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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by brokenwing in portal Seattle Refined

Mark Left Behind

Sun bound, wind driven

As soaring bird over mountain trail

Unencumbered by maddening voices

Imagined, though willing me to fail

Over turbulent ocean and restless sea

You can’t save me, my soul is free

From the burden of love’s loss

With word and deed unsung

No walks through heavy sand

In weary no man’s land

Where sun’s rays are yet to be

You can’t save me, my heart is free

My mark left behind: A trail of notes

Sacred words on sullen canvas

Bleeding sound, one color into another

Ethereal voice to pierce one’s soul

Comfort when reason’s lost its way

In confusion, broken hearts to pay

Walk not alone this earthen path

In numbers, strength be found

When mind speaks its trouble

Illuminating shadow’s rust

A caged heart learns to fly

You can’t save me, my mind is free

But, save yourself you must

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by brokenwing in portal Seattle Refined
Mark Left Behind
Sun bound, wind driven
As soaring bird over mountain trail
Unencumbered by maddening voices
Imagined, though willing me to fail
Over turbulent ocean and restless sea
You can’t save me, my soul is free

From the burden of love’s loss
With word and deed unsung
No walks through heavy sand
In weary no man’s land
Where sun’s rays are yet to be
You can’t save me, my heart is free

My mark left behind: A trail of notes
Sacred words on sullen canvas
Bleeding sound, one color into another
Ethereal voice to pierce one’s soul
Comfort when reason’s lost its way
In confusion, broken hearts to pay

Walk not alone this earthen path
In numbers, strength be found
When mind speaks its trouble
Illuminating shadow’s rust
A caged heart learns to fly
You can’t save me, my mind is free

But, save yourself you must
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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by AliCornelliac in portal Seattle Refined

Celestial Being

Chris wasn't just a musician. He touched, saved, and shaped a lot of lives. If it wasn't for him, I wouldn't be doing the only thing, thanks to him, I found out I was good at. But how can a person have such an impact on your life through their music? Well, that's just how he was. He was my best friend. He would say what I wanted to hear. He would play what I wanted to learn to play. I'd go to sleep listening to his voice and his music, and wake up in the morning doing the same. I never met him, but he was always with me. I don't miss him because he'll always be with me. Like a part of my body, he'll always be a part of me. Goodbye, celestial being. Forever my Rock God, forever my all. I love you. Always will. You're my everything. Thank you for everything.

Ali.

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by AliCornelliac in portal Seattle Refined
Celestial Being
Chris wasn't just a musician. He touched, saved, and shaped a lot of lives. If it wasn't for him, I wouldn't be doing the only thing, thanks to him, I found out I was good at. But how can a person have such an impact on your life through their music? Well, that's just how he was. He was my best friend. He would say what I wanted to hear. He would play what I wanted to learn to play. I'd go to sleep listening to his voice and his music, and wake up in the morning doing the same. I never met him, but he was always with me. I don't miss him because he'll always be with me. Like a part of my body, he'll always be a part of me. Goodbye, celestial being. Forever my Rock God, forever my all. I love you. Always will. You're my everything. Thank you for everything.

Ali.

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by enigmainaskirt in portal Seattle Refined

Dear Chris,

I grew up around music and the music industry for the formative years of my life - from rehearsal studios to tour buses, to backstage green rooms at the House of Blues in LA. Music has always meant a lot to me, and has been deeply engrained in my heart and soul - but never had anything awakened my true, profound love for it until I started learning "Like A Stone" on guitar.

Any time I heard the song (before learning how to play it), something about your voice and the way the guitar's slow accompaniment complimented it and matched your emotion tugged at something deep in my subconscious. I found myself feeling ecstatic whenever I heard those first couple bars, and then as I listened further, a strong, meditative feeling washed over me, and I would ride that throughout the rest of my day.

But when I decided to look up the chords, I was "forced" to read (and for the first time, really pay attention to) the lyrics. That was the first time I had really paid attention to the song, and wow, was I moved. Your words brought me to tears. The meditative sensation the song had always brought to me suddenly made so much more sense, and I felt my heart both swell with empathy and break with sympathy at the longing and yearning heard in your voice. This made me curious as to what the video looked like, so I looked that up, too, and I was in awe. I'm not sure whether the rumors are true, but I heard somewhere that it genuinely was just a band rehearsal where someone decided to record video. If that is true (which I've always taken it as truth), then... your face. The look on your face, throughout the song... just told me that you meant every syllable of every word in that song with every fiber of your being. Regardless of whether or not it was "just a band rehearsal", that emotion... I don't feel it can be faked. And seeing that level of truth from someone in the music industry was simply breathtaking for me.

You forever changed my perception of music, and the reasons that I love it as much as I do and in the way that I do. Ever since then, I've wanted to have the verse "for all that I've blessed, and all that I've wronged - in dreams, until my death, I will wander on" for a tattoo. Maybe that sounds ridiculous to you, getting someone else's words forever written on my body. But they're already forever etched on my heart - a tattoo would just be a physical manifestation of it.

I regret that I never got to see you perform, and - as unlikely as it may have been - that I never got to meet you. Although we never knew each other, your loss will be profoundly felt by me for many, many years to come; I feel like I've lost someone very close to me.

May your wandering be done, and may you be at peace.

Love,

Jaden

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by enigmainaskirt in portal Seattle Refined
Dear Chris,

I grew up around music and the music industry for the formative years of my life - from rehearsal studios to tour buses, to backstage green rooms at the House of Blues in LA. Music has always meant a lot to me, and has been deeply engrained in my heart and soul - but never had anything awakened my true, profound love for it until I started learning "Like A Stone" on guitar.

Any time I heard the song (before learning how to play it), something about your voice and the way the guitar's slow accompaniment complimented it and matched your emotion tugged at something deep in my subconscious. I found myself feeling ecstatic whenever I heard those first couple bars, and then as I listened further, a strong, meditative feeling washed over me, and I would ride that throughout the rest of my day.

But when I decided to look up the chords, I was "forced" to read (and for the first time, really pay attention to) the lyrics. That was the first time I had really paid attention to the song, and wow, was I moved. Your words brought me to tears. The meditative sensation the song had always brought to me suddenly made so much more sense, and I felt my heart both swell with empathy and break with sympathy at the longing and yearning heard in your voice. This made me curious as to what the video looked like, so I looked that up, too, and I was in awe. I'm not sure whether the rumors are true, but I heard somewhere that it genuinely was just a band rehearsal where someone decided to record video. If that is true (which I've always taken it as truth), then... your face. The look on your face, throughout the song... just told me that you meant every syllable of every word in that song with every fiber of your being. Regardless of whether or not it was "just a band rehearsal", that emotion... I don't feel it can be faked. And seeing that level of truth from someone in the music industry was simply breathtaking for me.

You forever changed my perception of music, and the reasons that I love it as much as I do and in the way that I do. Ever since then, I've wanted to have the verse "for all that I've blessed, and all that I've wronged - in dreams, until my death, I will wander on" for a tattoo. Maybe that sounds ridiculous to you, getting someone else's words forever written on my body. But they're already forever etched on my heart - a tattoo would just be a physical manifestation of it.


I regret that I never got to see you perform, and - as unlikely as it may have been - that I never got to meet you. Although we never knew each other, your loss will be profoundly felt by me for many, many years to come; I feel like I've lost someone very close to me.

May your wandering be done, and may you be at peace.

Love,
Jaden
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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by WanderLustGirl in portal Seattle Refined

Dance with Mortality

I loved the intensity of your music…the soaring heights of your voice. I was mesmerized by your mischievous smile…that halo of hair…your eyes…your swagger. Maybe I didn’t realize how much I cared until I heard about your death. The news hit like a punch in the gut and I’m reeling with disbelief at the depth of my sadness. Maybe in some ways, this grief I feel is a cathartic release for all the angst, pain, emotion and relief tied to my own dance with mortality. Maybe when I see you again, I will tell you that I understood. Maybe then, we will both be at peace.

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by WanderLustGirl in portal Seattle Refined
Dance with Mortality
I loved the intensity of your music…the soaring heights of your voice. I was mesmerized by your mischievous smile…that halo of hair…your eyes…your swagger. Maybe I didn’t realize how much I cared until I heard about your death. The news hit like a punch in the gut and I’m reeling with disbelief at the depth of my sadness. Maybe in some ways, this grief I feel is a cathartic release for all the angst, pain, emotion and relief tied to my own dance with mortality. Maybe when I see you again, I will tell you that I understood. Maybe then, we will both be at peace.
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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by braeyn in portal Seattle Refined

Closing my eyes

Never to be heard again in person

Chris Cornell

With his dark searching voice,

Twisted and piercing lyrics

Man who laid his soul bare in music

That made generations feel

A little less alone

A great loss

A great man

I bow my head in grief

And gratitude

Put the song on repeat

Rest in peace, Chris

You will never be forgotten

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by braeyn in portal Seattle Refined
Closing my eyes
Never to be heard again in person
Chris Cornell
With his dark searching voice,
Twisted and piercing lyrics
Man who laid his soul bare in music
That made generations feel
A little less alone

A great loss
A great man
I bow my head in grief
And gratitude
Put the song on repeat
Rest in peace, Chris
You will never be forgotten
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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by Infosourcer in portal Seattle Refined

When we first met...in Paris

Chris, the world is a much sadder and darker place without your enormous, generous presence, not to mention your brilliant, heartfelt lyrics and songs. Still can't wrap my arms around this. And something still doesn't sit right. All I can do is share some wonderful memories....

Fast rewind to 1989. Soundgarden had released "Louder Than Love". I was Label Manager for A&M Records in Paris, and the band came to Paris for some promos and a concert. When I first heard the album, I KNEW this was something huge. It was so frikking raw, powerful, & beautiful. Then I met the band and Susan.

I remember when the band was doing CD signings in a small but popular record store. There were maybe 10 people that showed up. Then they did a sold-out concert in a small venue. The show was literally EXPLOSIVE and unreal.Imagine being a part of the initial days of this amazing band. I feel so very lucky and grateful.

While you, Chris, were very reserved and stayed mostly by Susan's side, I felt your kindness shine through your shy demeanor. I had the great pleasure to hang with Matt, Ben, and Kim a few fun evenings, musing about all the travels and promos and concerts the band had to still go through. Matt was a major sweetie, even writing me letters from their overseas tour supporting Guns & Roses.

I left Paris shortly after our meeting, and regretfully, I moved to Miami. I should have moved to Seattle and continue my music career and watch the Seattle scene blossom.

I LOVED every single Seattle band- I am so saddened by the losses. But this music is truly its own and is very important to everyone and it will , as you can tell from all the posts and tributes globally.

Then I was very lucky to see Soundgarden live again, in 2011, in Vancouver BC. Funny, I now live 1.5 hours north of Seattle for the past 9 years. I have not been able to make any contact with the Soundgarden folks, but hopefully that changes soon.

Lastly, when I heard Temple of the Dog was doing 7 shows in 5 locations last year, I jumped on the occasion and bought tickets for the first San Francisco show. I knew about Andy Wood and Chris's close relation, and I was a major fan of Mother Love Bone and TOTD tribute album.I was literally blown away and became very emotional. It was literally the best concert I have ever been to. And I have been to MANY. Chris was amazing, as was Matt and Stone, Mike, and Jeff. 

Never would I have imagined that I would never see or hear you again, Chris. This whole nightmare doesn't remind me of anything. I am hoping for the truth to come out. It would help in healing the raw wounds I (and so many others) have. Even if we did not have a close relationship, you have impacted my life in so many ways. This last chapter is not the last. XOXOXO ~Suzy

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by Infosourcer in portal Seattle Refined
When we first met...in Paris
Chris, the world is a much sadder and darker place without your enormous, generous presence, not to mention your brilliant, heartfelt lyrics and songs. Still can't wrap my arms around this. And something still doesn't sit right. All I can do is share some wonderful memories....
Fast rewind to 1989. Soundgarden had released "Louder Than Love". I was Label Manager for A&M Records in Paris, and the band came to Paris for some promos and a concert. When I first heard the album, I KNEW this was something huge. It was so frikking raw, powerful, & beautiful. Then I met the band and Susan.
I remember when the band was doing CD signings in a small but popular record store. There were maybe 10 people that showed up. Then they did a sold-out concert in a small venue. The show was literally EXPLOSIVE and unreal.Imagine being a part of the initial days of this amazing band. I feel so very lucky and grateful.
While you, Chris, were very reserved and stayed mostly by Susan's side, I felt your kindness shine through your shy demeanor. I had the great pleasure to hang with Matt, Ben, and Kim a few fun evenings, musing about all the travels and promos and concerts the band had to still go through. Matt was a major sweetie, even writing me letters from their overseas tour supporting Guns & Roses.
I left Paris shortly after our meeting, and regretfully, I moved to Miami. I should have moved to Seattle and continue my music career and watch the Seattle scene blossom.
I LOVED every single Seattle band- I am so saddened by the losses. But this music is truly its own and is very important to everyone and it will , as you can tell from all the posts and tributes globally.
Then I was very lucky to see Soundgarden live again, in 2011, in Vancouver BC. Funny, I now live 1.5 hours north of Seattle for the past 9 years. I have not been able to make any contact with the Soundgarden folks, but hopefully that changes soon.
Lastly, when I heard Temple of the Dog was doing 7 shows in 5 locations last year, I jumped on the occasion and bought tickets for the first San Francisco show. I knew about Andy Wood and Chris's close relation, and I was a major fan of Mother Love Bone and TOTD tribute album.I was literally blown away and became very emotional. It was literally the best concert I have ever been to. And I have been to MANY. Chris was amazing, as was Matt and Stone, Mike, and Jeff. 
Never would I have imagined that I would never see or hear you again, Chris. This whole nightmare doesn't remind me of anything. I am hoping for the truth to come out. It would help in healing the raw wounds I (and so many others) have. Even if we did not have a close relationship, you have impacted my life in so many ways. This last chapter is not the last. XOXOXO ~Suzy




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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by greycantwrite in portal Seattle Refined

Gone

His fingers shake as he realizes what he has done. His eyes lift up to the heavens as the clock ticks, a monotone tick-tock, counting down the final moments of his life. A noose, perfectly crafted, hangs before him, and he is standing on a chair. He is understanding the kiss of finality on his breath, his movements, his thoughts.

This is it.

Fate has dear Chris now. Chris is- and has been- gone. 

Ths chair falls, without Chris. Now, like his soul has been, his body is gone.

But though it is too late for him, it is not too late for us. There is more to life than death; there are exotic colors and rock concerts and singing birds. There is vibrancy to life that the monochrome depression will not show us; we must reclaim our lives to seek out true joy. We must not live for the night, but for the day. Sleep is not for us to hide from reality, it is to prepare us for our adventures. Life is not for us to hope to die, but to seek out happiness. Chris' death is not for us to imitate, but to trigger us to live in a way he would be proud of.

Life is beautiful if we choose to see it. 

We are not gone. 

And that's just how Chris Cornell likes it.

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by greycantwrite in portal Seattle Refined
Gone
His fingers shake as he realizes what he has done. His eyes lift up to the heavens as the clock ticks, a monotone tick-tock, counting down the final moments of his life. A noose, perfectly crafted, hangs before him, and he is standing on a chair. He is understanding the kiss of finality on his breath, his movements, his thoughts.
This is it.
Fate has dear Chris now. Chris is- and has been- gone. 
Ths chair falls, without Chris. Now, like his soul has been, his body is gone.
But though it is too late for him, it is not too late for us. There is more to life than death; there are exotic colors and rock concerts and singing birds. There is vibrancy to life that the monochrome depression will not show us; we must reclaim our lives to seek out true joy. We must not live for the night, but for the day. Sleep is not for us to hide from reality, it is to prepare us for our adventures. Life is not for us to hope to die, but to seek out happiness. Chris' death is not for us to imitate, but to trigger us to live in a way he would be proud of.
Life is beautiful if we choose to see it. 
We are not gone. 
And that's just how Chris Cornell likes it.
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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by dethkitty in portal Seattle Refined

Our Broken Hearts

I can pinpoint the exact moment I first heard Chris Cornell's voice come through on the radio. I was 17 years old driving, driving my dad's '97 Dodge Stratus, and taking a left turn onto 356th St. from Enchanted Pkwy in Federal Way, WA. The song I that played that night was "Be Yourself" by Audioslave.

Being born in the late 80's, I had was too young to have appreciated the Grunge movement of the 90's. And although I'm sure I had heard a Soundgarden song here and there (having grown up in the Seattle area and all) I had never really listened to it.

Anyway, back to that first moment: 

The melancholy sound of the guitar caught my attention, but it was the voice and the way the words streamed through the radio that actually held it. The voice was unlike anything I've ever heard before. I could actually feel the emotion from each syllable uttered. And the song itself seemed to encompass every little thing I was feeling at that precise moment in my life. 

I was a depressed teenager with way too many issues to handle. I was ready to give up...but there, on the radio, was this man singing, basically reading my mind and still telling me not to lose any sleep, because everything would be alright.

From that moment on, I've been a die-hard fan. I know that many, many people have had their lives touched by Chris Cornell. And now that he's gone...our souls weep, not only for him, but for his family as well. We only got a small part of all that he was, and we are brokenhearted, I can't even begin to imagine how his loved ones must feel.

Chris Cornell is gone, but he will never be forgotten. In a world where people rarely make ripples, he made everlasting waves.

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by dethkitty in portal Seattle Refined
Our Broken Hearts

I can pinpoint the exact moment I first heard Chris Cornell's voice come through on the radio. I was 17 years old driving, driving my dad's '97 Dodge Stratus, and taking a left turn onto 356th St. from Enchanted Pkwy in Federal Way, WA. The song I that played that night was "Be Yourself" by Audioslave.
Being born in the late 80's, I had was too young to have appreciated the Grunge movement of the 90's. And although I'm sure I had heard a Soundgarden song here and there (having grown up in the Seattle area and all) I had never really listened to it.
Anyway, back to that first moment: 
The melancholy sound of the guitar caught my attention, but it was the voice and the way the words streamed through the radio that actually held it. The voice was unlike anything I've ever heard before. I could actually feel the emotion from each syllable uttered. And the song itself seemed to encompass every little thing I was feeling at that precise moment in my life. 
I was a depressed teenager with way too many issues to handle. I was ready to give up...but there, on the radio, was this man singing, basically reading my mind and still telling me not to lose any sleep, because everything would be alright.

From that moment on, I've been a die-hard fan. I know that many, many people have had their lives touched by Chris Cornell. And now that he's gone...our souls weep, not only for him, but for his family as well. We only got a small part of all that he was, and we are brokenhearted, I can't even begin to imagine how his loved ones must feel.
Chris Cornell is gone, but he will never be forgotten. In a world where people rarely make ripples, he made everlasting waves.

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by elainalgblanton in portal Seattle Refined

Thank you

A child so out of place,

Yet you still gave me a happy face.

Out of the gray I heard your voice sing;

The black hole son took me under his wing. 

From then on you were my friend. 

I never thought it would so soon end.

You were one who showed me how to live with the electric beauty that you would so freely give. 

Your  words rage of a healing power that can turn the coldest of rains into a bright sun shower. 

And on my darkest night you bring the light with your euphoria morning 

To honor you, I refuse to keep you in mourning. 

I'll not let my heart stay broken. 

You will live on in the light that you turned into words so mightily  spoken. 

You helped me to heal and you showed me that  it was ok for me to be real.

 And so now as sure your spirit flies high in the skies, I will live  and I will rise. 

Thank you 

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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by elainalgblanton in portal Seattle Refined
Thank you
A child so out of place,
Yet you still gave me a happy face.
Out of the gray I heard your voice sing;
The black hole son took me under his wing. 

From then on you were my friend. 
I never thought it would so soon end.

You were one who showed me how to live with the electric beauty that you would so freely give. 
Your  words rage of a healing power that can turn the coldest of rains into a bright sun shower. 
And on my darkest night you bring the light with your euphoria morning 
To honor you, I refuse to keep you in mourning. 

I'll not let my heart stay broken. 
You will live on in the light that you turned into words so mightily  spoken. 
You helped me to heal and you showed me that  it was ok for me to be real.
 And so now as sure your spirit flies high in the skies, I will live  and I will rise. 
Thank you 





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We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by cammer82 in portal Seattle Refined

GROWING UP GRUNGE: A Tribute to Chris Cornell By Cameron Gardner

I will always be amazed by the power of music. Like nothing else in this world, music is both universal and personal. Universally a quintessential defining feature of the human experience, yet created in such variety and forms as to create tastes and experiences that are intensely personal. Music can mean anything to anyone, music can make us laugh, make us cry, make us smile, make us jump, make us scream. Its power moves us emotionally and physically. Song and dance are the oldest forms of human culture, and arguably the greatest cultural achievements of our species. And thanks to our advancements in technology, music has gained immortality.

We have been fortunate enough to live through a moment in time where an expression of sound organically grew amongst a group of musicians from an underground scene that was cultivated and nurtured in its rainy city, and like a rising tide it surged into a massive wave that became a movement that shook the world and defined a generation. This sound tsunami crashed into the shore and changed the shoreline forever. Tragically in its aftermath, as the wave receded with the tide, we lost much to the dark depths from whence it came, including its most powerful voice.

We have been forever touched by this sound wave, but having lived and experienced it, we are not always able to properly recognize just how incredibly unique and rare it was and is. For the music of one city and its musicians to so effect the world as to become a central part of a generational identity, is unprecedented in history. The music transcended languages, boundaries, cultures and even the music itself. Inevitably, in our human need to label everything, we named it grunge.

The artists themselves always had a difficult time being labelled grunge. The word often became associated more with image than with sound, which never sat well with artists who were notoriously anti-image and believed in a moral obligation to preserve the purity of musical and artistic authenticity. The artists had lost control of the creature they created and it was bigger than any of them had ever dared imagine. With it came tremendous pressure. The artists were extremely uncomfortable being idolized as the voices of a generation. This humble and honest discomfort with fame only made them more endearing, more human, more authentic. Grunge never sold out. Grunge didn’t go mainstream, mainstream went grunge. And while the consequences of success were actively contributing to the demise of many of our grunge gods, the music was reaching its fans at deep emotional and psychological levels, healing and comforting millions of people. And I was just one young boy amongst the masses, captivated and forever changed.

I almost missed it. I was 10 years old in 1992 when Nirvana and Pearl Jam blew up, and was too young to go to concerts with wild mosh pits. Grunge was and is a quintessential Gen X movement, and I am the first year of millennials (to my dismay). I have always been jealous of the early fans who got to see legendary performances in small venues. But grunge transcended generations, capturing young fans like me and my friends through music videos. Videos for “Smells like Teen Spirit,” “Even Flow” and “Hunger Strike” were my gateway. And then in 1994, the video for “Black Hole Sun” was released, and its impact was profound. To my 12-year-old self, the video was scary and creepy, the music dark and melodic. But something about that song I found utterly captivating. There was a latent sadness, a melancholy, that was in some strange way comforting.

I was 14 years old in 1996 when Soundgarden released “Down on the Upside.” They released videos for “Pretty Noose,” “Burden in my Hand,” and “Blow up the Outside World.” I soaked it up, there was no such thing to me as too many viewings of those videos. But I still didn’t own a single grunge era cd. My family didn’t have much disposable income and I was always broke. It wasn’t until 1997 when I was finally able to scrounge enough money to buy the Soundgarden compilation album “A-Sides.” It was the opening of a floodgate, after which I absolutely had to own every grunge cd I could find. I bought every album from Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Alice in Chains and of course, Soundgarden.

Mainstream music media pundits were telling us grunge was dead. Kurt Cobain was dead. Layne Staley’s drug issues had torn Alice in Chains apart. Soundgarden broke up. Pearl Jam was still rocking but they had gone to unprecedented lengths to derail their own popularity to regain control over their music and find peace of mind. Mainstream music had moved on. But I was just diving deeper into grunge. I was discovering the raw energy and power of Soundgarden albums “Louder than Love,” “Ultramega OK” and “Bad Motorfinger.”

But no song spoke to me in my teenage angst like “Blow Up the Outside World.” After any day of dealing with typical teenage issues of confidence, hormones, and school social structures, it was a vital form of therapy to come home, turn the music to near deafening levels and just scream the lyrics to “Blow Up the Outside World” along with Chris Cornell. With the music so loud I could only hear Chris, it felt like I was singing it. I always experienced a profound emotional release when I screamed at the world along with Chris Cornell. No matter the trouble, I could release my frustrations through the music of Soundgarden, and that voice. Chris Cornell put voice to my frustrations and was an emotional outlet. The music was always there when I needed it. When my grandfather passed away, I sat in my car and sang along to “Fell on Black Days.” Tears streaming down my face, Chris Cornell gave voice to my sadness, and we mourned together.

I was beyond ecstatic when Soundgarden reunited and toured in 2011. They came to Vancouver in July and at long last I finally got to see them live, like I had always dreamed as a kid. It is difficult to find adequate words to properly express how incredible this concert was, to do it justice. Chris was a banshee. His voice echoed around the stadium and seemed to come from everywhere at once. On songs like “Jesus Christ Pose” and “The Day I Tried to Live,” his piercing shriek seemed to go right through me, like it was calling my soul. And then I had what I can only describe as a religious experience. The moment I had waited for half my life, “Blow Up the Outside World.” Arms outstretched, hands up, I sang along with everything I had. And I realized that everyone around me was doing the same thing. Every hand and every voice was raised. I sensed a togetherness with all these people I didn’t know, a unifying feeling that sent a shiver down my spine. It was a moment I will never forget, and I feel truly blessed to have experienced.

In the years that followed I was fortunate to see Soundgarden two more times, including at the Pemberton Music Festival in 2015, and I saw Chris Cornell solo on five occasions. I loved every song Chris ever did, from Temple of the Dog to Audioslave to all his solo albums. His ability to sit by himself on a stage with just a guitar and his iconic voice was nothing short of astonishing. I firmly believe there was no song he couldn’t sing, no genre he couldn’t perform. Soundgarden had always seemed like the genetic offspring of Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin. Though often called grunge or metal, they were really a rock and roll band, heavily influenced by classic rock yet evolved into something new. Chris Cornell was one of the last true rock legends. And he only furthered solidified this status with his breathtaking covers of classic songs, from John Lennon’s “Imagine,” to Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean,” and Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You.”

What truly connected Chris Cornell to millions of fans around the world was his authentic ability to emote. He externalized his internal struggles in song. It was deeply personal and real. You could hear it in his voice, see it on his face. And that, more than anything, was grunge. Because grunge isn’t a sound, it’s an ethos. It’s a search into the darkest depths of self, an embrace of our fears, laid bare in verse and released in song. And despite being so intensely personal, it tapped into the universal human experience. Depression, anxiety, addiction, abuse, loss. The music was there for us in our own personal struggles. The music made us feel less alone. It helped us rage, helped us mourn, helped us heal. It became a defining feature of personal identity.

And this, more than anything else, is what made the death of Chris Cornell so painfully tragic to his fans. That after all he had done for us, after all the times he had been there for us, we were not able to be there for him. In his darkest hour, we could not be there for him as he was for us. It seems so unfairly cruel.

The pain of this loss will linger. Our memories of Chris Cornell will always be bittersweet with melancholy. But the music will endure. Timeless.

We fans will remember Chris forever with two words that have become our motto, the title of an early song that best recognizes and summarizes his soulful ethos:

“Loud Love”

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Juice
1669 reads
Donate coins to cammer82.
Juice
Cancel
We lost a lot with the passing of Chris Cornell. To many, he was a mentor, a brilliant writer; an inimitable voice. Until June 30th, this challenge is for the friends and fans to write their stories, poems, tributes: anything about him. We will be putting together a book for the Cornell family, of the posts entered, as well as making copies available for purchase, donating all proceeds to suicide prevention. In partnership with Seattle Refined, the most shared post will be read on air, and posted on seattlerefined.com.
Written by cammer82 in portal Seattle Refined
GROWING UP GRUNGE: A Tribute to Chris Cornell By Cameron Gardner
I will always be amazed by the power of music. Like nothing else in this world, music is both universal and personal. Universally a quintessential defining feature of the human experience, yet created in such variety and forms as to create tastes and experiences that are intensely personal. Music can mean anything to anyone, music can make us laugh, make us cry, make us smile, make us jump, make us scream. Its power moves us emotionally and physically. Song and dance are the oldest forms of human culture, and arguably the greatest cultural achievements of our species. And thanks to our advancements in technology, music has gained immortality.

We have been fortunate enough to live through a moment in time where an expression of sound organically grew amongst a group of musicians from an underground scene that was cultivated and nurtured in its rainy city, and like a rising tide it surged into a massive wave that became a movement that shook the world and defined a generation. This sound tsunami crashed into the shore and changed the shoreline forever. Tragically in its aftermath, as the wave receded with the tide, we lost much to the dark depths from whence it came, including its most powerful voice.

We have been forever touched by this sound wave, but having lived and experienced it, we are not always able to properly recognize just how incredibly unique and rare it was and is. For the music of one city and its musicians to so effect the world as to become a central part of a generational identity, is unprecedented in history. The music transcended languages, boundaries, cultures and even the music itself. Inevitably, in our human need to label everything, we named it grunge.

The artists themselves always had a difficult time being labelled grunge. The word often became associated more with image than with sound, which never sat well with artists who were notoriously anti-image and believed in a moral obligation to preserve the purity of musical and artistic authenticity. The artists had lost control of the creature they created and it was bigger than any of them had ever dared imagine. With it came tremendous pressure. The artists were extremely uncomfortable being idolized as the voices of a generation. This humble and honest discomfort with fame only made them more endearing, more human, more authentic. Grunge never sold out. Grunge didn’t go mainstream, mainstream went grunge. And while the consequences of success were actively contributing to the demise of many of our grunge gods, the music was reaching its fans at deep emotional and psychological levels, healing and comforting millions of people. And I was just one young boy amongst the masses, captivated and forever changed.

I almost missed it. I was 10 years old in 1992 when Nirvana and Pearl Jam blew up, and was too young to go to concerts with wild mosh pits. Grunge was and is a quintessential Gen X movement, and I am the first year of millennials (to my dismay). I have always been jealous of the early fans who got to see legendary performances in small venues. But grunge transcended generations, capturing young fans like me and my friends through music videos. Videos for “Smells like Teen Spirit,” “Even Flow” and “Hunger Strike” were my gateway. And then in 1994, the video for “Black Hole Sun” was released, and its impact was profound. To my 12-year-old self, the video was scary and creepy, the music dark and melodic. But something about that song I found utterly captivating. There was a latent sadness, a melancholy, that was in some strange way comforting.

I was 14 years old in 1996 when Soundgarden released “Down on the Upside.” They released videos for “Pretty Noose,” “Burden in my Hand,” and “Blow up the Outside World.” I soaked it up, there was no such thing to me as too many viewings of those videos. But I still didn’t own a single grunge era cd. My family didn’t have much disposable income and I was always broke. It wasn’t until 1997 when I was finally able to scrounge enough money to buy the Soundgarden compilation album “A-Sides.” It was the opening of a floodgate, after which I absolutely had to own every grunge cd I could find. I bought every album from Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Alice in Chains and of course, Soundgarden.

Mainstream music media pundits were telling us grunge was dead. Kurt Cobain was dead. Layne Staley’s drug issues had torn Alice in Chains apart. Soundgarden broke up. Pearl Jam was still rocking but they had gone to unprecedented lengths to derail their own popularity to regain control over their music and find peace of mind. Mainstream music had moved on. But I was just diving deeper into grunge. I was discovering the raw energy and power of Soundgarden albums “Louder than Love,” “Ultramega OK” and “Bad Motorfinger.”

But no song spoke to me in my teenage angst like “Blow Up the Outside World.” After any day of dealing with typical teenage issues of confidence, hormones, and school social structures, it was a vital form of therapy to come home, turn the music to near deafening levels and just scream the lyrics to “Blow Up the Outside World” along with Chris Cornell. With the music so loud I could only hear Chris, it felt like I was singing it. I always experienced a profound emotional release when I screamed at the world along with Chris Cornell. No matter the trouble, I could release my frustrations through the music of Soundgarden, and that voice. Chris Cornell put voice to my frustrations and was an emotional outlet. The music was always there when I needed it. When my grandfather passed away, I sat in my car and sang along to “Fell on Black Days.” Tears streaming down my face, Chris Cornell gave voice to my sadness, and we mourned together.

I was beyond ecstatic when Soundgarden reunited and toured in 2011. They came to Vancouver in July and at long last I finally got to see them live, like I had always dreamed as a kid. It is difficult to find adequate words to properly express how incredible this concert was, to do it justice. Chris was a banshee. His voice echoed around the stadium and seemed to come from everywhere at once. On songs like “Jesus Christ Pose” and “The Day I Tried to Live,” his piercing shriek seemed to go right through me, like it was calling my soul. And then I had what I can only describe as a religious experience. The moment I had waited for half my life, “Blow Up the Outside World.” Arms outstretched, hands up, I sang along with everything I had. And I realized that everyone around me was doing the same thing. Every hand and every voice was raised. I sensed a togetherness with all these people I didn’t know, a unifying feeling that sent a shiver down my spine. It was a moment I will never forget, and I feel truly blessed to have experienced.

In the years that followed I was fortunate to see Soundgarden two more times, including at the Pemberton Music Festival in 2015, and I saw Chris Cornell solo on five occasions. I loved every song Chris ever did, from Temple of the Dog to Audioslave to all his solo albums. His ability to sit by himself on a stage with just a guitar and his iconic voice was nothing short of astonishing. I firmly believe there was no song he couldn’t sing, no genre he couldn’t perform. Soundgarden had always seemed like the genetic offspring of Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin. Though often called grunge or metal, they were really a rock and roll band, heavily influenced by classic rock yet evolved into something new. Chris Cornell was one of the last true rock legends. And he only furthered solidified this status with his breathtaking covers of classic songs, from John Lennon’s “Imagine,” to Michael Jackson’s “Billie Jean,” and Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You.”

What truly connected Chris Cornell to millions of fans around the world was his authentic ability to emote. He externalized his internal struggles in song. It was deeply personal and real. You could hear it in his voice, see it on his face. And that, more than anything, was grunge. Because grunge isn’t a sound, it’s an ethos. It’s a search into the darkest depths of self, an embrace of our fears, laid bare in verse and released in song. And despite being so intensely personal, it tapped into the universal human experience. Depression, anxiety, addiction, abuse, loss. The music was there for us in our own personal struggles. The music made us feel less alone. It helped us rage, helped us mourn, helped us heal. It became a defining feature of personal identity.

And this, more than anything else, is what made the death of Chris Cornell so painfully tragic to his fans. That after all he had done for us, after all the times he had been there for us, we were not able to be there for him. In his darkest hour, we could not be there for him as he was for us. It seems so unfairly cruel.

The pain of this loss will linger. Our memories of Chris Cornell will always be bittersweet with melancholy. But the music will endure. Timeless.

We fans will remember Chris forever with two words that have become our motto, the title of an early song that best recognizes and summarizes his soulful ethos:

“Loud Love”


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