafkaesque dark comedy region. Perhaps it’s in my blood, but I love the dark, and I’m feeling progressively driven towards that kind of formula of revelling in the unexpected, and championing the humor of the mundane and how it erupts into beautiful chaos. There's nothing more interesting to me than investigating the nuances of chaos.

P: What do you love about Prose?
B: I love the opportunity to meet so many of my ilk and breed. The writer in general is quite an interesting animal, and any chance I can get to break bread, and share thoughts with kindred souls is my cup of Whiskey.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
B: Amerika by Franz Kafka.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
B: My uncle Lou Villaire had a compilation book of poetry published when I was a preteen. I always looked to him as a great influence with his book ‘Worldings’, and many of his friends and connections from when he was in the poetry group the Twilight Tribe.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
B: Challenging, cryptic, and opaque.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
B: “Don't bend; don't water it down; don't try to make it logical; don't edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly”
--Franz Kafka

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
B: I favor many musical genres. I’m an avid record junkie, addicted to many various styles of music, but the one style of music I’ve perhaps been most obsessed with lately is Italian Disco. Italian Disco is similar to Space Disco, but worlds away from American Disco. Lately I’ve been really in Funk also, and been trying hungrily to track down all the best Chaka Khan records.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
B: I think that the best thing to do in that situation would be to write a book. Maybe one with dirty pictures in it so's you can get their attention if their all deteriorated in the mental department. Whatever can get them reading again, and realizing it's vital importance in the scheme of things.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
B: I love to write under bridges, and underpasses. I love finding magical environments that resonant with the rebel, and the loner. The process of finding a secret place where you can feel comfortable writing can be quite rewarding as well. From experience, I've found that the best way to generate new writing material is by taking a long walk. This is where a tape recorder to record your thoughts comes in handy.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
B: I'd like to reiterate that my vinyl record, and my full length CD I just released with my band Tail From the Crypt is some of the best stuff (writing and otherwise) I've ever been a part of.

Both are available for listening and purchase at: 

https://tailfromthecrypt.bandcamp.com/album/tail-from-the-crypt

And that’s how you do a Friday Feature. Do your Prose thang and like, follow, love and interact with Bunny – and buy his record (do you ship to the UK? – PaulDChambers). Thanks for your answers, Bunny! You really gave in that.

If you are a regular user of Prose and want to feature, or you know someone that does (or should), then do please get in touch with us at info@theprose.com

#nonfiction  #adventure  #news  #FF  #FridayFeature 
22
12
27
Juice
469 reads
Load 27 Comments
Login to post comments.
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @JamesMByers

It’s Friday. It’s a good Friday. And it’s actually Good Friday! Of course, every Friday we hungrily delve into a Proser's life in our Friday Feature. This week is no exception, yet is exceptional, as we are finding out all about a Proser that many of us know and love, but want to know more about. He actually answered our questions a while ago, but silly me (Paul), didn't post it for some reason! Please be upstanding for JamesMByers!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

J: Greetings Prose. I'm James Matthew Byers. You guys know me as @JamesMByers.

P: Where do you live?

J: I reside in Wellington, AL. What's special about that? Wellington, New Zealand happens to be where Peter Jackson filmed much of The Lord of the Rings films. I'd like to think of my home as a displaced component of the Shire. After all, our dog is named Arwen … My wife and two of my four children live with me in our above ground “Hobbit hole.”

P: What is your occupation?

J: By day, I'm a mild mannered middle school teacher. But when the sun sets, the mask appears. Then I am James Matthew Byers, writer, poet, and illustrator. Outside of my day job, I'm on the crew at Stitched Smile Publications, LLC as their resident illustrator.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

J: Writing has been an essential element for most of my life. I've been crafting stories and illustrating them since, believe it or not, age three. In sixth grade I had the pleasure of being introduced to poetry via Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken.” It altered the course of my life forever. I began writing songs and poems. I wrote novellas. I illustrated everything. Through education and practice, I have evolved into a focused poet who utilizes rhyming mechanisms to primarily express what's in my soul. I've grown leaps and bounds with the use of meter. I wrote my first rhyming tale my senior year in high school. We had to construct a story similar to Chaucer’s style in “The Canterbury Tales.” I fell in love with combing story telling and rhyming. The rest, as they say, is history.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

J: Reading is why I'm here. I've been an avid reader my whole life. I taught middle school English and reading for ten years. Staying in books increases your vocabulary. It also teaches how plot devices are applied and how characters grow and change in their development. I've read nearly every DragonLance novel out there. Lewis and Tolkien are influences. There are so many! I'm an advocate for people to visit the classics, like “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” “Dracula,” “A Princess of Mars,” and so many other wonderful maps we all need to follow. I read to relax, and professionally, I read to stay relevant. As a writer, you must possess “withitness.”

P: Can you describe your current and future literary ventures?

J: Currently I'm working on several projects for Stitched Smile Publications. I've got a rhyming story called “The Secrets That We Keep” in their latest anthology. It's called Unleashed: Monsters Vs. Zombies. I've also got anther mini epic called “Killer Jelly Beans from Outer Space” in a collection of Easter themed horror tales called Collected Easter Horror Shorts. It's something that a wonderful fellow named Kevin J. Kennedy put together. And there will be sequels to my current release, Beowulf: The Midgard Epic. In May, my poem, “The Dinner Fly,” will be in Weirdbook Magazine issue #35. I'm also going to be in an upcoming issue of Grievous Angel. (http://www.urbanfantasist.com/grievous-angel) The poem is titled “Conundrum of the Irish Sea.” As far as posts here at Prose, the skies the limit. I'll be crafting some nifty story poems, entering challenges, and offering a few surprises.

P: What do you love about Prose?

J: Prose has risen to the top of my favorite social media outlets. This is where I've found my tribe. I enjoy encouraging other writers and poets. I enjoy sharing my work with a community who get it; get me. I'm plugging it like crazy on all my social media venues. I wake up excited every day to see new faces and old friends publish their works. You can't get that kind of excitement just any where. I'm still I awe that I've won three of the weekly challenges. What do I love about Prose? EVERYTHING!!!

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

J: There are so many great books! The classics would be an easy go to, but I'm going to plug a literary hero of mine. J. Robert Kings “Hellmaw: The Incubus Tweets” is my sacrificial lamb. It's out now from The Ed Greenwood Group. (Onder Librum) It's hip, relevant, and quite humorous. This generation would get it, and for reading to be relatable conquers many battles in the most simplistic of fashions. The protagonist/antagonist, Frank Demonkowski keeps you in stitches. I'd like everyone to laugh hardly as they go gently into that good night …

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

J: My senior English teacher, Marie Duncan, definitely played a critical role in who I am today. She's my friend on Facebook. Recently she celebrated her eightieth birthday. I'm so happy she's getting to see me break into this wonderful industry!

P: Describe yourself in three words!

J: Enthusiastic, poetic, unique

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

J: “To a young heart everything is fun.” – Charles Dickens

P: Favourite music to write and/or read to?

J: I'm into so many facets of music. If I'm reading or writing, I primarily stick with soundtrack scores. Conan the Barbarian is a fave. I also love The Last of the Mohicans. Anything John Williams will do. When I illustrate, I alternate between classical, symphonic metal, and Garbage. I've created many entries into the art world while thumping along to “Version 2.0.”

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

J:

Once upon a time we had to write our stories down.

Now you have no books that I have noticed in your town.

What's a book? I'm glad you asked- I'll fill you in right here.

Paper bound containing words, they filled the mind with cheer.

Some expressed a broken heart, and some expressed its joy.

Some related grown adults, and some a girl or boy.

Some expressed adventure and some told a tragic tale.

Some invoked emotion and some helped us to prevail.

Some taught lessons granted and some talked about the past.

Books were lovely in design; I'm sad they didn't last.

My idea birthing new- you have to make this right.

Grab some paper and a pen, and watch me shed some light.

Do you all tell stories? Yes, I thought you surely did.

Even if they come from someone who is just a kid-

Write them down and share their worth- bring back the written word!

This is what I leave with you; I hope I'm being heard.

I must go back to my home, but spread these newfound strengths.

Reading will evolve your kind and take you to great lengths.

Put it all together and have others take a look.

Now you know what you have missed; I've given back the book …

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you?

J: In 2010 I graduate from Jacksonville State University with my Master's in Secondary English/ Language Arts Education. My bachelor’s degree is in liberal arts with a concentration in English/Lit. Having a solid background in poetry has molded me into a more prolific and precise writer. Before attending JSU, I took art courses from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, or better known as U. A. B. I've written several poetry compilations and have been published through JSU as well. I do have an unpublished novel that doesn't rhyme. I'm saving it. I just love telling tales that use verse to explore the situation at hand. I reworked “Beowulf” into rhyming iambic tetrameter. I mentioned the title earlier- Beowulf: The Midgard Epic. It stays true to the original in every way. The only difference is it rhymes. It also contains “The Wanderer” as an epilogue. I've always felt that classic tale was none other than Wiglaf, the young hero who aided Beowulf against the dragon. I did the cover and interior illustrations. I'm signed with a wonderful indie press called Stitched Smile Publications, LLC. I believe I mentioned I'm their resident illustrator earlier. They have many talented authors on board. In fact, several of them are here at Prose! If you're a fan of horror and dark fantasy, they've got what you need. I'm including the link to their website below. I'm a poet first, but I'm also a story teller and an artist. I want to share, motivate, and inspire the literary community abroad. I want to make rhyming hip again. I've always wanted to be a combination of Dr. Seuss and J. R. R. Tolkien. More than anything, I want to encourage everyone out there to follow their dreams. If you believe you can, you will. Thanks for having me, Prose!

Here are a few ways to find me:

http://jamesmatthewbyers.wordpress.com

https://m.facebook.com/Mattbyers40/

www.Twitter.com/MattByers40

https://theprose.com/JamesMByers

https://www.wattpad.com/user/JamesMatthewByers

http://www.stitchedsmilepublications.com/

Well thank you very much, James. It may have been a while coming, but it was worth it. 

You know what to do now – follow, like, comment, love and do all those things that make us as a community unique.

As ever, if you want to feature, or you want someone to feature, get in touch on info@theprose.com

46
16
22
Juice
525 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @JamesMByers
It’s Friday. It’s a good Friday. And it’s actually Good Friday! Of course, every Friday we hungrily delve into a Proser's life in our Friday Feature. This week is no exception, yet is exceptional, as we are finding out all about a Proser that many of us know and love, but want to know more about. He actually answered our questions a while ago, but silly me (Paul), didn't post it for some reason! Please be upstanding for JamesMByers!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
J: Greetings Prose. I'm James Matthew Byers. You guys know me as @JamesMByers.

P: Where do you live?
J: I reside in Wellington, AL. What's special about that? Wellington, New Zealand happens to be where Peter Jackson filmed much of The Lord of the Rings films. I'd like to think of my home as a displaced component of the Shire. After all, our dog is named Arwen … My wife and two of my four children live with me in our above ground “Hobbit hole.”

P: What is your occupation?
J: By day, I'm a mild mannered middle school teacher. But when the sun sets, the mask appears. Then I am James Matthew Byers, writer, poet, and illustrator. Outside of my day job, I'm on the crew at Stitched Smile Publications, LLC as their resident illustrator.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
J: Writing has been an essential element for most of my life. I've been crafting stories and illustrating them since, believe it or not, age three. In sixth grade I had the pleasure of being introduced to poetry via Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken.” It altered the course of my life forever. I began writing songs and poems. I wrote novellas. I illustrated everything. Through education and practice, I have evolved into a focused poet who utilizes rhyming mechanisms to primarily express what's in my soul. I've grown leaps and bounds with the use of meter. I wrote my first rhyming tale my senior year in high school. We had to construct a story similar to Chaucer’s style in “The Canterbury Tales.” I fell in love with combing story telling and rhyming. The rest, as they say, is history.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
J: Reading is why I'm here. I've been an avid reader my whole life. I taught middle school English and reading for ten years. Staying in books increases your vocabulary. It also teaches how plot devices are applied and how characters grow and change in their development. I've read nearly every DragonLance novel out there. Lewis and Tolkien are influences. There are so many! I'm an advocate for people to visit the classics, like “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” “Dracula,” “A Princess of Mars,” and so many other wonderful maps we all need to follow. I read to relax, and professionally, I read to stay relevant. As a writer, you must possess “withitness.”

P: Can you describe your current and future literary ventures?
J: Currently I'm working on several projects for Stitched Smile Publications. I've got a rhyming story called “The Secrets That We Keep” in their latest anthology. It's called Unleashed: Monsters Vs. Zombies. I've also got anther mini epic called “Killer Jelly Beans from Outer Space” in a collection of Easter themed horror tales called Collected Easter Horror Shorts. It's something that a wonderful fellow named Kevin J. Kennedy put together. And there will be sequels to my current release, Beowulf: The Midgard Epic. In May, my poem, “The Dinner Fly,” will be in Weirdbook Magazine issue #35. I'm also going to be in an upcoming issue of Grievous Angel. (http://www.urbanfantasist.com/grievous-angel) The poem is titled “Conundrum of the Irish Sea.” As far as posts here at Prose, the skies the limit. I'll be crafting some nifty story poems, entering challenges, and offering a few surprises.

P: What do you love about Prose?
J: Prose has risen to the top of my favorite social media outlets. This is where I've found my tribe. I enjoy encouraging other writers and poets. I enjoy sharing my work with a community who get it; get me. I'm plugging it like crazy on all my social media venues. I wake up excited every day to see new faces and old friends publish their works. You can't get that kind of excitement just any where. I'm still I awe that I've won three of the weekly challenges. What do I love about Prose? EVERYTHING!!!

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
J: There are so many great books! The classics would be an easy go to, but I'm going to plug a literary hero of mine. J. Robert Kings “Hellmaw: The Incubus Tweets” is my sacrificial lamb. It's out now from The Ed Greenwood Group. (Onder Librum) It's hip, relevant, and quite humorous. This generation would get it, and for reading to be relatable conquers many battles in the most simplistic of fashions. The protagonist/antagonist, Frank Demonkowski keeps you in stitches. I'd like everyone to laugh hardly as they go gently into that good night …

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
J: My senior English teacher, Marie Duncan, definitely played a critical role in who I am today. She's my friend on Facebook. Recently she celebrated her eightieth birthday. I'm so happy she's getting to see me break into this wonderful industry!

P: Describe yourself in three words!
J: Enthusiastic, poetic, unique

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
J: “To a young heart everything is fun.” – Charles Dickens

P: Favourite music to write and/or read to?
J: I'm into so many facets of music. If I'm reading or writing, I primarily stick with soundtrack scores. Conan the Barbarian is a fave. I also love The Last of the Mohicans. Anything John Williams will do. When I illustrate, I alternate between classical, symphonic metal, and Garbage. I've created many entries into the art world while thumping along to “Version 2.0.”

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
J:
Once upon a time we had to write our stories down.
Now you have no books that I have noticed in your town.
What's a book? I'm glad you asked- I'll fill you in right here.
Paper bound containing words, they filled the mind with cheer.
Some expressed a broken heart, and some expressed its joy.
Some related grown adults, and some a girl or boy.
Some expressed adventure and some told a tragic tale.
Some invoked emotion and some helped us to prevail.
Some taught lessons granted and some talked about the past.
Books were lovely in design; I'm sad they didn't last.
My idea birthing new- you have to make this right.
Grab some paper and a pen, and watch me shed some light.
Do you all tell stories? Yes, I thought you surely did.
Even if they come from someone who is just a kid-
Write them down and share their worth- bring back the written word!
This is what I leave with you; I hope I'm being heard.
I must go back to my home, but spread these newfound strengths.
Reading will evolve your kind and take you to great lengths.
Put it all together and have others take a look.
Now you know what you have missed; I've given back the book …

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you?
J: In 2010 I graduate from Jacksonville State University with my Master's in Secondary English/ Language Arts Education. My bachelor’s degree is in liberal arts with a concentration in English/Lit. Having a solid background in poetry has molded me into a more prolific and precise writer. Before attending JSU, I took art courses from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, or better known as U. A. B. I've written several poetry compilations and have been published through JSU as well. I do have an unpublished novel that doesn't rhyme. I'm saving it. I just love telling tales that use verse to explore the situation at hand. I reworked “Beowulf” into rhyming iambic tetrameter. I mentioned the title earlier- Beowulf: The Midgard Epic. It stays true to the original in every way. The only difference is it rhymes. It also contains “The Wanderer” as an epilogue. I've always felt that classic tale was none other than Wiglaf, the young hero who aided Beowulf against the dragon. I did the cover and interior illustrations. I'm signed with a wonderful indie press called Stitched Smile Publications, LLC. I believe I mentioned I'm their resident illustrator earlier. They have many talented authors on board. In fact, several of them are here at Prose! If you're a fan of horror and dark fantasy, they've got what you need. I'm including the link to their website below. I'm a poet first, but I'm also a story teller and an artist. I want to share, motivate, and inspire the literary community abroad. I want to make rhyming hip again. I've always wanted to be a combination of Dr. Seuss and J. R. R. Tolkien. More than anything, I want to encourage everyone out there to follow their dreams. If you believe you can, you will. Thanks for having me, Prose!

Here are a few ways to find me:
http://jamesmatthewbyers.wordpress.com
https://m.facebook.com/Mattbyers40/
www.Twitter.com/MattByers40
https://theprose.com/JamesMByers
https://www.wattpad.com/user/JamesMatthewByers
http://www.stitchedsmilepublications.com/

Well thank you very much, James. It may have been a while coming, but it was worth it. 

You know what to do now – follow, like, comment, love and do all those things that make us as a community unique.

As ever, if you want to feature, or you want someone to feature, get in touch on info@theprose.com
#nonfiction  #news  #opinion  #FridayFeature  #interview 
46
16
22
Juice
525 reads
Load 22 Comments
Login to post comments.
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @istoppedtrying

It’s Friday again. HUZZAH! Of course, this means that we delve into the life of another member of this great writing community of ours. This week we head over to California to meet the very splendid @istoppedtrying

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

I: My name is William and my Prose name is @istoppedtrying.

P: Where do you live?

I: Palo Alto, California.

P: What is your occupation?

I: I am a middle school student braving math tests, structured essays and the social perils of stereotypes.

Writing, (on Prose), is the highlight of my day.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

I: My relationship with writing began with reading as it did for many others. I became entranced with the crude honesty of Cowper and the meaning packed poetry of T.S. Eliot.

I've been reading more and more contemporary poetry as the months go on and the poetry I write has reflected what I read.

I have used writing as a coping tool and as a boat for my "literary exploration."

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

I: Reading adds another depth to literature that I can't achieve through writing exclusively. Street signs and advertisements have a new importance to me.

The most nondescript parts of our society suddenly have so much meaning to me.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures?

I: Possibly some more books (collections of poetry, I don't have the stamina to write a full-length book) and similar individual posts to those I write now.

P: What do you love about Prose?

I: Prose is positive. Though many writers (including me) write about sadness and negativity, the overall vibe of Prose is positive.

This level of opposition creates a desire for me to never stop writing.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

I: The Dream Songs by John Berryman is the most gruesome and vivid anthology of confessional poetry that has ever been written, in my opinion.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

I: I had an English teacher in second grade who saw something "different" in me and allowed me to write a poem instead of a paragraph about The Little Engine that Could.

I've been writing ever since.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

I: Idiosyncratic. Evanescent. Ignorant.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up

I: I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat. -Winston Churchill

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

I: I am a growing fan of alternative, electronic and folktronica music. I write to the latter daily, simmering in the abstract and strange.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

I: Is there a rock and some mud around?

No mud?

My blood will do...

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

I: I find darkness and silence to produce some of my freshest ideas. If silence isn't possible, white noise will do.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

I: I have a speech impediment. I practically cannot pronounce the "r" sound. It began when I was five and has continued, unabated to this day.

This is why I prefer writing to public speaking.

A thousand thanks to William for opening up to us and sharing his life. You know what you’ve got to do now. Follow. Like. Love. Interact. Do the Prose thang. Meanwhile, get in touch if you want to nominate someone, even if it’s yourself. 

Do it on paul@theprose.com or info@theprose.com

28
14
27
Juice
565 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @istoppedtrying
It’s Friday again. HUZZAH! Of course, this means that we delve into the life of another member of this great writing community of ours. This week we head over to California to meet the very splendid @istoppedtrying

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
I: My name is William and my Prose name is @istoppedtrying.

P: Where do you live?
I: Palo Alto, California.

P: What is your occupation?
I: I am a middle school student braving math tests, structured essays and the social perils of stereotypes.

Writing, (on Prose), is the highlight of my day.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
I: My relationship with writing began with reading as it did for many others. I became entranced with the crude honesty of Cowper and the meaning packed poetry of T.S. Eliot.

I've been reading more and more contemporary poetry as the months go on and the poetry I write has reflected what I read.

I have used writing as a coping tool and as a boat for my "literary exploration."

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
I: Reading adds another depth to literature that I can't achieve through writing exclusively. Street signs and advertisements have a new importance to me.

The most nondescript parts of our society suddenly have so much meaning to me.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures?
I: Possibly some more books (collections of poetry, I don't have the stamina to write a full-length book) and similar individual posts to those I write now.

P: What do you love about Prose?

I: Prose is positive. Though many writers (including me) write about sadness and negativity, the overall vibe of Prose is positive.

This level of opposition creates a desire for me to never stop writing.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

I: The Dream Songs by John Berryman is the most gruesome and vivid anthology of confessional poetry that has ever been written, in my opinion.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
I: I had an English teacher in second grade who saw something "different" in me and allowed me to write a poem instead of a paragraph about The Little Engine that Could.

I've been writing ever since.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
I: Idiosyncratic. Evanescent. Ignorant.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up
I: I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat. -Winston Churchill

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

I: I am a growing fan of alternative, electronic and folktronica music. I write to the latter daily, simmering in the abstract and strange.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
I: Is there a rock and some mud around?

No mud?

My blood will do...

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
I: I find darkness and silence to produce some of my freshest ideas. If silence isn't possible, white noise will do.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
I: I have a speech impediment. I practically cannot pronounce the "r" sound. It began when I was five and has continued, unabated to this day.

This is why I prefer writing to public speaking.

A thousand thanks to William for opening up to us and sharing his life. You know what you’ve got to do now. Follow. Like. Love. Interact. Do the Prose thang. Meanwhile, get in touch if you want to nominate someone, even if it’s yourself. 

Do it on paul@theprose.com or info@theprose.com
#nonfiction  #news  #opinion  #FridayFeature  #interview 
28
14
27
Juice
565 reads
Load 27 Comments
Login to post comments.
Advertisement  (turn off)
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @Chessie

Here we are again, and what a trip the last week was! It’s Friday now, and that can only mean one goshdarn thing – Friday Feature. Yes, we get the lowdown on another smashing Proser. This week we head down under to Australia, to meet with @Chessie

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

A: @Chessie , Jocelyn Saunders.

P: Where do you live?

A: Warburton, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.

P: What is your occupation?

A: Class 8 in high school.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

A: So practically my life is writing. I’ve loved writing and reading ever since I was in prep, and probably before then. But my writing wasn’t very good until one day in grade 5, when I was writing, I suddenly realised I never added any detail, so I went to the extreme. It would take me 5 pages to write one conversation. Slowly I have honed in my over describing tendencies but when I’m not paying attention I tend to still do. I started writing scripts when I was in grade 6, I wrote one for my theatre company. It was sadly never used, but at that time I was over describing to the max and writing was a bit long winded for me, so scripts I was sort of like “no description? YES!” And ever since then I’ve been unnaturally obsessed. I started writing poetry in class 7, when I was introduced to it in class and fell in love. It was amazing. I came to the conclusion that I was never going to be fabulous at it, and since then I have loved writing it.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

A: Reading helps me start conversations with many reading buddies and has initiated many friendships. My vocabulary has improved and I save the best for last, I have picked up weird catch phrases like “back the t-rex up” from books.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

A: A lot of my work is not very realism based, as I use my writing to escape. In future posts I look forward to learning how to write movie scripts, and also doing more group projects with a lot of different voices because I have recently joined a writers group.

P: What do you love about Prose?

A: To be honest, I don’t write without incentive so I really like the challenges, because it gives me a reason to write.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

A: Gosh, I love so many books but none of them are really life changing. Except for one but it sounds sort of on the nose but... I am super popular (not) was very effective on me.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

A: My mum? I guess?

P: Describe yourself in three words!

A: Sarcastic, Realist, Caring

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

A: “Sometimes a flame must level a forest to ash before a new growth can begin” – A. G. Howard Splintered.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

A: My favourite music is anything by Evanescence or P!NK. I find it impossible to write to any music, I don’t know why. But I enjoy listening to it when searching for inspiration.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

A: Nothing. Because they wouldn’t understand me. Writing has such a huge influence on collective learning, so they would be highly under-developed and most likely incapable of learning.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

A: Curled up under a blanket with a torch.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

A: I guess, you can talk to me if you need any help with anything. I believe my main purpose in life is to help other people get through hard times, so if you have any problems message me. My facebook is Jocelyn Saunders and my Instagram is joshokittysaunder

Excellent stuff there – thanks so much to Jocelyn. We don’t need to say it, but we will anyway: follow, like, love, interact and Prose. Ya dig?

We still need more Friday Feature victims. Yes, we’ve had a few suggestions and have been approached by virtually NO ONE! So please, come on dearest Prosers....WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU NOW! Get in touch with us at info@theprose.com

19
8
8
Juice
384 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @Chessie
Here we are again, and what a trip the last week was! It’s Friday now, and that can only mean one goshdarn thing – Friday Feature. Yes, we get the lowdown on another smashing Proser. This week we head down under to Australia, to meet with @Chessie

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
A: @Chessie , Jocelyn Saunders.

P: Where do you live?
A: Warburton, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.

P: What is your occupation?
A: Class 8 in high school.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
A: So practically my life is writing. I’ve loved writing and reading ever since I was in prep, and probably before then. But my writing wasn’t very good until one day in grade 5, when I was writing, I suddenly realised I never added any detail, so I went to the extreme. It would take me 5 pages to write one conversation. Slowly I have honed in my over describing tendencies but when I’m not paying attention I tend to still do. I started writing scripts when I was in grade 6, I wrote one for my theatre company. It was sadly never used, but at that time I was over describing to the max and writing was a bit long winded for me, so scripts I was sort of like “no description? YES!” And ever since then I’ve been unnaturally obsessed. I started writing poetry in class 7, when I was introduced to it in class and fell in love. It was amazing. I came to the conclusion that I was never going to be fabulous at it, and since then I have loved writing it.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
A: Reading helps me start conversations with many reading buddies and has initiated many friendships. My vocabulary has improved and I save the best for last, I have picked up weird catch phrases like “back the t-rex up” from books.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
A: A lot of my work is not very realism based, as I use my writing to escape. In future posts I look forward to learning how to write movie scripts, and also doing more group projects with a lot of different voices because I have recently joined a writers group.

P: What do you love about Prose?
A: To be honest, I don’t write without incentive so I really like the challenges, because it gives me a reason to write.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
A: Gosh, I love so many books but none of them are really life changing. Except for one but it sounds sort of on the nose but... I am super popular (not) was very effective on me.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
A: My mum? I guess?

P: Describe yourself in three words!
A: Sarcastic, Realist, Caring

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
A: “Sometimes a flame must level a forest to ash before a new growth can begin” – A. G. Howard Splintered.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
A: My favourite music is anything by Evanescence or P!NK. I find it impossible to write to any music, I don’t know why. But I enjoy listening to it when searching for inspiration.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
A: Nothing. Because they wouldn’t understand me. Writing has such a huge influence on collective learning, so they would be highly under-developed and most likely incapable of learning.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
A: Curled up under a blanket with a torch.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
A: I guess, you can talk to me if you need any help with anything. I believe my main purpose in life is to help other people get through hard times, so if you have any problems message me. My facebook is Jocelyn Saunders and my Instagram is joshokittysaunder

Excellent stuff there – thanks so much to Jocelyn. We don’t need to say it, but we will anyway: follow, like, love, interact and Prose. Ya dig?

We still need more Friday Feature victims. Yes, we’ve had a few suggestions and have been approached by virtually NO ONE! So please, come on dearest Prosers....WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU NOW! Get in touch with us at info@theprose.com
#nonfiction  #news  #culture  #opinion  #FridayFeature 
19
8
8
Juice
384 reads
Load 8 Comments
Login to post comments.
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @Soulhearts

Somehow, it’s already Friday. This is a beautiful thing, as it means we get to hear all about another Proser in our Friday Feature. This week we have one of the most prolific Prosers on here, known and loved by many of the lovely community we have on here. You probably know her as Soulhearts, but you're about to learn much more about her!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

S: Soulhearts is the name I have used on all my social media. I was one of those folks that did not trust the internet when I first learned to use it (maybe that was 6-7 yrs ago) haha, don't judge. I can honestly say I am not from the techie generation. I never really divulged my real name and wanted to hide behind a pen name so the name Soulhearts stuck. But because Prose feels like family, I shall break my anonymity and introduce myself. My name is Madilyn De Leon and it's nice to meet you all.

P: Hey, Madilyn! Where do you live?

S: I live in a little corner of a country called USA , a city called Burke in the state of Virginia.

I know we have some Prosers from Virginia so ‘Hello’ to you guys! #represent

P: What is your occupation?

S: I am a stress absorber. I tenaciously bear all the stress I receive from spoiled and entitled customers everyday. Lol! Can you guess the occupation yet? If you guessed retail then you are right. I am a manager in retail for quite some time now and thus have witnessed all the blemished facets of people you wouldn't want to see. I am not complaining though. I like what I do, I just don't agree to the adage "the customer is always right" because most of the time they are not. Sshhhh! This is a secret ok? I don't want to get fired for saying this hahaha. Seriously, customers need to treat retail workers with more kindness and respect. Like the way you yourself expect to be treated.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

S: Can I say writing is a twin that I cannot be apart from? A conjoined twin attached to my hip, heart, mind and soul. Sometimes it's like a shadow that disappears at night only to come back in the morning. I loved reading when I was younger. Started at elementary with the Golden books, Enid Blyton, Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, then on my teens with Sweet Dreams, Silhouette and Harlequin Romances. Lol. :) So eventually in High School I was exposed to literature and fell in love with Poetry. Loved the works of the great classics like Shakespeare, Eliot, the Browning's, Burns, Frost, Dickinson to name a few. So from my love of reading, I guess is where my love for writing flowed from. Unlike most of you my dear Prosers, I have not written anything in my life besides maybe a couple of assignments needed for English class back in high school. My writing adventure started around three or four year ago on an app called Heyku (name changed to Ku soon after) I saw it being promoted on Facebook and the name Heyku got me interested because I loved the poetic form Haiku. So I tried it and became one of the pioneers of that app. It was an app where you can only write three lines with a limited word count. Not restricted to writing just Haiku though, the format just looks like it's Haiku because of the three lines. That was where I started religiously writing and posting three lines every day. It was a very friendly community. So very much like Prose. I've met so many wonderful and talented writers there. Some of them are now Prosers too. Their encouragements and precious feedbacks has made my pen more confident through the years. I wrote at first not for anything else but to help me cope with what I was going through at that time. 

Now it seems like my writing has a bigger purpose. I always felt so out of place and overwhelmed with the talent I see around me. After all I do not have a degree in writing nor am I an author. But the universe is slowly letting me feel that yes, I can write and that I can inspire others through it. I am proud to say that my Three Lines has made its way in print to Grace Black's Light Lines anthology book for Three Line Thursday, a micro poetry at Into The Void Magazine's 2nd issue, and a poem in another poetry anthology book titled Luminous Echoes. Indulge me in these for these are great achievements for this little fish lost, swimming in a big ocean of words. It's still surreal to see my work in print until now. I only have gratefulness in my heart for the people who saw something good enough in my writing to put it in print.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

S: Reading I think is like salt to a meal. Without reading a person becomes hollow (personal opinion) the meal would be tasteless, bland. Reading brings you to places you have not even seen nor imagined, it lets you experience life in the perspective of other cultures and philosophies. It cultivates a better understanding of people and the world because you expand your horizon and learn to empathize in the process. Reading feeds the brain and makes one a well-rounded individual.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

S: I could not say that I have a current literary venture, but who knows? Maybe someday a poetry book of my own. Something I have never really considered or imagined until now. As for my future posts, I shall continue to listen to my pen and let it steer the direction of my writing. My posts will still be mostly micro poetry. This is what I love and what I think do best.

P: What do you love about Prose?

S: What's there not to love? Prose is a haven of ridiculously talented individuals. Not just talented but kind hearted individuals. The community is very supportive. It is a conducive environment for anyone who wants to read, write and or get better at writing. There is something for everyone. You like Fiction? You got it. Poetry? Horror? Erotica? Haiku? Follow the portals you love to get the content you want to see on your stream. I also love how this app has a vision. It is continuously evolving and trying to get better. The team is very responsive to any issue. I was lost when Ku discontinued. Now I am happy to have found a home in Prose!

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

S: It's hard to recommend just one because there are so many great books out there. But because I have to choose one then "The Prophet" by Kahlil Gibran is a book that I always carry with me. Not carry in my purse ok? Lol but like E.E. Cummings Poem "I Carry Your Heart With Me" it is always in my heart.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

S: If there was a person who made me think that I could write was an English teacher back when I was a junior in high school. She praised my work in front of class. It felt good and it was something that I have never forgotten. I titled that piece "A Rainy Day". It was a short poem about the rain that included frogs, the wind, trees... until now, nature is still very evident in my work. I am alone in this reading and writing life. Not one in my family has the same interest. No one can relate to what I do. So I'm thankful I have Prose, here I find kindred souls.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

S: Passionate, Sincere, and Adventurous. I asked friends to describe me and common answers were Bubbly, Creative and Kind.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

S: Here's a few lines regarding love in Gibran's The Prophet, Love gives naught but itself and takes naught but from itself. Love possesses not nor would it be possessed; for love is sufficient unto love. When you love you should not say, "God is in my heart," but rather, "I am in the heart of God." Try to read at least what the book say about love. It is truly beautiful.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

S: I don't really have a favorite music to read or write to. This doesn't mean I don't like music though. I actually love to sing. I write best when it is quiet. Writing for me is meditative. I need silence to push my pen to bleed. Some favorite songs of mine are Stevie Nick's Landslide (i'm getting old, sentimental) when I hear this. Lynyrd Skynyrd's Freebird takes me to the sky with its killer instrumental/ guitar playing, makes me head bang! Hahaha! I am dizzy after every time.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

S: Come let's ride this time machine back and change the past, find out why the books are all gone.

It will be a sad world without books, without libraries, without shelfies.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

S: It would be my room because that is where I usually spend time after all the hustle and bustle of daily life, I write when everything else is still and quiet.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about your social media accounts?

S: Follow me on Twitter and Instagram. I am also on Lettrs. Forgive me if I don't reply to friend requests on Facebook. You can always message me here or on Twitter and IG. ❤

What a marvellous interview with the lovely Soulhearts. We feel good. Do you feel good? So now you know the drill. Follow. Like. Comment. Love. Do it all and get in touch with us in the usual ways should you wish to take part or want to nominate someone you’d like to see featured here.

58
23
79
Juice
720 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @Soulhearts
Somehow, it’s already Friday. This is a beautiful thing, as it means we get to hear all about another Proser in our Friday Feature. This week we have one of the most prolific Prosers on here, known and loved by many of the lovely community we have on here. You probably know her as Soulhearts, but you're about to learn much more about her!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
S: Soulhearts is the name I have used on all my social media. I was one of those folks that did not trust the internet when I first learned to use it (maybe that was 6-7 yrs ago) haha, don't judge. I can honestly say I am not from the techie generation. I never really divulged my real name and wanted to hide behind a pen name so the name Soulhearts stuck. But because Prose feels like family, I shall break my anonymity and introduce myself. My name is Madilyn De Leon and it's nice to meet you all.

P: Hey, Madilyn! Where do you live?
S: I live in a little corner of a country called USA , a city called Burke in the state of Virginia.

I know we have some Prosers from Virginia so ‘Hello’ to you guys! #represent

P: What is your occupation?
S: I am a stress absorber. I tenaciously bear all the stress I receive from spoiled and entitled customers everyday. Lol! Can you guess the occupation yet? If you guessed retail then you are right. I am a manager in retail for quite some time now and thus have witnessed all the blemished facets of people you wouldn't want to see. I am not complaining though. I like what I do, I just don't agree to the adage "the customer is always right" because most of the time they are not. Sshhhh! This is a secret ok? I don't want to get fired for saying this hahaha. Seriously, customers need to treat retail workers with more kindness and respect. Like the way you yourself expect to be treated.

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
S: Can I say writing is a twin that I cannot be apart from? A conjoined twin attached to my hip, heart, mind and soul. Sometimes it's like a shadow that disappears at night only to come back in the morning. I loved reading when I was younger. Started at elementary with the Golden books, Enid Blyton, Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys, then on my teens with Sweet Dreams, Silhouette and Harlequin Romances. Lol. :) So eventually in High School I was exposed to literature and fell in love with Poetry. Loved the works of the great classics like Shakespeare, Eliot, the Browning's, Burns, Frost, Dickinson to name a few. So from my love of reading, I guess is where my love for writing flowed from. Unlike most of you my dear Prosers, I have not written anything in my life besides maybe a couple of assignments needed for English class back in high school. My writing adventure started around three or four year ago on an app called Heyku (name changed to Ku soon after) I saw it being promoted on Facebook and the name Heyku got me interested because I loved the poetic form Haiku. So I tried it and became one of the pioneers of that app. It was an app where you can only write three lines with a limited word count. Not restricted to writing just Haiku though, the format just looks like it's Haiku because of the three lines. That was where I started religiously writing and posting three lines every day. It was a very friendly community. So very much like Prose. I've met so many wonderful and talented writers there. Some of them are now Prosers too. Their encouragements and precious feedbacks has made my pen more confident through the years. I wrote at first not for anything else but to help me cope with what I was going through at that time. 

Now it seems like my writing has a bigger purpose. I always felt so out of place and overwhelmed with the talent I see around me. After all I do not have a degree in writing nor am I an author. But the universe is slowly letting me feel that yes, I can write and that I can inspire others through it. I am proud to say that my Three Lines has made its way in print to Grace Black's Light Lines anthology book for Three Line Thursday, a micro poetry at Into The Void Magazine's 2nd issue, and a poem in another poetry anthology book titled Luminous Echoes. Indulge me in these for these are great achievements for this little fish lost, swimming in a big ocean of words. It's still surreal to see my work in print until now. I only have gratefulness in my heart for the people who saw something good enough in my writing to put it in print.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
S: Reading I think is like salt to a meal. Without reading a person becomes hollow (personal opinion) the meal would be tasteless, bland. Reading brings you to places you have not even seen nor imagined, it lets you experience life in the perspective of other cultures and philosophies. It cultivates a better understanding of people and the world because you expand your horizon and learn to empathize in the process. Reading feeds the brain and makes one a well-rounded individual.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
S: I could not say that I have a current literary venture, but who knows? Maybe someday a poetry book of my own. Something I have never really considered or imagined until now. As for my future posts, I shall continue to listen to my pen and let it steer the direction of my writing. My posts will still be mostly micro poetry. This is what I love and what I think do best.

P: What do you love about Prose?
S: What's there not to love? Prose is a haven of ridiculously talented individuals. Not just talented but kind hearted individuals. The community is very supportive. It is a conducive environment for anyone who wants to read, write and or get better at writing. There is something for everyone. You like Fiction? You got it. Poetry? Horror? Erotica? Haiku? Follow the portals you love to get the content you want to see on your stream. I also love how this app has a vision. It is continuously evolving and trying to get better. The team is very responsive to any issue. I was lost when Ku discontinued. Now I am happy to have found a home in Prose!

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
S: It's hard to recommend just one because there are so many great books out there. But because I have to choose one then "The Prophet" by Kahlil Gibran is a book that I always carry with me. Not carry in my purse ok? Lol but like E.E. Cummings Poem "I Carry Your Heart With Me" it is always in my heart.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
S: If there was a person who made me think that I could write was an English teacher back when I was a junior in high school. She praised my work in front of class. It felt good and it was something that I have never forgotten. I titled that piece "A Rainy Day". It was a short poem about the rain that included frogs, the wind, trees... until now, nature is still very evident in my work. I am alone in this reading and writing life. Not one in my family has the same interest. No one can relate to what I do. So I'm thankful I have Prose, here I find kindred souls.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
S: Passionate, Sincere, and Adventurous. I asked friends to describe me and common answers were Bubbly, Creative and Kind.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
S: Here's a few lines regarding love in Gibran's The Prophet, Love gives naught but itself and takes naught but from itself. Love possesses not nor would it be possessed; for love is sufficient unto love. When you love you should not say, "God is in my heart," but rather, "I am in the heart of God." Try to read at least what the book say about love. It is truly beautiful.

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
S: I don't really have a favorite music to read or write to. This doesn't mean I don't like music though. I actually love to sing. I write best when it is quiet. Writing for me is meditative. I need silence to push my pen to bleed. Some favorite songs of mine are Stevie Nick's Landslide (i'm getting old, sentimental) when I hear this. Lynyrd Skynyrd's Freebird takes me to the sky with its killer instrumental/ guitar playing, makes me head bang! Hahaha! I am dizzy after every time.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
S: Come let's ride this time machine back and change the past, find out why the books are all gone.

It will be a sad world without books, without libraries, without shelfies.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
S: It would be my room because that is where I usually spend time after all the hustle and bustle of daily life, I write when everything else is still and quiet.

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about your social media accounts?
S: Follow me on Twitter and Instagram. I am also on Lettrs. Forgive me if I don't reply to friend requests on Facebook. You can always message me here or on Twitter and IG. ❤

What a marvellous interview with the lovely Soulhearts. We feel good. Do you feel good? So now you know the drill. Follow. Like. Comment. Love. Do it all and get in touch with us in the usual ways should you wish to take part or want to nominate someone you’d like to see featured here.
#nonfiction  #philosophy  #news  #opinion  #FridayFeature 
58
23
79
Juice
720 reads
Load 79 Comments
Login to post comments.
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @anjaliparikh1

Friday. What a day. Full of excitement. Full of hope. Full of Friday Feature! Yezzur, it’s that time again, when we get to peek behind the scenes at another Proser’s life. This week we head to Noo Yoik and meet the lovely young woman that is Anjali. Let's do it!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

A: @anjaliparikh1

P: Where do you live?

A: New York

P: What is your occupation?

A: I am a junior in high school

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

A: I used to hate writing. I dreaded it actually, but last year i started reading a book a day because i no longer had my phone. I fell in love with different types of writing and started writing my own novel. It is 70 pages currently. I have become a better writer through reading and writing so much.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

A: I have become a better writer in English class and my vocabulary has expanded. I make a good first impression and find it easier to talk to people.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

A: A lot of my pieces are about my depression and PTSD. It shows how i have been struggling with it and how i am getting over it. You can look forward to recovery posts because I'm on my way there. It gets better.

P: What do you love about Prose?

A: Honestly... this may seem a little vain, but I like that people like my writing and tell me if it's good. I like to read other people's writing and see what's past the surface.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

A: Forgive me Leonard Peacock. It's about suicide, but it is life changing.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

A: I don't, I just went to the library one day and got out a book and I was so engaged I couldn't stop with the next book and the next.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

A: Funny, caring, and random.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

A: "I saw that you were perfect and I loved you. Then I saw you were imperfect and I loved you more."

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

A: My favorite song(s) is any musical composition by Hans Zimmer. I often write to it for inspiration, motivation, and emotion. I highly recommend any writers to listen to him when trying to convey thoughts while writing.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

A: Nothing. I would stay with them. Fight the magical creatures and die heroically. I hope everyone's answer is the same as mine!

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

A: My purple bean bag!

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

A: I guess I would like everyone to know that recovery with depression is slow but it happens. I love everyone and whoever you are out there feel free to contact me, I always want to talk.

Big thanks to Anjali for opening up to us. You all know what happens now. Follow, chat, like and love. It’s the Prose way and that's why we love you all.

Now, why are you all so shy? We need more Friday Feature victims! We’re all for parity here, so where are the lovely mixed bag of people that make up our writing community? 

Women, men, trans, gay, straight, bi, young, old, black, white, yellow, brown and all combinations of all of those and anything else, WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

Get in touch with us, please, at info@theprose.com

22
8
11
Juice
429 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @anjaliparikh1
Friday. What a day. Full of excitement. Full of hope. Full of Friday Feature! Yezzur, it’s that time again, when we get to peek behind the scenes at another Proser’s life. This week we head to Noo Yoik and meet the lovely young woman that is Anjali. Let's do it!

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
A: @anjaliparikh1

P: Where do you live?
A: New York

P: What is your occupation?
A: I am a junior in high school

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
A: I used to hate writing. I dreaded it actually, but last year i started reading a book a day because i no longer had my phone. I fell in love with different types of writing and started writing my own novel. It is 70 pages currently. I have become a better writer through reading and writing so much.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
A: I have become a better writer in English class and my vocabulary has expanded. I make a good first impression and find it easier to talk to people.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
A: A lot of my pieces are about my depression and PTSD. It shows how i have been struggling with it and how i am getting over it. You can look forward to recovery posts because I'm on my way there. It gets better.

P: What do you love about Prose?
A: Honestly... this may seem a little vain, but I like that people like my writing and tell me if it's good. I like to read other people's writing and see what's past the surface.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
A: Forgive me Leonard Peacock. It's about suicide, but it is life changing.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
A: I don't, I just went to the library one day and got out a book and I was so engaged I couldn't stop with the next book and the next.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
A: Funny, caring, and random.

P: Is there one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
A: "I saw that you were perfect and I loved you. Then I saw you were imperfect and I loved you more."

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
A: My favorite song(s) is any musical composition by Hans Zimmer. I often write to it for inspiration, motivation, and emotion. I highly recommend any writers to listen to him when trying to convey thoughts while writing.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
A: Nothing. I would stay with them. Fight the magical creatures and die heroically. I hope everyone's answer is the same as mine!

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
A: My purple bean bag!

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
A: I guess I would like everyone to know that recovery with depression is slow but it happens. I love everyone and whoever you are out there feel free to contact me, I always want to talk.

Big thanks to Anjali for opening up to us. You all know what happens now. Follow, chat, like and love. It’s the Prose way and that's why we love you all.

Now, why are you all so shy? We need more Friday Feature victims! We’re all for parity here, so where are the lovely mixed bag of people that make up our writing community? 

Women, men, trans, gay, straight, bi, young, old, black, white, yellow, brown and all combinations of all of those and anything else, WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

Get in touch with us, please, at info@theprose.com

#nonfiction  #news  #culture  #FF  #FridayFeature 
22
8
11
Juice
429 reads
Load 11 Comments
Login to post comments.
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose

Friday Feature: @EriduSerpent

Greetings Prosers. It’s that sunshine and hope filled day that is Friday. The weekend stretches out ahead of us and the possibilities are endless. But for now, that day means one thing – it’s Friday Feature time! Today we head to Europe and meet the smashing character that is @EriduSerpent

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?

E: My name is Melloney, my Proser name is EriduSerpent

P: Where do you live?

E: I live in Southern Spain, in Granada, Andalucia

P: What is your occupation?

E: I was trained in the print industry, paste-up, lead type etc Then graphic art. But due to my health I am now just the villages odd English animal person/witch. I have online diplomas in general counselling, interior design and hypnotism, but I learn things then tire of them. I´m also trained in Tibetan massage and herbal medicine. I used to work around the village for donations, but got fed up of people giving me eggs as payment and telling people I was a lesbian witch. I heal with my hands and so they think I am a witch and I am single and cannot be bothered to get a boyfriend, so they assume I am gay. Which I am not, it is just Johnny Lee Miller is already happily married and Marilyn Manson is too freaky and kinky in bed, I am a lay back and let them get on with it type (while I watch tv) so he would not be interested in me. I also hate ironing and if you have a relationship it seems to entail that!

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?

E: First of all I am not big on relationships so the fact that I have a very serious one with writing means I respect and love it and would not mind if I had to cook or iron for it, if need be.

It has evolved over the years from being fun to therapy, then back to fun.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?

E: I barely read now, I used to a lot, mainly non-fiction, my brain craved knowledge and facts.

It was a way of dealing with stress and PTSD etc I am a greedy selfish writer, so my own work interests me more.

Now unless it is something I want to know about, most books mean nothing to me. I am lazy I watch tv instead of opening a book.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?

E: I have none, I wrote a novel, two poetry books, posted them online and then felt betrayed. When they were listed as free hundreds of people downloaded them and sent me emails and reviewed them etc. I was told my novel was funny, quirky, sad and so good people did not put it down etc. But when I tried to sell it even for a pittance no one paid for it. It made me feel like people take writers for granted, they have no idea how long it can take to write a book. They do not understand the emotional process which goes to writing a book of poems, you share your inner most thoughts and feelings with the world. Agents told me my book was good but just not on a fashionable subject, they suggested I write a vampire romance or something along the lines of 50 shades (of complete cack). 

That is what sells! I did begin a vampire novel but found that I was hindered somewhat by the fact that I wanted to vomit. My daughter Fawn keeps asking me to finish it because she lurves one of the male characters named Alexander. I did have a full novel written, it was titled Black Out and about a biological weapon used in New York. I backed it up on a thumb drive, was tweaking it etc and my grandson Jesus bounced on my bed and knocked the thumb drive from my laptop…it formatted itself and never functioned again. I was pretty pissed off as when I went to try to write it again the words just would not come, the characters were flat, the scenes were bland, so I stopped trying. I have considered writing it as a screenplay for a movie but damn I am so lazy! So now I just write poems and prose, and create/post memes etc

P: What do you love about Prose?

E: I love that it is a community which does not judge, it is full of all types of writers, all colours, religions, crap writers, just meh! writers, good writers and wonderful writers.

It´s a friendly place, if you like, one could say it is a utopia for writers. I have a theory that if the world just contained poets and vegans it would be a peaceful, blissful heavenly place. Poets are calm, friendly and almost too polite for their own good…same as vegans.

I enjoy the challenges, writers can get in a rut at times, as one tends to write per how they feel mentally. If you are loved up, you write mush, if you are sad you write morbidly, etc etc.

So challenges give you an opportunity to create a new mind set. It gives you new subject matter.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?

E: Anything by Dalai Lama XIV…he is a very wise man.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?

E: Mr Abbot and Mr Granger in my junior school. Mr Abbot would set really cool/hard subjects to write about and Mr Granger read us Roald Dahl if we did our work quickly to round off the school day.

P: Describe yourself in three words!

E: OOOOhhhhwwwwwwwwwwwwww ummmmm…

I would like to say I am HONEST, which is true as I do not lie but I put a fake face on for people so am I really honest? I pretend to like people when really, I just do not need them, I am in fact indifferent, I do it to be polite. Also being honest causes me problems as I will say what I think if I deem it the only logical answer or reply.

Hmmmm I am PROTECTIVE for sure, if any one does me or my loved ones wrong, they will pay dearly.

SELFLESS…I am not a greedy person, I prefer to share and help others, especially animals. I am fairly low income but most of my money goes on donations to animal sanctuaries and causes. I pay to feed strays/get vet care for the animals in the village that I live in. I learnt many years ago at a time when I had a lot of money that it did not make me happy, being poorer has been more for-filling to me.

BUT others say I am: Autistic, eccentric and odd.

Others: Extremely intelligent, unsociable, and a brilliant cook...some just say "Damned scary" or call me Sheldon.

P: Is there´s one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?

E: I have two on my Facebook account:

“If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.” ― Dalai Lama XIV.

I like it because it sums me up, I am just a small chubby woman but I can move mountains with my strength, my words or my voice, my knowledge, if need be. Not enough people stand up for what is right and many have excepted their role as mere sheep. I can be one mean nasty mosquito when I believe an injustice or crime has been committed.

AND

" And I'm a country you don't ever, ever, ever, ever, ever wanna visit again" ― Marilyn Manson

This because I have a dark side which I keep in check (mostly)

Take what you want from those hahaha!

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?

E: I LOVE Marilyn Manson, he is very intelligent, love his voice, it makes me wobbly at the knees. I also adore Sia and Banks, I like a good strong song to sing too. I like violin and cello music, Bach for instance. I listen to Tibetan Buddhist chants and Japanese music, not the new stuff the old Edo material. But I write to none of it, as it is too much interference for my brain.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?

E: I tell them nothing and ask how they store their written word and how far back does their storage go…Words do not need to be in pages of a book. Some of the best stories are told by word of mouth only. As long as one has a way to read or write, I do not really care.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?

E: My huge comfy bed!

I suffer from chronic insomnia and get ill a lot so I spend a lot of time awake in bed.

My mind is most active and functional between 2 & 4am…so I tend to write a lot then, I also kick at Scrabble, Monopoly, Sudoku, Trivia quizzes etc in those hours! hahaha

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?

E: I love the work of Brian Patten and Lord Byron.

I enjoy reading religious texts, such as The dead sea scrolls, bibles, The book of Enoch, Black magic books, mythological tales, conspiracy stuff, alien and weird things. I like watching scifi shows (Long live the Brown Coats) and detective shows (but I piss people off by telling them the plot before it is shown) and deep down I would have liked to have been a paid assassin preferably one using a sniper rife :o) (I love humans really) or someone like the Sherlock Holmes character.

Ummmm and after answering these questions I think I am definitely mentally unstable but just a tad!

For the record I own no guns and they do not allow them here in Spain.

We love it when a Proser really GIVES in one of these Friday Features, and she did give. You know what happens now. Be nice, follow, comment, like and be Prose-y as per usual. 

Thanks to @EriduSerpent for her time and her honesty all the way from sunny Spain!

32
13
19
Juice
375 reads
Donate coins to Prose.
Juice
Cancel
Written by Prose in portal Prose
Friday Feature: @EriduSerpent
Greetings Prosers. It’s that sunshine and hope filled day that is Friday. The weekend stretches out ahead of us and the possibilities are endless. But for now, that day means one thing – it’s Friday Feature time! Today we head to Europe and meet the smashing character that is @EriduSerpent

P: What is your given name and your Proser username?
E: My name is Melloney, my Proser name is EriduSerpent

P: Where do you live?
E: I live in Southern Spain, in Granada, Andalucia

P: What is your occupation?
E: I was trained in the print industry, paste-up, lead type etc Then graphic art. But due to my health I am now just the villages odd English animal person/witch. I have online diplomas in general counselling, interior design and hypnotism, but I learn things then tire of them. I´m also trained in Tibetan massage and herbal medicine. I used to work around the village for donations, but got fed up of people giving me eggs as payment and telling people I was a lesbian witch. I heal with my hands and so they think I am a witch and I am single and cannot be bothered to get a boyfriend, so they assume I am gay. Which I am not, it is just Johnny Lee Miller is already happily married and Marilyn Manson is too freaky and kinky in bed, I am a lay back and let them get on with it type (while I watch tv) so he would not be interested in me. I also hate ironing and if you have a relationship it seems to entail that!

P: What is your relationship with writing and how has it evolved?
E: First of all I am not big on relationships so the fact that I have a very serious one with writing means I respect and love it and would not mind if I had to cook or iron for it, if need be.

It has evolved over the years from being fun to therapy, then back to fun.

P: What value does reading add to both your personal and professional life?
E: I barely read now, I used to a lot, mainly non-fiction, my brain craved knowledge and facts.

It was a way of dealing with stress and PTSD etc I am a greedy selfish writer, so my own work interests me more.

Now unless it is something I want to know about, most books mean nothing to me. I am lazy I watch tv instead of opening a book.

P: Can you describe your current literary ventures and what can we look forward to in future posts?
E: I have none, I wrote a novel, two poetry books, posted them online and then felt betrayed. When they were listed as free hundreds of people downloaded them and sent me emails and reviewed them etc. I was told my novel was funny, quirky, sad and so good people did not put it down etc. But when I tried to sell it even for a pittance no one paid for it. It made me feel like people take writers for granted, they have no idea how long it can take to write a book. They do not understand the emotional process which goes to writing a book of poems, you share your inner most thoughts and feelings with the world. Agents told me my book was good but just not on a fashionable subject, they suggested I write a vampire romance or something along the lines of 50 shades (of complete cack). 

That is what sells! I did begin a vampire novel but found that I was hindered somewhat by the fact that I wanted to vomit. My daughter Fawn keeps asking me to finish it because she lurves one of the male characters named Alexander. I did have a full novel written, it was titled Black Out and about a biological weapon used in New York. I backed it up on a thumb drive, was tweaking it etc and my grandson Jesus bounced on my bed and knocked the thumb drive from my laptop…it formatted itself and never functioned again. I was pretty pissed off as when I went to try to write it again the words just would not come, the characters were flat, the scenes were bland, so I stopped trying. I have considered writing it as a screenplay for a movie but damn I am so lazy! So now I just write poems and prose, and create/post memes etc

P: What do you love about Prose?
E: I love that it is a community which does not judge, it is full of all types of writers, all colours, religions, crap writers, just meh! writers, good writers and wonderful writers.
It´s a friendly place, if you like, one could say it is a utopia for writers. I have a theory that if the world just contained poets and vegans it would be a peaceful, blissful heavenly place. Poets are calm, friendly and almost too polite for their own good…same as vegans.
I enjoy the challenges, writers can get in a rut at times, as one tends to write per how they feel mentally. If you are loved up, you write mush, if you are sad you write morbidly, etc etc.

So challenges give you an opportunity to create a new mind set. It gives you new subject matter.

P: Is there one book that you would recommend everybody should read before they die?
E: Anything by Dalai Lama XIV…he is a very wise man.

P: Do you have an unsung hero who got you into reading and/or writing?
E: Mr Abbot and Mr Granger in my junior school. Mr Abbot would set really cool/hard subjects to write about and Mr Granger read us Roald Dahl if we did our work quickly to round off the school day.

P: Describe yourself in three words!
E: OOOOhhhhwwwwwwwwwwwwww ummmmm…

I would like to say I am HONEST, which is true as I do not lie but I put a fake face on for people so am I really honest? I pretend to like people when really, I just do not need them, I am in fact indifferent, I do it to be polite. Also being honest causes me problems as I will say what I think if I deem it the only logical answer or reply.

Hmmmm I am PROTECTIVE for sure, if any one does me or my loved ones wrong, they will pay dearly.

SELFLESS…I am not a greedy person, I prefer to share and help others, especially animals. I am fairly low income but most of my money goes on donations to animal sanctuaries and causes. I pay to feed strays/get vet care for the animals in the village that I live in. I learnt many years ago at a time when I had a lot of money that it did not make me happy, being poorer has been more for-filling to me.

BUT others say I am: Autistic, eccentric and odd.

Others: Extremely intelligent, unsociable, and a brilliant cook...some just say "Damned scary" or call me Sheldon.

P: Is there´s one quote, from a writer or otherwise, that sums you up?
E: I have two on my Facebook account:
“If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.” ― Dalai Lama XIV.

I like it because it sums me up, I am just a small chubby woman but I can move mountains with my strength, my words or my voice, my knowledge, if need be. Not enough people stand up for what is right and many have excepted their role as mere sheep. I can be one mean nasty mosquito when I believe an injustice or crime has been committed.

AND

" And I'm a country you don't ever, ever, ever, ever, ever wanna visit again" ― Marilyn Manson

This because I have a dark side which I keep in check (mostly)

Take what you want from those hahaha!

P: What is your favourite music, and do you write or read to it?
E: I LOVE Marilyn Manson, he is very intelligent, love his voice, it makes me wobbly at the knees. I also adore Sia and Banks, I like a good strong song to sing too. I like violin and cello music, Bach for instance. I listen to Tibetan Buddhist chants and Japanese music, not the new stuff the old Edo material. But I write to none of it, as it is too much interference for my brain.

P: You climb out of a time machine into a dystopian future with no books. What do you tell them?
E: I tell them nothing and ask how they store their written word and how far back does their storage go…Words do not need to be in pages of a book. Some of the best stories are told by word of mouth only. As long as one has a way to read or write, I do not really care.

P: Do you have a favourite place to read and write?
E: My huge comfy bed!

I suffer from chronic insomnia and get ill a lot so I spend a lot of time awake in bed.
My mind is most active and functional between 2 & 4am…so I tend to write a lot then, I also kick at Scrabble, Monopoly, Sudoku, Trivia quizzes etc in those hours! hahaha

P: Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you/your work/social media accounts?
E: I love the work of Brian Patten and Lord Byron.

I enjoy reading religious texts, such as The dead sea scrolls, bibles, The book of Enoch, Black magic books, mythological tales, conspiracy stuff, alien and weird things. I like watching scifi shows (Long live the Brown Coats) and detective shows (but I piss people off by telling them the plot before it is shown) and deep down I would have liked to have been a paid assassin preferably one using a sniper rife :o) (I love humans really) or someone like the Sherlock Holmes character.

Ummmm and after answering these questions I think I am definitely mentally unstable but just a tad!

For the record I own no guns and they do not allow them here in Spain.

We love it when a Proser really GIVES in one of these Friday Features, and she did give. You know what happens now. Be nice, follow, comment, like and be Prose-y as per usual. 

Thanks to @EriduSerpent for her time and her honesty all the way from sunny Spain!

#nonfiction  #philosophy  #news  #FF  #FridayFeature 
32
13
19
Juice
375 reads
Load 19 Comments
Login to post comments.